» Posts Tagged ‘mashups’

Description image

Light BulbHow many times have you come across an article with a title like “50 Million Ways to Get Rid of Writer’s Block” and “Unlikely Foods that Will Jumpstart Your Writing”. Being a writer myself, I enjoy the plethora of creativity advice, tips, and tricks, but I’m often at a loss as an editor. The repetition of commercial jobs or the tediousness of a project you’ve worked on for months can turn your once purified spring of creativity into a sludge-filled stagnant pond. Well, Vashi Nedomansky of VashiVisuals has got you covered. Check out this editor’s approach to dealing with creative stagnation after the jump. More »

Description image

We are reaching the end of 2012, and it’s been another interesting year of movies. There are still quite a few I haven’t seen myself that I would like to before the year is over, but if you’ve been wondering what you might have missed so far this year, there is a terrific mashup that has been making the rounds that takes clips from the trailers of films from 2012 edited together in a way that actually provides some extended meaning. Check out the video below: More »

Description image

The focus here on NFS may mostly be on the creation of original pieces of work, but that doesn’t mean that we hold the art of the remixer or mash up artist in any lesser regard; it clearly takes skill to be able strip an existing piece of work down to its component parts and reassemble it as something brand new. One of the leading practitioners in this space is Australian electronic music artist Nick Bertke, better known as Pogo. Individually, and previously as a member of creative agency Reverse Enginears, Pogo has reworked films such as Alice in Wonderland, Mary Poppins, Terminator 2 and The Lord of the Rings, but personally I’d point to Lead Breakfast a Pulp Fiction remix as one of his best (unless you’re wearing headphones, I’d save this till you’re out of the office): More »

Description image

In a genre that’s since come to be dominated by the often crass commercialism of, say, Dreamworks Animation, the originator of the 3D animated feature — Pixar — remains a cut above the rest. Watching this compendium of their 15-year history, it strikes me that these movies feel like real events, with real people, begetting real memories — but amazingly, they’re just 1s and 0s. And despite the billions of dollars made and every manner of commercialism pursued, Pixar films still feel driven by imagination, not merchandising. Here’s a look back, expertly edited by Leandro Copperfield: More »