» Posts Tagged ‘internetmarketing’

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Simple Machine Screening in Memphis

With thousands of feature films being made each year, helping them connect to an audience has quickly become one of the biggest challenges facing the independent filmmaker today. Nandan Rao, the cinematographer behind The International Sign for Choking, Green, and the director of 2012′s The Men of Dodge City, offers his contribution to the distribution sphere in the form of Simple Machine: an online platform that connects filmmakers directly with venues to screen their films. The kicker? Anyone can list their film and anyone can be a venue. Read on to learn about how it works and why you should give it a try. More »

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Assemble Multiple Film Management

Okay, so you’ve made your film, now what? The wheels are turning in the world of independent marketing and distribution, and as filmmakers we now have a slew of options that we didn’t just a few years ago. Assemble is one of these options; an independent platform designed to empower the independent filmmaker and to be a partner through the tough marketing decisions. Assemble has been working with filmmakers and building project-specific tools since 2010, and have seen many projects go on to successful distribution paths. For anyone embarking on the daunting task of creating an online presence for your film, Assemble wants to get involved as early on in the process as possible and see you succeed. Assemble V2 recently launched along with a new admin dashboard, so whether you have a short film and you’re trying to make a feature or you’re sitting on a finished film, read on for our in-depth interview with James Franklin, founder of Assemble. [Ed. Note: nofilmschool founder Ryan Koo's site for MANCHILD is powered by Assemble.] More »

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YouTube logoIn the late 90s, it seems like everyone had a startup, but no one, especially the media giants, knew exactly how they were going to make money off this new thing called the Internet. Would there be a machine next to your computer that accepted quarters, à la those massaging beds you see in movies but have never seen in real life? Would it come from subscription fees, like the old AOL model? It turns out the answer was ads, mostly, and with its model, individual users can earn quite a bit of money with their YouTube videos. An infographic shows how at least one segment of the internet is making its scratch, moolah, bread, cab fare, etc. Click below to check out how much sweet, sweet money the top 1,000 channels are making! More »