» Posts Tagged ‘makeup’

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ScannersScanners, David Cronenberg’s 1981 film that defies explanation (you really have to see it, as any synopsis will sound kind of ridiculous; I’ll give a really half-baked one shortly, though) is justly famous for not only its mind-bending narrative, but its torrent of effects, including one scene where, well, a guy’s head explodes. Check out this video and see how they did it! More »

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Rick Baker alien 2Oscar-winning special effects makeup artist Rick Baker, who, by the way, shares tons of top notch tutorials on his YouTube channel that you should check out immediately, recently tweeted several images of his alien designs for Steven Spielberg’s unrealized sequel to Close Encounters of the Third Kind, entitled Night Skies. The models, all 11 of them, were created by Baker at the direction of Spielberg, who was looking for aliens with distinctive personalities based on a script written by John Sayles (one of which looks just like E.T.). The sequel project might’ve been scrapped, but the models, or photos of them at least, were not. Check them out after the break. More »

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Taxi DriverStudying films, whether they’re poorly or masterfully made, is one of the greatest ways you can educate yourself about how (not) to make a film. Martin Scorsese’s masterfully made Taxi Driver has been studied time and time again by experts, students, and enthusiasts, but in this 1999 documentary about the making of the film, we get to hear from the filmmakers themselves, including Scorsese, screenwriter Paul Schrader, DP Michael Chapman, editor Tom Rolf, the cast, and even legendary makeup artist Dick Smith, who explain in great detail how Taxi Driver came to be. Continue on for a few key takeaways from the doc. More »

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Miss ShockMaking films often rides on being well-connected — knowing someone somewhere who can perform a service that your film needs. Most of the time, finding financial backers, a DP, sound/lighting techs, actors, and editors is fairly easy regardless of who you know or where you live. However, finding a good FX artist is a little bit more tricky (In 6 years, I’ve only met 2 in my hometown), and if you’re unable to find one, you might have to do the next best thing — learn how to do it yourself. And who better to teach you some excellent techniques than Oscar-winning special effects makeup artist Rick Baker. More »

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Digital ZombiesIf you’re making a zombie flick, but you don’t have a talented makeup artist, but you do have a talented digital effects artist who can composite the bloody, rotten, festering features of the undead, then maybe it’d be a good idea to go digital with your characters’ zombification. A recent tutorial by Ryan Connolly of Film Riot shows us how to use a handful of digital tools, such as After Effects, Mocha, and MonsterFX Undead, to create a believable, decaying, and altogether disgusting zombie for your film. More »

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Makeup EffectsWhen making a scary movie, the horror you want your audience to feel should come from the terrifying monsters and well-timed surprises — not bad makeup. One of the more challenging aspects of making horror films, or any movie that calls for extensive bloody makeup, is making wounds look real. Adam Savage’s (MythbustersYouTube channel, Tested, visits effects artist Frank Ippolito, a contestant on Sy Fy’s special effects make-up competition series, Face Off, at his shop in LA to find out what tools and techniques he uses to make realistic wounds inexpensively. Continue on to watch the video: More »

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How to make a moldMy first legitimate short film was a 50s era monster flick with all the conventions a terribly good B-movie, including a lurching, unrealistic monster (ours was a nuclear Burmese python/Kodiak bear hybrid) — if only we had the time, money, and know-how to craft a proper mold for a fuzzy serpentine mask. Luckily, SFX gurus, cast members on Sy-Fy’s Heroes of Cosplay, and hosts of Try This At Home, Holly Conrad and Jessica Merizan of Crabcat Industries give us a couple of handy tutorials on how to create molds from sculptures, which will (hopefully) later become monster movie works of art. Check out the tutorials after the jump: More »

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SFX_handYou know — there’s more than one way to skin a guy’s arm. The London-based filmmakers of the short film He Took His Skin Off For Me have come up with a unique and intriguing premise for a film: a “story of a man who takes his skin off for his girlfriend, and why it probably wasn’t the best idea.” If that’s blowing your mind right now, just take a gander at their tutorial that shows you how they created the “skinless” SFX. If you have $250 and a team of dedicated and talented artists and filmmakers, you could be well on your way to making excuses to make a film about people with no skin. Check out the tutorial, videos, photos, and a few words from director Ben Aston after the jump. More »