» Posts Tagged ‘hitchcock’

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North by NorthwestThink about the most iconic scenes in cinematic history. What comes to mind? The “Here’s Johnny” scene from The Shining? The “Trio” scene from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly? There are definitely too many great ones to mention, ones that probably made you want to be a filmmaker because of their masterful storytelling through the cinematography, editing, as well as the actors’ performances. Cinephilia and Beyond has shared some content that breaks down the famous “Crop Duster” scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, including an interview with Hitchcock detailing the scene, as well as a document from the film’s cinematographer that maps out all 61 camera angles. More »

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PsychoIt’s one of the most famous scenes in cinematic history. Almost everybody recognizes it, even if they’ve never seen the movie. It’s the infamous shower scene in Psycho where Marion Crane is repeatedly stabbed by a mysterious individual. With a scene as iconic as that, who would guess that the question of who directed it would ever come up? It was Alfred Hitchcock — right? Well, maybe not. Both Hitchcock and famous graphic artist and title sequence designer Saul Bass claim to have directed the 7-day shoot, but maybe we don’t need to rely on mere hearsay. Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals sheds a little more light on the situation with a side by side comparison between Bass’ storyboards and the actual footage. More »

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CriterionSince 1984, Criterion has been dedicated to collecting, restoring, and distributing some of the most important pieces of cinema ever created. If you’re a cinephile like I am, collecting these films is not only about the novelty of their stylish covers and menus, but their invaluable behind-the-scenes and educational bonus features as well. Lucky for us, Gizmodo got the opportunity to visit Criterion’s New York headquarters, where they learned what goes into a film’s restoration. Continue on to find out how Criterion goes about acquiring, digitizing, and even designing these important films. More »

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PsychoAlfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is interesting on many levels, namely its narrative structure — for anyone to kill off your star actress halfway through a film meant committing a screenwriting atrocity. Screenwriter Joseph Stefano took several risks while writing the script for Psycho, which ended up paying off big time with audiences (though critical reviews were mixed). Cinephilia and Beyond has shared a great making-of documentary about the film, in which Stefano talks about the development of the screenplay, as well as the changes he pitched that got Hitchcock’s attention. (C&B has also made the original shooting script available online for your studying pleasure.) More »

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Alfred Hitchcock RopeQuite possibly one of the first things learned about editing, whether in a class or on the job, is that “good” editing is invisible. The classical Hollywood style of editing doesn’t call attention to itself, because to do that would take the audience out of the story space and shift their focus onto the techniques used to make the film they’re watching. Of course, you could avoid all of the pitfalls of bad editing by just – not editing your footage (that’s a joke,) which is the illusion Alfred Hitchcock created in his 1948 crime thriller Rope. How did ol’ Hitch pull it off? Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals shows us how. More »

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The aspect ratio is one of the fundamentals determining your compositions. Even though we live in a time where displaying any aspect ratio is incredibly easy, films are still being shown incorrectly in many mediums in an attempt to make them fill the entire screen (even if that’s not the intention of the filmmaker). Interestingly enough, cinema history has actually been plagued by these kinds of issues related to aspect ratio. A visual essay by Criterion Collection illustrates how the intended aspect ratio of On The Waterfront is still in question to this day, and we also get a demonstration of the impressive restoration to Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much from a heavily warped and damaged print. More »

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Waters gonna rise up, wild animals gonna rerun from the grave, and screenplays gonna be online for your consideration. We have recently posted links to screenplays available to download for your consideration from Universal Pictures, Focus Features, Sony Pictures Classics and Lionsgate. Now, thanks to Fox Searchlight, we can read all of Hushpuppy’s pearls of wisdom in the screenplay for Beasts of the Southern Wild, plus download (legally) screenplays for The Sessions, Hitchcock, and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. More »