» Posts Tagged ‘itunes’

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Veronica MarsKickstarter is slowly becoming a mainstay of independent filmmaking. Since its launch in 2009, the crowdfunding platform has generated over $1 billion in pledges, funding everything from food to gaming projects, big names in filmmaking, like Spike Lee, Kristen Bell, and Zach Braff, have brought crowdfunding into the mainstream — somewhat. Kickstarter has created their very own iTunes channel that showcases films financed using the site, giving filmmakers’ movies more access to an audience and vice versa, and hopefully giving crowdfunding more mainstream exposure. More »

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The Act of Killing Bittorent BundleJoshua Oppenheimer’s Oscar-shortlisted The Act of Killinga documentary revisiting squad leaders from the Indonesian genocides of the 60′s, was released on iTunes today. In a partnership between Drafthouse Films and BitTorrent, heaps of exclusive and free bonus content can be downloaded through their new BitTorrent Bundle. Read on to find out what’s inside the Bundle and how you can download it. More »

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Hills Green

Canadian filmmakers Ryan Glover and Krista Dzialoszynski talked to No Film School earlier this year about making their micro-budget feature film Hills Green. With the film’s release on iTunes today, I decided to bring them back to briefly talk about their festival expectations, distribution strategies and their long road to releasing on iTunes. More »

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projectorIn many ways, making your film is the easy part. There are innumerable resources out there for budding filmmakers, including websites (ahem), books, and audio commentary tracks, that will help a novice become a seasoned vet in no time (well, not no time. Probably a long time. But it’s a journey, no? Yes.) But one thing a lot of indie filmmakers are unfamiliar with, especially those just starting out, are the ins and outs of distribution. Well, have no fear. Sheri Candler and Chris Holland offer some great insight into indie film distribution. Click below to learn the answers to 3 questions every filmmaker should ask themselves as they contemplate distributing their film! More »

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vimeo-e1378182278821Vimeo has long been known for the quality of their video, and has become a haven for filmmakers who want a higher quality upload than is available from other video sites. Now they are experimenting with a new platform whereby filmmakers who debut their films at the Toronto Film Festival this week are eligible for $10,000 in funding if they distribute through Vimeo On Demand, the site’s online distribution channel launched in March earlier this year. Click below to check out this new platform and see what it could mean for indie filmmakers. More »

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In addition to the”new” iPad announced yesterday, Apple also rolled out a whole host of other updates to its “iProducts.” The Apple TV was updated to 1080p, as was iTunes, and iCloud now includes the ability to buy movies and play them from any Apple device. In addition certain apps were updated including iLife, iMovie, and Garageband, and a brand new app for iOS was introduced called iPhoto. But it’s really the new 1080p iTunes and iCloud that could do more to affect filmmakers in a specific way than the iPad. More »

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Twin filmmakers Michael and Mark Polish, whose previous credits include [easyazon-link asin="B00002SSKW"]Twin Falls, Idaho[/easyazon-link] and [easyazon-link asin="B00005JPLE"]The Astronaut Farmer[/easyazon-link], have released their latest feature through iTunes — with zero advertising. Joining the advertising budget is the production budget itself, which officially clocked in at $0 (they didn’t count food and transportation, though even if you do, we’re still talking “no budget” filmmaking). Instead, social media — chiefly Twitter and Tumblr — have led to the film generating word of mouth online, and as a result For Lovers Only (iTunes link) has already made over $200,000. Shot on a Canon 5D Mark II, here’s a clip of the black-and-white, French New Wave-inspired feature: More »

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When the iPad was first announced I wrote an article about how the device could affect filmmakers, saying, “when you’re developing a cross-platform story, what happens if you can’t define your project along clear lines? Should I say it? ‘There’s an app for that.’” Stonehenge Productions has stepped in to create these very apps, which basically package your film along with a number of extras in a manner similar to a DVD release. This allows you to sell your film in the App store — thereby circumnavigating your way onto an Apple device without having to go through the iTunes movie store. More »

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Rumors are circulating that Apple will soon release a 1080p Apple TV running iPhone OS 4 for just $99. Though Apple was long at work on this upgrade before the announcement of Google TV, the two devices are similar in that they both run on mobile operating systems (Google TV will run on Android). More important than the pricing or OS of the rumored Apple TV refresh, however, is what this could mean for Apple’s strategy of selling and distributing content. More »

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With this weekend’s release of the iPad, Apple has once again proved they know how to design an elegant product and market its simplicity as a virtue. However, there is one big knock against Apple when it comes to their software/hardware ecosystem, and that is enabling independent content creators to sell their product. It’s ironic — so many of us use Apple computers to design, edit, write, program, or otherwise bring our creations to life — but when it comes time to distribute or monetize our work, Apple generally leaves us SOL. Getting an indie movie into iTunes has been notoriously tough; I’ve kept tabs on developments at Tunecore only to have their planned video release options disappear from their site.

Thus, Distribber: recently acquired by crowdfunding site IndieGoGo, Distribber is one of the new “minimalist middlemen”1 that focuses on helping indies get their film into iTunes, Amazon VOD, and Netflix. These three stores lack an “upload” button — they all have walls around their paid content (you can get a podcast into iTunes, but only if it’s free). Distribber steps in as your “distributor” in an attempt to get your film into each store; they make no guarantees that your film will be accepted, but they refund you if your project doesn’t get in. Right now their fee is $1295, which includes a number of formatting issues and other ushering. Considering other indie distributors have charged “digitization fees” of up to $20k, Distribber’s service and price point is disruptive and very enabling for filmmakers planning on going the self-distribution route, even if it’s as Plan B.

Of course, it’d be nice if all three marketplaces would allow independent creators to sell their content without needing a middleman. But a non-exclusive, inexpensive middleman such as Distribber, like health care reform, is a BFD.

  1. Not an established term, but I’m coining it! []