» Posts Tagged ‘martinscorsese’

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Raging BullThe visual components of a movie are obviously integral to filmmaking; the images that are the hallmark of our medium allow us to see the narrative unfold. However, cinema is also a medium of sound, and how we use the audible elements can drastically change how our audiences respond to our stories. In this eye-opening video essay from Tony Zhou, the concept of using silence is investigated in-depth, primarily through Martin Scorsese’s use of it in his films, like Raging Bull, to demonstrate how silence can actually speak louder to your viewers than a cacophony of sound effects, dialog, and music ever could. More »

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Roger EbertRoger Ebert, am I right? I am. Best guy. All day. Besides his heroic struggle with and total refusal to capitulate to cancer, the man was a working film critic for over forty years, and while, yes, that might sound like a dream job, it also means seeing every drecky rom-com that comes out each Friday and writing up 500 to 1000 vaguely thoughtful words about it. And his words were never vaguely thoughtful. They were always incisive, smart, and usually spot-on. Now there’s a new documentary about the man himself, directed by Hoop Dreams‘ Steve James along with Martin Scorsese as Executive Producer. Click through to watch the trailer and learn more! More »

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Thelma SchoonmakerLegendary editor Thelma Schoonmaker has collaborated with Martin Scorsese for essentially the entire length of both of their careers, starting with Scorsese’s feature Who’s That Knocking at My Door?. Needless to say, this 3-time Oscar winner, with nearly a half a century of filmmaking experience, has insight into the craft that you’d be hard-pressed to find elsewhere, and fortunately for us, Schoonmaker has shared 8 Golden Rules of filmmaking with MovieMaker Magazine, and we’ve selected a few to share with you. More »

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ScorseseWe all have filmmakers that we admire — ones that exemplify the artistry of the craft and speak to us on a deep, personal level. Well, Martin Scorsese took some time to discuss the directors whose careers he admires, namely for their boldness in taking risks narratively and cinematically. Billy Wilder, John Cassavetes, and Orson Welles, just to name a few, receive the Scorsese treatment in their own (very) short video analysis. Continue on to check them all out! More »

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Tribeca Talks Industry Master Class:The Cutting Room: An Insight to the Edit Suite - 2014 Tribeca Film FestivalOn Friday, as part of the Tribeca Film Festival, Martin Scorsese’s longtime editor, Thelma Schoonmaker, sat down to discuss what was advertised as a look at her career. What we in the audience got was a granular breakdown of the editing and film techniques, as well as other production information, about the painstaking work that went into making Raging Bull,  consistently voted one of the Best Films of the 1980s. Click through for a breakdown as well as some other inside tips from the artist who helped bring this masterful vision to the big screen. More »

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Criterion CollectionThe Criterion Collection offers a lot more than access to some of the best and most historically significant films from around the world (and great supplemental features, too). The site also provides studious cinephiles with its own extras, like engaging articles about these classics and their world-class filmmakers, as well as their Top 10 lists, which share the favorite Criterion films of some of the biggest creatives, who explain why they’re important to them personally and professionally. Continue on to see which classics filmmakers like Jane Campion, Christopher Nolan, Martin Scorsese, and Roger Corman put in their top 10. More »

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Taxi DriverStudying films, whether they’re poorly or masterfully made, is one of the greatest ways you can educate yourself about how (not) to make a film. Martin Scorsese’s masterfully made Taxi Driver has been studied time and time again by experts, students, and enthusiasts, but in this 1999 documentary about the making of the film, we get to hear from the filmmakers themselves, including Scorsese, screenwriter Paul Schrader, DP Michael Chapman, editor Tom Rolf, the cast, and even legendary makeup artist Dick Smith, who explain in great detail how Taxi Driver came to be. Continue on for a few key takeaways from the doc. More »

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Martin Scorsese Film SchoolAlmost a year ago, we shared a list of 85 films that Martin Scorsese marked as essential to learn everything you need to know about cinema. Seeing as Scorsese is not only one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, but a walking encyclopedia of cinematic knowledge, it would be more than fair to say that the list, as well as the director’s insight into each film constitutes some of the best and most inexpensive film education available. Inspired by the list, Flavorwire compiled audio clips of Scorsese referencing said films and put together an almost 30-minute crash course on film. More »

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CasinoWhen a director as capable as Martin Scorsese makes a film, every one of its dimensions offers so much in terms of education. The editing, cinematography, use of sex and violence, and storytelling in his films have been studied before on NFS, but if you’re looking to add a new dimension to your Scorsese expertise, take a second to check out two separate video essays that explore the director’s representations of women by cutting together scenes from each of his films. More »

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The 2014 Academy Awards are now exactly two weeks away, which means advertisements, TV spots, interviews, and talk show appearances featuring nominated films and their actors are reaching their seasonal apices. But over at Keyframe, they’ve put together a video that pits each Best Director nominee against each other in a fight to see which one is most deserving of the Oscar. Continue on to take a closer look at the directorial styles, performances, and artistic approaches of some of the most talented directors working today. More »

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ScorseseCountless filmmakers set their stories and tripods down in New York to make their movies, but when I think about the filmmakers whose work encapsulates the unique heart and spirit of the city, two come immediately to mind: Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese. The object of Robert Kolodny’s affection, and the one for which he honors in a beautiful video tribute, is Queens-native Scorsese, whose entire career could be seen as a love relationship with the city played out on celluloid. In his three-minute video, Kolodny whisks us through New York, letting us peer through the eyes of the great director through his most celebrated work. More »

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Martin ScorseseAny time Martin Scorsese talks about his approach to making movies, filmmakers would be wise to listen — especially when he’s being interviewed by fellow amazing director Paul Thomas Anderson. At a recent awards season screening for Wolf of Wall Street at the ICM Theater in Century City, Scorsese and his AD, Adam Somner, sit down with Anderson to talk about their approach to photographing the film, the controversies, and Awards Daily’s Sasha Stone was there to record the whole thing. Take a look after the jump. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.21.44 PMThe dolly zoom, also referred to as the Vertigo effect or a Zolly shot, is a technique wherein the camera is dollied either forward or backward while the zoom on the lens is pulled in the opposite direction. When timed correctly, the effect of this technique is one in which the characters in the frame remain the same size while the foreground and background become compressed or de-compressed, depending on which direction the camera is traveling. It’s a technique that has been part of the cinematic language for almost 60 years, and as such, it has evolved over time. Our friend Vashi Nedomansky over at Vashi Visuals has put together a comprehensive look at the evolution of the dolly zoom, and it’s a fantastic watch, to say the least. More »

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TheMaster_PaulThomasAndersonP.T. Anderson is a director who has worked within the Hollywood system for almost his whole career and yet managed to maintain an independent spirit exemplary of the sort of personal work typified by the best of indie cinema. He is also a director whose style has undergone a dramatic evolution since the relatively recent start of his career. We investigate some of the homages Anderson has paid to some of the greatest directors in cinematic history, like Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and Mikhail Kalatozov, as well as his ever-evolving, maturing style. More »

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Martin ScorseseIt has been over six months since Steven Spielberg and George Lucas talked about the impending doom of the current studio system. Now, another Hollywood heavyweight, director Martin Scorsese offers his opinion on cinema’s current and future state in an open letter to his daughter, originally published in the Italian magazine l’Espresso. Scorsese’s take on the future of filmmaking is that, yes, it’s surely changing, but it’s still bright and promising thanks to something that has become more the rule than the exception: low-budget filmmaking. More »

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notjustyoumurrayI just wrote about the early documentaries of Stanley Kubrick, and now, in an embarrassment of riches, we have three early student films by Martin Scorsese to look at. Unlike Kubrick, whose first efforts were commercial news reels and industrials, Martin Scorsese was a member of the so-called “film school generation,” attending NYU in the 60s. Filmmaker IQ has posted three of Scorsese’s early student films, and they are instructive viewing for any fan of Scorsese, or student of cinema. Click below to check out these three early works from a master!
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Thelma Schoonmaker/Scorsese1990 was a very good year for Martin Scorsese. After making a diverse group of films in the 80s, he reunited with Robert DeNiro for Goodfellas and later that year shot a segment for New York Storiesan anthology film of three shorts by Scorsese, Woody Allen, and Francis Ford Coppola. During the editing, the French documentary series Cinéma, de notre temps (or, The Films of Our Time) filmed a 45-minute documentary on the director, and it’s a fascinating glimpse into his life, personality, and working habits as he edits his short with long-time collaborator Thelma Schoonmaker. Click below to hang out with one of cinema’s best, and most personable directors. More »

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Movie Title Saul BassTitle sequences are usually the first things we see when we watch a movie, setting the tone for what’s to come. I’m a huge sucker for a good title sequence — Lars von Trier’s films have some awesomely weird ones. But, I’ve always been drawn to those from the 50s and 60s for their playful, jazzy, minimalist aesthetic — come to find out that many of those title sequences were made by “movie title master” Saul Bass, who frequently worked with filmmaking legends, like Hitchcock and Scorsese. Check out this 55-minute documentary entitled Title Champ, which explores the art, the filmmakers, and the world inside a world that Bass came to know so well. More »

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Martin Scorsese, Los Angeles, 1986I think the thing that made the greatest impact on me when I was in college was this strange concept, one I’d never heard of before — the concept of visual literacy. Understanding the historical, technical, and cultural significance of the film language is incredibly important, and in an essay by Martin Scorsese, he writes at length about how understanding it is not only imperative to create better films, but also for experiencing the intricate design of a cinematic story, and fully appreciating the auteurs who have managed to become masters of a widely foreign, albeit universal tongue. More »

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Alisa LepselterWoody Allen’s films are known for many things, but editing isn’t necessarily one of them. Which isn’t to say that the cutting in a Woody Allen film isn’t excellent, it’s just not something that calls attention to itself, except for rare occasions like the beautiful black and white shots that open Manhattan. And it’s his unobtrusive cutting style that has helped subtly define his films, with simple switches from a single to an over the shoulder changing the emotional tone of a dialogue scene without the audience even noticing. Invisible editing is everywhere, of course, but Woody’s working methods are famously unique, and now Alisa Lepster, his editor for 15 years, talks about the process of this legendary writer/director and how to cut a Woody Allen movie. More »