» Posts Tagged ‘hiring’

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UPDATE: the application form is now closed for this round, thanks!

We’re working hard on my feature MANCHILD and the associated short, and we’re looking for some extra hands on deck. I’d like to think this is a good opportunity; you’d be working directly with myself and other folks like Gotham Award-winning, Spirit Award-nominated producer Chip Hourihan, as well as some of the best post houses and web startups around. Read on if you’re interested in interning and you’re in New York City: More »

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UPDATE: applications are now closed. We’ll be responding this month (in January February), but give us some time to review them all. Thanks for your interest!

Want to write about something you love, and help build one of the fastest-growing filmmaking sites at the same time? We’ve got a few part-time jobs (with a lot of room to grow) available. We’re looking for General Film/Video writers, a Distribution/Marketing/Industry writer, and a Social Media/Traffic specialist. You can do any of these things from anywhere in the world. You can do them in your underwear. You don’t have to deal with the expense or hassle of commuting. You don’t have to stare at cubicle walls that are probably (and depressingly) beige. And you’ll hopefully learn a lot along the way, while building up your own abilities (as well as garnering name recognition for yourself). Read on if you’re interested! More »

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NoFilmSchool is written by filmmakers, for filmmakers, and the upside of that is we bring real-world knowledge and experience to our daily writing. The downside, as far as the “daily” part is concerned, is that we are sometimes off working on projects and unable to blog (this is where that real-world experience comes from, though). So when I go AWOL for a couple of weeks (as I just did during the Tribeca Film Festival, as one of the Tribeca grantees), that means it’s up to another writer to pick up the slack. The same goes for Joe and E.M., who also have real-world projects and responsibilities. While I want to make sure we’re always covering the news, I also want the site to start focusing more on issues of art and craft — as well as sharing short films and other content from around the web — which requires more bandwidth. With this in mind, please give a warm welcome to our new writers, Justin Minich, Christopher Moore, and MarBelle! More »

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There hasn’t been a byline on my posts here because, for the past two years, I’ve written 1,054 out of the 1,078 total posts on this site. One of my favorite comments has been “you guys are doing a great job!” because it’s actually just been one guy (except for these great guest posts). But that last post was not written by me. Until I get author names/pictures below the post titles, it might be a bit of a mystery as to who’s writing here. So I’d like to introduce you to two new NoFilmSchool writers, Joe Marine and E.M. Taboada: More »

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UPDATE: the application form is now closed. Thanks for your interest and stay tuned for future opportunities!

As a writer/director I’ve done my best to learn a bit about every aspect of filmmaking, but I want to bring on more writers — with different areas of expertise — in order to take NoFilmSchool to the next level. I believe this site can become an even more valuable resource with a proper team. So after two years of building this site myself, it’s time to expand into a site with multiple bylines. Interested in a part-time job writing about something you love? Read on. More »

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This is a guest post by Evan Luzi, a camera assistant who runs The Black and Blue.

The most amazing part of the digital cinema revolution isn’t the streamlined workflows, 5K resolutions, or the high dynamic range. It isn’t even the versatile cameras available for a couple grand. What is truly remarkable about digital cinema is its impact in the democratization of film. In theory, right now, you could take your film school money, grab a kitted out Canon 7D and go shoot a movie that visually holds up against the films playing at your local theater. The opportunity is there and while you might not need a crew for a self-made film such as a wintry montage or short landscape piece, to really dive deep into a project like a narrative feature or short film, you still need a crew. And while the technology is cheap, the people aren’t. More »