» Posts Tagged ‘mac’

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Lightworks For MacFor the past few years, we’ve been patiently awaiting the long-rumored arrival of the Mac version of the legendary NLE Lightworks. A functioning version of the Mac software was shown as far back as NAB 2013, and at that time, many of us started to get excited. Nearly a year later, EditShare, the company which now owns Lightworks, announced that the public beta of the Mac version would become available in the middle of June. Well folks, the day has finally come where Mac users can head on over to the Lightworks website and download the software for themselves. Rejoice! More »

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No Film School interviews Tim Haskell from Limelite at NAB 2014There’s a lot of LED lighting companies out there, but we haven’t come across any doing quite what Limelite are doing here: putting high output, high CRI leds inside of a form factor that everybody is used to in fluorescent tube fixtures. Ryan Koo spoke with Tim Haskell from Limelite on the NAB floor to get the scoop, click through to watch the interview: More »

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LightworksIt has been almost a year to the day when Editshare shared that their award-winner NLE Lightworks was going through alpha/beta testing for Mac OS X, and since then the question on the minds of its supporters has been, “When will the public beta of the mac version be available?” Well, it looks like they’re much closer to completing the platform trifecta (Windows, Linux, and Mac), because Editshare has announced that they indeed have a date nailed down, as well as a few other pertinent pieces of information about Lightworks that you might want to know. More »

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macpro-2013-open-100058793-largeIn the past few weeks, we’ve covered the release and the early reports of the performance of the new Mac Pro extensively. From what we’ve seen to this point, it doesn’t seem like a stretch of the imagination to say that these machines will become fairly ubiquitous in the filmmaking world over the next year or two. However, there’s one aspect to this story that we haven’t yet covered, and that’s the economic debate of performance vs. price, especially in regards to people who use these machines as the foundation of their creative businesses. Our friend Chris Potter over at Screenlight (a video-sharing software for video pros) has written up a fantastic post about how to make the best economic decisions for your creative business as you look to purchase new hardware. More »

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Mac ProWe already know that the brand new Mac Pros are impressive machines, both in terms of raw specs and design. However, until this point it’s been unclear just how fast these new computers are in comparison to older versions of the Mac Pro, as well as in comparison to some spec’d-out iMacs and MacBook Pros. We here at No Film School have taken the time to pull together the first round of speed tests and benchmark tests from a few tech sources around the interwebs, and not surprisingly, the new Mac Pro is an absurdly fast computer. Stick with us to see just how fast. More »

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Screen Shot 2013-05-29 at 2.08.18 PMWhen it comes to screenwriting software, there’s Final Draft – and then there’s everything else. Or, at least, this was the situation for years. I can remember being a teenager (many years ago), getting a copy of Final Draft for Christmas, and being really excited that I wouldn’t have to hand-set all the margins and pagination in Word anymore, which everyone knows is excruciatingly annoying. These days, there are plenty of new options, including Fade In, an application that gives Final Draft a run for its money (literally). Click below to check out a review and get a breakdown of the features! More »

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We’ve seen a few apps capable of controlling different programs on your computer with an iPad. A recent app that caught our eye, ProCutX, is capable of controlling Final Cut Pro X with your iPad, and replacing many of the functions normally done with a keyboard. For a limited time (possible only a few more hours), the full app, which is normally around $25, is now free on iTunes. Click through for a video walk-through of ProCutX. More »

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If you’ve been waiting on a Retina Macbook Pro, now might be a better time than ever to take the plunge. Apple recently cut prices on their 13″ Retina Macbook Pro, and also updated its capabilities at the same time. They’ve also brought some spec upgrades to the 15″ Retina Macbook Pro for the same base price, and the Macbook Air saw a price slash of its own. Check out all of the new deals below. More »

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The keyboard can certainly be a powerful and efficient control surface for non-linear editing, especially with the mastery of hot-keys and short-cuts. Despite this, some editors desire a more visually intuitive way of interfacing with their NLE. There are those that prefer specialized color-coded editing keyboards or keyboard covers, while others swear by their tactile controllers. Those can go for around $80, but what about using an infinitely configurable iPad to take the place of one of these consoles? We’ve already seen one iOS app capable of controlling a wide range of video software, but with a new iPad app called ProCutX, Apple editors have yet another way to turn their tablet into a Final Cut Pro X console. Check out some images and details below. More »

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It’s no secret that the ‘new’ Mac Pro isn’t here yet, but if it’s not coming anytime soon, you’re going to be Mac Pro-less in Europe for the foreseeable future. That’s because the Mac Pro does not comply with a new European regulation set to go into effect March 1st. No one really knows what’s coming in the next version, though we had a terrific guest post talking a bit about what the new Mac Pro could be like. But what if Apple went even more radical (but still functional) with their new design? Peter Zigich, a designer, has taken a stab at what he thinks would be a perfect replacement to the current model: a modular Mac Pro that isn’t one-size-fits-all, but accommodates a wide range of professional and consumer applications. More »

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Apple is steadily abandoning its own FireWire standard, continuously simplifying the ports on its machines, and pushing for the growing acceptance of FireWire’s successor — the Thunderbolt protocol. Given all this, Mac users find themselves in a bizarre transitional phase. It may be frustrating, because while Apple surges forward, peripherals’ acceptance of Thunderbolt has been lackluster at best. Much to the relief of perennial Mac users finding themselves unable to blend their legacy gear with, say, their fresh iMac or MacBook Pro, Matrox has finally released it’s DS1 Thunderbolt docking station — the first solution of its kind — which looks to seamlessly marry almost everything you could want between the old and the new. More »

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In what will surely be welcome news for those who routinely use Photoshop and Premiere, Adobe is planning to natively support the higher resolution display of the new Macbook Pro (as well as any other HiDPI displays in the future). While there are certain creative applications that immediately supported the Retina resolution with software updates (namely Apple’s Final Cut Pro X and Motion), Adobe was not able to offer this support right away. For those who are loving the extra screen resolution, it’s disappointing to then have to open Adobe products only to see them not share the same crispness as the native apps. Not all Creative Cloud applications will receive support (at least at this time), but you can read the full list of programs that will get software updates below. More »

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Last we heard, Apple CEO Tim Cook wrote an e-mail shortly after the WWDC stating that Apple is “planning a new Mac Pro for later next year.” Now, it looks like there is some additional evidence to support this assertion in Mountain Lion’s configuration files, and it also points to a significant potential hardware change in the Mac Pro update: More »

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This is a guest post by Tristan Kneschke.

With the release of Apple Color several years ago, the once-niche field of high-end color grading trickled down to the average user. When Blackmagic released DaVinci Resolve on Mac it became more obvious that color grading was the next big wave. Having already been grading professionally with Color shortly after it was released, I quickly decided to invest in a traveling DaVinci Resolve Mac Pro tower. The client demand for color grading in particular, and a traveling station specifically, has grown my business at a rate I never thought possible. Now, with Resolve 9 nearing its official, non-beta release, Blackmagic has separated itself even more from Apple’s killed product. More »

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Today Apple released the update to OS X Lion — this time called OS X Mountain Lion (version 10.8). As with any new Apple operating system release, there is always excitement mixed with some eventual dread. New OS versions tend to break (or at least make unstable) some large and complicated programs we use every day that haven’t had the chance to update — like Premiere Pro or Avid (I would hope that Final Cut X wouldn’t have any issues since it’s an Apple product). Many don’t have any problems, but often the kinks are worked out by manufacturers in a short amount of time. I haven’t yet installed the update, but if you’re wondering what’s new in this version, here is a great 5 minute video that will show most of the major updates: More »

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Today Apple refreshed their current line of MacBooks across the board, and also showed off a brand-new MacBook Pro, which quadruples the resolution of their previous laptop to 2880×1800. Among other things, this allows editors to set their viewing window to a full 1080p — while maintaining a full editing interface around it. Furthermore, one of the biggest arguments against 4K cameras is the lack of high-resolution displays in the home. If no one can see higher resolution imagery because we don’t have capable displays, then what’s the point (whether our eyeballs can see the difference is another argument entirely)? The redesigned 0.71-inch thin, 4.46lb laptop sports a next-gen featureset: USB3, Thunderbolt, nVidia Kepler graphics card, up to 768GB of SSD storage, quad-core processors, a 7-hour battery, and a new lower-glare display. It starts shipping today, starting at $2199. More »

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First there were rumors of its demise, then there was a plea from users for information, and now according to 9to5 Mac, reliable sources say that Apple will be unveiling a new Mac Pro at the World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC). More »

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For screenwriting, I’ve been a long-time Final Draft user, but I’ve never been a huge fan. It’s like the Microsoft Word of screenwriting software — ubiquitous and adequate, but not something you’re particularly excited about. I’ve been using it since Version 4, and it has definitely improved since then, but for a $250 program I’ve never felt that it has evolved as much as I’d like. What am I looking for? More structuring and outlining tools. This is where Movie Draft comes in. Note that it’s Mac only available for Mac, Windows, and Linux, it’s rated nearly 5 stars in the Mac App Store, and it only costs $30. More »

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Video takes up a lot of hard drive space. HD video more so than SD, 4K more than HD… and since the flooding in Thailand, hard drive prices have spiked precipitously. So there’s always room in an editor’s toolkit for an app to analyze drive space and zero in on the largest directories to delete or move. Similar to my approach to tracking time, freeing up space is all about focusing on what’s important: in this case, the largest files. DaisyDisk is a paid Mac app that I find myself using frequently; here’s a review from NextUpMac (and a free alternative). More »

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One of the reasons I haven’t updated my How to Build a Hackintosh guide (which, I should note, is even more popular now than the DSLR Cinematography Guide — probably because most people have the PDF of the Guide and don’t need to visit the latter as often) is that my machine has been working perfectly and so I haven’t feel the need to constantly search for new components. However, I recently upgraded my machine to OS X Lion (it’s working great), and so I also updated the guide to reflect an easy way to do it, courtesy Unibeast from Tonymac: More »