» Posts Tagged ‘inspiration’

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The Twilight ZoneBack in the day, before I was a teenager, and possessed neither status nor a pager, I stayed in every New Year’s, because New Year’s Eve is probably the least child-friendly holiday going (other than Administrative Professionals and Secretaries Day). While others froze in Times Square, I got to watch the 24-hour Twilight Zone marathon on Channel 11, aka WPIX. In retrospect, as a kid (okay, maybe a weird kid), what appealed to me most in the show was its uncanny allegories and just off-kilter aesthetic, its plots that were almost, but not quite, cheesy. More »

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Robert RodriguezWe all know Robert Rodriguez. Not only did he make his first feature for less than $8,000 and share every step of that process in his book Rebel Without A Crew, but he’s gone on to shoot countless other features and even found his own television network. For anybody wanting to make their first film, but is not sure where to start and what steps to take, a video of one of Rodriguez’s famous 10-minute film schools has been making its way around the web, and it has the answers that you’re looking for in a way that only Rodriguez can provide. So if you’ve got a few minutes, here’s Robert Rodriguez, the man himself, to tell you exactly how to make your first film. More »

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Werner HerzogThe number of reasons to not make a film are virtually infinite. You don’t have enough time, money, experience, equipment, or professional connections. If you make a film, who’s going to see it, and if no one sees it, will it even have value? I could go on, but instead, here’s a piece of encouragement from one of the most iconic filmmakers of our time, German director Werner Herzog, who back in 1979 ate his shoe as a symbol of support for fellow filmmaker and friend Errol Morris to complete his film Gates of Heaven
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Genius loserThere have never been more people who believe that they are not only talented, but destined for success, and early success, at that, to the point where they feel like an abject failure if they don’t have multiple Oscars by the age of 30. This is, of course, a load of hooey (that’s right, hooey), and the good people at Filmmaker IQ have posted an excellent two-part video essay on why failure is an integral part of success, and consequently no one (I mean no one) who does good work has an easy time of it. Click through to see just how much failure goes into overnight success, and not just in the creative field. More »

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Ira Glass Creative WorkFilmmaking as a creative pursuit can be one of the most rewarding things that a person can undertake, especially if you’re proud of the content that you create and it’s well-received by an audience. On the other hand, filmmaking is one of the most difficult creative mediums to work in, because it’s not only inherently collaborative (which can cause problems if you’re working with the wrong people), but the technicality of it can be prohibitively overwhelming. And when you have high standards, which almost all of us do, failing to live up to those standards can be entirely devastating to your creative morale. Luckily, famed radio star and producer Ira Glass has some inspiring words that will put your creative woes to rest. More »

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MysteryExec_marqueeEvery once in a while you come across a piece of advice that just kicks you right in the crotch and leaves you weak and heaving in the middle of a crowded mall or desolate highway — in a good way. This is what @MysteryExec does for filmmakers daily. If you’re an avid Twitter user, you might’ve come across this mysterious individual who dispenses sardonic wisdom 140 very honest words at a time, but recently Tribeca gave him/her the opportunity to not only expound on his/her “kick someone in the crotch” message, but also how taking the anonymity route brings back some of what he/she thinks cinema has lost. More »

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typewriterWhen I first decided that, yes, I wanted to write scripts, I asked myself, “What do I need to become a screenwriter?” Of course, the answers to that were many: read Aristotle’s Poetics, Fields, McKee, Snyder, get screenwriting software, watch movies, make connections, write. Over the years, the list has grown to include several other things — namely encouragement. In an industry such as ours, with its fierce competition and narrow path, it’s easy to become disheartened and lose confidence in your ability to achieve your goals. But over at Go Into The Story, readers took the time to write words of encouragement and give advice to first time screenwriters, which were recently compiled and put online. If you’re need a kind word, a little inspiration, or a restoration in humanity, hit the jump. More »