» Posts Tagged ‘harddrives’

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Western Digital Red NASDealing with video these days usually means working with lots of data, and when you’re working with a lot, it usually means you’re backing up even more. One solution for backing up is to buy drives that already come in a RAID (like the popular G-RAID, and another is to either purchase or make your own with bare drives (and yes, before going further, RAID itself is not necessarily backup depending on how it’s configured and where the physical drives are). If you’re going to be putting together your own RAID system, click through for which drives might be a good buy. More »

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usb 3 thunderboltBoth USB 3 and Thunderbolt leave the transfer rates of yesteryear in the dust, with doubled speed in the works for USB 3.0 for a current-Thunderbolt equivalent 10Gb/s and doubled speed coming for 20Gb/s Thunderbolt rates. But in the meantime, the question stands: how does USB 3.0 compare in actual performance to Thunderbolt, and should you be in a rush to upgrade? Thanks to the guys over at Macworld, we now have some practical benchmark tests pitting the protocols against each other. Click below to see how USB 3 measured up. More »

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In 2010 I directed a 30 minute short indie film. My crew and I made use of a domain-level install of Google Docs to manage our production documents from the convenience of the cloud. It was fantastic to have everything all in one place, and we loved that it was on another login separate from our personal emails. However, there were scary hiccups, including strange non-forwarding emails, un-downloadable attachments, and login issues. As wonderful as Google is, we felt Docs left something to be desired. Considering this experience, I’m very excited to share with you another platform that offers that same closed garden approach, with added security and functionality, tailored specifically to filmmakers. It’s called Scenios, and the well-made welcome video is available after the link: More »

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Most of us who are shooting on SD cards, CF cards, or some form of solid-state memory enjoy a number of benefits that being in a digital workflow provides. Some of the biggest Pros involve sheer convenience factors like the ease of making digital copies, and the ease of storage or backup. Some of the biggest Cons, however, involve the cost of storing those large amounts of data, the logistics, and the fact that hard drive media is a bit more fragile than tape-based backup. If you’re looking for a piece of mind solution, and download speed isn’t an issue, Amazon Glacier can provide what you need for an affordable cost. Hit the jump for more details, and an incredibly intricate graphic from yours truly: More »

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Almost all new video cameras utilize some form of solid state media, like SD, CF, or SxS cards. That’s not necessarily the case with computers, however. Many of us are familiar with the clicking and whirring of traditional hard drives, but in the not-too-distant future, most of our devices will instead be using an SSD (or Solid State Drive) to store information.  The big advantage to using an SSD as your main system drive (where all of your programs and the operating system is installed), is that since there aren’t any moving parts, read times can be much faster. John Hess, over at FilmmakerIQ, recently replaced the main hard drive on his Windows machine with an SSD drive to speed up his system. Watch his process and see some benchmarks in the video below. More »

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Hard drive company G-Technology is holding their annual contest for professional and amateur filmmakers (as well as photographers and musicians): The Driven Creativity Competition USA. Filmmakers can submit in the Short Film, Animation, and GoPro Active categories and will be competing for some great prizes, including a grand prize of $5,000 towards your next creative project and an 8TB G|RAID Thunderbolt hard drive. More »

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By now many of you may be familiar with the Blackmagic Cinema Camera – it made a splash at this year’s NAB show in Las Vegas. There wasn’t a person I talked to that wasn’t excited to know more about this tiny little RAW-shooting 1080p camera. Thankfully, the camera shoots more than RAW video, as it can also shoot slightly compressed DNxHD and ProRes — but what if you do want to shoot RAW? Just like with DSLRs, most of the RAW video available in higher-end cameras is slightly compressed, as bitrates can exceed bandwidth. To keep costs down, the RAW in the BMCC is completely uncompressed RAW video, which means, you’re getting bit for bit everything that is coming out of the A/D convertor (which takes the information from the sensor and translates it into digital values). We’ve talked a bit about increased disk space requirements, but rarely about affordability. The trend for most technology is to get cheaper over the long term — but that’s not exactly happening with hard drives for a number of reasons. More »

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Ever lost important footage because your backups failed, or maybe you didn’t back up at all? Well how about losing an entire feature film and a year’s worth of work? While this isn’t a new story, as it was featured in the special features on the DVD, the tale of the failed Toy Story 2 backup is fascinating. It just proves that even when you’re spending millions of dollars, a few mistakes can be disastrous. More »