» Posts Tagged ‘iphone’

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Ever been in a situation and needed a high quality microphone and recording, but didn’t want to carry around a few extra devices? Well RØDE has introduced the iXY Microphone, which is the first device for iOS capable of 24-bit/96k audio recordings. The new microphone has a high-quality on-board A/D converter, and attaches to the data connection port on the bottom of the iPhone or iPad. It works with RØDE’s own recording app to achieve the highest-fidelity recordings possible. Here is the video introduction from RØDE: More »

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There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »

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Vimeo has recently announced a major update to its iPhone App, adding some elegance with a new tab-based design and features like background-uploading and native Facebook/Twitter video sharing. It also retains some of the basic browsing and managing capabilities that previous generations provided. Judging by some of the feedback the Vimeo staff is publicly receiving, though, the app may have some ways to go before it’s optimally useful for busy and on-the-go users. More »

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Thoughtful, artistic lighting is necessary to set your film apart from the competition. Some great planning and pre-production on lighting design can make a $5,000 short film sell a $50,000 look. And the good news is there are many tools that can help you achieve your intended look on an indie budget, from a good book lighting setup to a bit of well-managed haze. As a new iPad owner, I recently stumbled upon Sylights, an app geared at photographers that (like many things DSLR) also has great digital filmmaking applications. Hit the jump for some screen caps and a brief rundown of this handy FREE app/website: More »

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There are many great ways to connect to other filmmakers today. We have sites like Production Hub, Mandy.com, and even Craigslist that are fantastic for crewing up and getting on crews. However, when I’m playing “closer to the chest”, I find myself sourcing locally nowadays on Facebook. I like to see who knows who of closer friends, and I prefer direct connections to general callouts. This merger of production resources and social networking is the theme behind Stage 32, a 70,000+ member network for film, television, and theatre creatives. More »

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RED’s new Meizler Module was recently introduced, and it does almost everything you think a module should be able to do. It’s wireless functionality and proxy capabilities are the main selling point, but RED is also developing their own app that allows control of a RED EPIC or SCARLET through an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. Here is another video from Sean Ruggeri at RED giving a brief overview of the Meizler Module as well as the new REDsync app: More »

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This is a guest post by Whitney Adams.

There are literally thousands of apps on the iOS and Android platforms, and plenty of them are actually useful for filmmakers. Having some of these apps is like having an entire production office or studio in your pocket. App developers have created tools for all different skill levels, so whether you are just starting your career or have been at it for a while, there is an app for you. Here are 5 that just might make your filmmaking experience more productive: More »

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Picosteady Stabilizer iPhone/DSLR/Compact Camera KickstarterWe posted a DIY stabilizer not too long ago that should actually prove to be very capable, but if building your own isn’t something you’re interested in (and you need one specifically designed for a smaller camera), some brothers from Cambridge, MA have come up with their own stabilizer that is specifically designed for that purpose. While it will work well with camera phones like the iPhone and compact cameras, it can also handle smaller mirrorless cameras and DSLRs like the Canon T2i. Check out the intro video below, but if you want a discount you’ll have to hurry ($140 vs. $180 at retail), as the Kickstarter campaign is ending at 6:53pm Eastern. More »

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Augmented Reality has been slowly making its way into our lives, mostly in the form of demo videos, games, and Google’s forthcoming Glass project. But Aurasma is a cool little app that puts the tools to create AR content into the hands of everyone, and has implications that could put an interesting twist in filmmaking for the web: More »

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You might recall that last month I wrote about The Kick –a camera mounted LED light that you can control with the iPhone– and what it’s features could mean for the future of studio lighting. The makers of The Kick have less than 48 hours to go on their Kickstarter campaign, and have shared more information about the Kick’s features and upcoming accessories: More »

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A couple of weeks ago I wrote about The Kick camera light and what it’s features could mean for the future of studio lighting, one of which was the possibility of controlling the attributes of multiple lights from a smart phone . While this is a feature that hasn’t yet come to pass for studio lights, it is starting to appear in practicals: More »

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We’ve all used shot lists on set (or most of us, anyway), and the one inevitability with all shot lists is that they’re going to change. Whether you’re way behind or way ahead, shot lists help you and the Assistant Director (if you have one) figure out where and when you’ll be shooting next. It’s usually a given that something will have to change with the shot list and it’ll be crossed out or erased and rewritten. It’s amazing that in 2012 this is still predominately how things are done for one simple reason: because it works. Well, a new iOS app called Shot Lister wants to change the way we’ve been doing things for the last 100 years of cinema, and it’s got a few tricks up its sleeve that just might convince you. More »

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At CineGear 2012, there were some interesting developments in lighting, particularly Kino Flo’s Celeb LED Panel, which allows for 5 customizable color temperature presets ranging from 2700K to 5500K. But aside from that, the features of the Celeb and the other lights shown at the expo were pretty much what one would expect from a typical studio light: a color temperature ranging somewhere between tungsten and daylight, dimmable bulbs, and either soft light panels or harder lights in the form of adjustable fresnel fixtures. But what if there was a studio light that more fully took advantage of the low heat, low power draw, and color changing abilities of LED’s? It might look something like The Kick: More »

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I’ve used (and unfortunately paid for) a couple of iPhone slates in the past. They both worked in their own ways, but they weren’t really as good as the real thing. The one positive that I’ve enjoyed from these slate apps is that they can be much easier to read, whether you’re in the dark, or your AC is getting sloppy with their handwriting. QRSlate is a whole different animal. So if you’re looking for a new slate app to go with that new iPad, this one can give you automatic metadata when you transfer your footage. It’s a pretty clever solution to help save you time and aggravation in post. More »

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Vimeo has always been a huge supporter of artists, musicians, filmmakers – anyone in the arts. They’ve fostered a community that lets artists be who they want to be, and post their work without restrictions, something that’s a bit harder to find on YouTube. Today they updated their iOS app, and like most of their website, it’s still free. The big news, however, is that it finally works natively on those millions of iPads you creatives have been carrying around. More »

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Many have lauded Avid’s latest version of Media Composer (6), and it seems Avid is not content to cede the lower-end editing market to Adobe and Apple. To that end, they have released a new iPad app, Avid Studio, which at a special introductory price of $4.99 is surely the lowest-price piece of paid Avid software. Here’s a look at the app in action (no sound, some Japanese text): More »

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Pro Audio To Go is a new $30 iPhone app designed for higher-end audio applications than you’d typically think of for the iPhone. I’ll just let the developers say it: “Pro Audio to Go turns your iPhone into a 48 kHz professional audio recorder for use on location by news reporters, journalists, documentarians, musicians, DSLR videographers, filmmakers, producers and editors. With a single tap on your phone, you can record an AIFF audio file in 48 kHz. Upload the file directly to an FTP server or email it, then download and instantly begin using it in your editing system’s Timeline. No conversion necessary!” Here’s the full feature set: More »

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If Google and Apple were politicians — and if this blog were actually a legitimate news site — I’d have to give each of them equal time. So, since I mentioned the improved video and photo capabilities of the iPhone 4S, I would be remiss if I did not also mention Google’s demonstration of Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich” last week, which, to contextualize things, will make most mobile phones higher resolution and more feature-laden for shooting video video than the first digital video camera I used a dozen years ago (which retailed for $3,500 at the time). And if you think this doesn’t relate to filmmaking at all, it turns out DP Seamus McGarvey used an iPhone to shoot parts of The Avengers — actually this has since been debunked, but the Android headline still stands: More »

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The new iPhone 4S shoots 1080/30p video. No, I’m not saying you should use it to shoot a narrative film, but in terms of ubiquity we’re going to see a lot of footage from the 4S going forward — as an indicator of this ubiquity, the iPhone 4 is the single most popular camera on flickr. Those blurry cameraphone videos used on the news for eyewitness reports are certainly going to be a lot sharper, but how does the much-hyped new lens fare against the video quality of a Canon 5D Mark II? Here’s a shootout video from Robino Films, who set both cameras up on the same tripod and rolled simultaneous video: More »

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I know the rest of the internet is already clogged with news about the new iPhone 4S — which looks the same as the previous iteration, the iPhone 4 — but there are some video-specific features worth noting. The 4S ships with an 8 megapixel backlit CMOS sensor that records 1080p video at 30 FPS. With an f/2.4 aperture and a gyro for video stabilization, those movies shot on iPhones should start looking a bit better. Per usual with Apple promo videos, the new iPhone spot is rife with “amazing,” “incredible,” and every other hyperbolic term in the dictionary, so here it is starting with the part focused on its photo/video capabilities: More »