» Posts Tagged ‘jib’

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Film Riot Camera MovementHere at No Film School, we talk a whole lot about fun new tools for creating camera movement. Whether it’s a slider, the latest variation on the gyroscopic gimbal, crazy jibs, or even the 100 foot technocrane, chances are that we’ve talked about it at some point. However, one thing that isn’t talked about nearly enough are the reasons and motivations behind adding camera movement to your films. But worry not, NFS brethren, because Ryan Connolly of Film Riot has a fantastic video just for people looking to move their cameras. Check it out. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Can Huge Camera Cranes Be Affordable & Functional? Luke Neumann Says Yes - No Film SchoolGetting a large crane shot can be nearly impossible on a budget. Very often crane operators are not cheap, and the equipment is also expensive to rent. But what options do lower-budget folks have? Turns out there is some cheaper gear out there that should perform admirably and give you big-budget results. Luke Neumann of Neumann Films reviews one such piece of gear below, the Came-TV 33 ft. crane: More »

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Gemini JibSomething as simple as moving your camera will add not only the kinetic energy you may need to keep your work from being boring, but the sophistication you may desire for your professional career as well. The tools we use to do this are often big, heavy, and only serve one purpose, but Digital Juice has announced their light and versatile Gemini Dual-Action Jib, the industry’s “first transformable jib”. Not only can you utilize the Gemini from the back for a number of different crane shots, but you can also move to the front and operate it like a handheld stabilizer. More »

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DIY JibAs no-budget/independent filmmakers, achieving the look of high production value and not spending a ton of money are always at the forefront of our mind, and finding the optimal point at which those two things meet is our main concern. Often, that means a DIY solution. Chung Dha shares with us his process of constructing an inexpensive DIY jib with a remote tilt, which will give you more versatility and control over your film’s aesthetics, while not causing you to break the bank while doing it. Continue on for his tutorial. More »

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HipJibFor the past few years, Kickstarter has been rife with all sorts of campaigns for gadgets and gizmos aimed at budget filmmakers. Oftentimes, these new inventions are just slightly modified versions of classic designs offered at a cheaper price. Other times, these crowdfunding products are unlike anything else out there, like the SnapFocus. And then there are times when a product comes along that is so simply brilliant that it makes you wonder why you hadn’t thought of it first. The hipjib, a small device that turns any basic tripod into a versatile camera movement system, falls into the latter category. Check out the campaign video for the hipjib below: More »

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We’ve talked about travel sliders here at nofilmschool a couple of times before. However, even the smallest of sliders can be a hassle to get into your backpack, and most of them aren’t particularly useful if you want to slide any more than two or three feet (which, let’s face it, we all do). Enter Nice Industries, creator of the wildly popular Aviator Travel Jib, with a brand new product, the Red Rocket Travel Slider. This is no ordinary slider, however, as the components to get it all set up can be fit in a case the size of a shoe box. But that’s not all, with a track length of anywhere up to ten feet (yeah, you heard that correctly), the Red Rocket might just be one of the most versatile travel sliders ever. Check out the Kickstarter launch video below: More »

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A few months ago, Kessler teased what they were calling the Pocket Jib Traveler. While we only got a few details, a few things were clear: it was going to be small, and it was going to be light. Now, we’ve got the full description and details on the jib as it nears release, including an introduction video that gives a rundown of the features as well as complete assembly information. Check out the video below. More »

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There’s a variety of rigs out there for pretty much all your mounting needs — Cinevate and of course Kessler are go-to solutions for jibs running the gamut from heavy-duty to collapsible, respectively. The same goes for shoulder rigs, with options ranging from professional solutions to lightweight prefabs all the way down to homebrew kits. Of course, something that can pull double duty as a portable jib and custom shoulder rig — which you can put together yourself for $50, to boot — may be the best of, like, three worlds. Read on to check out some details — plus info on how to build your own 360 degree panoramic head mount, plus some hardcore DIY stabilizers — all geared toward the low-to-no budget but crafty shooter. More »

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Back at NAB 2012, I stopped by the Cinevate booth to check out some of their newest products, and one that many around the booth seemed most excited about was the Axis Jib. The heavy-duty jib, which has gone through a number of iterations to satisfy the needs of shooters, has finally been released by Cinevate. Many people might be familiar with newer and lighter jibs that have been designed smaller and more compact for DSLRs, but this is a real, professional jib for heavy cameras. Check out the introduction video: More »

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One of the biggest problems with jibs is that they can be cumbersome to carry with you and pack away. We’ve seen different solutions for this problem, one recent product that dealt with this was the Aviator Travel Jib (which was actually a successful Kickstarter project). Now Kessler, who is best known for their slider products — but has been producing some other interesting gear in the last few years — is teasing a brand new jib that should be great for transporting while still giving you fantastic moving shots. Click through to check out the teaser video for the new Kessler Pocket Jib Traveler. More »

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The Aviator Travel Jib is one of the lighter jibs in existence, and if you haven’t checked it out, we’ve already talked about their successful Kickstarter campaign. Zeke Kamm, the inventor of the Travel Jib, is running a contest right until July 9th where he will be giving away an Aviator Travel Jib Mag Alloy Kit, 3 Legged Thing tripod, and a thinkTank Airport Commuter camera backpack. Below are the details. More »

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Camera movement can not only make your shots more interesting, they can help move the story forward in a way that static shots cannot. Most of my experience with jibs has been with the rather large and bulky Miller jibs that are made for extremely heavy cameras. In these days of small cameras and DSLRs, a heavy duty miller jib is overkill for a DSLR that weighs only a few pounds. That’s where the Aviator Travel Jib comes in, and even though the Kickstarter project has successfully raised funding, there’s still a chance to get one at a greatly reduced price: More »

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This is the very last video I did at NAB just before the show closed, and Dennis Wood of Cinevate showed off all of their exciting products, including a complete cine kit for the FS100 that bolts to the camera in a similar way as the Zacuto FS100 rig. He also gave a walk-through of their Axis jib, which is designed to be mobile and simple to assemble. If timelapse is your thing, and you’ve already got a Cinevate slider, they are partnering with DitoGear to add timelapse functionality. More »

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Have you been jonesing for arcing vertical and horizontal camera moves?  Perhaps you simply want an easy way to elevate your camera without having to climb a fence or set your tripod ontop of a chair.  Well, you’re in luck.  Here are two DIY jib projects that will let you do those things for less than $30 and a bit of your time.  The first is a small jib arm courtesy of Olivia Tech, the second is a slightly larger jib project from The Frugal Filmmaker, check out these videos to see them in action: More »