» Posts Tagged ‘lomography’

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Lomography is both an analog-based film movement as well as a manufacturer of specialty products conducive to such an activity — these include the LomoKino 35mm stills-to-motion camera and the (successfully) Kickstarted Smartphone Film Scanner app/device. Lomography’s goods aren’t for everybody, or every project — but the company has some exciting news for the analog enthusiast in all of us, especially while production of 35mm film seems to be slowing down. Lomography will be releasing a new ISO 400 35mm color negative stock called LomoChrome Purple, inspired by the surreal quality of Kodak’s discontinued Aerochrome infrared stock — read on to check out the details. More »

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Though I understand where these things come from, calling something like Lomography “the analog Instagram” is like calling Kodak’s new Super 8 stock “the chemical MiniDV,” or even better, “the new digital from back before digital” — for the sake of modern analog (dear lord I just said that) we’re getting our chicken-and-egg orders mixed up. That said, we’ve seen some pretty interesting blends of the old and the new… and then back to the old again. There was The Impossible Project’s Impossible Instant Lab, which made Polaroids of cell phone stills — which we also called “the Real Instagram,” though again, I understand why. Thanks to (both a hobby and) a company called Lomography, the opposite chicken-egg process is possible — with some help, your smartphone is now also a digital scanner of film negatives. Read: Instant scanning, insta… sharing. More »

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As if low-cost furniture and a TV set weren’t enough, it looks like IKEA has created their own still camera. Probably the greenest still camera ever made, it was handed out at a design expo in Milan. Supposedly this will end up being sold in stores (whether that includes U.S. stores or not isn’t clear), but the fact that they’ve simplified and reduced the cost of something as complicated and expensive as a digital camera shows just how far we’ve come, as it’s no thicker than a folded piece of cardboard. More »