» Posts Tagged ‘jeanlucgodard’

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f100pickpocketIf there is a patron saint of French cinema, surely it must be Robert Bresson, considered, after Renoir, the greatest of 20th century Gallic filmmakers. Jean-Luc Godard, no slouch himself in the French director’s department, once observed that, “Robert Bresson is French cinema, as Dostoevsky is the Russian novel and Mozart is the German music.” High praise indeed. A new video supercut from Kogonanda for the Criterion Collection focuses on the director’s inimitable use of gesture in his films. Plus, the director’s own notes on cinematography and cinema. More »

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Room 666If you could get a large group of some of cinema’s greatest directors in one room, what would you ask them? Well, director Wim Wenders got that opportunity while at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival, and subsequently made a documentary about it. 16 iconic directors, including Jean-Luc Godard, Steven Spielberg, Werner Herzog, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, were asked a series of questions about the future of the film industry, as well as the art form itself, and their answers became an incredible 44-minute video compendium of cinematic knowledge. Check it Wenders’ Room 666 after the break. More »

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FilmmakersAs filmmakers, we do quite a bit of research and study. We read a vast number of tutorials, and articles texts; we watch classic films and go to countless first showings. We do so much to fill our brains with all of the information we think will prepare us for making films and seeing our craft from a new perspective. However, sometimes all we need is a simple quote. Tumblr blog A-BitterSweet-Life (which you should religiously follow) has shared a spiffy interactive Prezi presentation that highlights some truly inspiring quotes about filmmaking and style from 12 filmmakers from all different countries and all different eras including Andrei Tarkovsky, Maya Deren, and Steven Soderbergh. More »

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Claude ChabrolEven though many great filmmakers are associated with the French New Wave, three of them stand out as the unofficial representatives of the movement: Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and Claude Chabrol. However, Chabrol rides high atop the wave crest by making, arguably, the first film of Nouvelle Vague, Le Beau SergeLike his fellow auteurs of the plastic arts, Chabrol wrote many an article on his theories of film, one of which film scholar Adrian Martin cites in an audio commentary about the filmmaker. Martin describes Chabrol’s sensibilities regarding “theme” — essentially arguing that what matters isn’t found in the script, but in the mind of the filmmaker. More »

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Godard 3D glassesAbout a month ago we shared that French filmmaker and all-around storytelling genius (obviously I’m biased) Jean-Luc Godard was dipping his toe in the 3D water, with Adieu Au Langage, a film about “a man and his wife who no longer speak the same language.” For those of you who were as astonished as I was that Godard was trying his hand at 3D filmmaking, with a camera setup he and his cinematographer built no less, here’s another thing that might be of interest to you: Adieu Au Langage isn’t even Godard’s first 3D film. Hit the jump to see trailers for the experimental 3X3D as well as his latest feature. More »

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Jean Luc Godard on set adieuLet me make this clear: Jean-Luc Godard is my favorite director of all time. There is no close second. So, the prospect of him shooting in 3D immediately altered and matured my view on 3D filmmaking, because, after all, Godard can do no wrong — even when he does. His latest film Adieu Au Langage (Farewell to Language) was shot in 3D, but perhaps not for the reasons you’d think — not because it’s attractive and popular and cool looking. For Godard, the draw came from it being new enough that it “doesn’t have any rules yet.” More »