» Posts Tagged ‘mft’

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Metabones_spnfg-bmpcc-bm1_03sThis year a company called Metabones released the Speed Booster, an adapter which makes lenses faster, wider, and sharper as long as they were designed for a larger format than the format you’re currently working with. They already introduced adapters for Micro 4/3 cameras like the GH3, but now they’ve created new Nikon mount Speed Boosters designed specifically for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera that make lenses on those bodies even faster and wider, and give the Super 16mm Pocket essentially a Super 35mm sensor. More »

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Nikon Metabones Speed BoosterIf you’ve been living under a rock for the past few months, you may not have heard all the buzz about this amazing adapter called the Speed Booster that can actually make lenses faster, sharper, and wider. How does it does this exactly? Focal reducers, as they are called, have been around forever, but as long as you’ve got a big enough piece of glass, it basically works like moving a projector closer to a screen. Things get smaller, but they also get sharper. The Canon Speed Booster for NEX has been available for some time, but if you are more comfortable with a native mount attaching to your NEX E-Mount, or you’d like a Micro 4/3 mount version, and you needed to be able to control Nikon G series lenses (the ones without a manual aperture ring), Metabones now has a solution for you with the new Nikon Speed Booster. More »

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Blackmagic Cinema Camera with Micro 4-3 Mount - AngleIf you are in the US, and you’ve had a pre-order for the EF-mount version of the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, they are currently in stock at places like B&H. While there aren’t infinite quantities, if you’ve been looking to buy, you can get one right now at a number of different retailers. If you switched your pre-order to the Micro 4/3 version, there might be some light at the end of the tunnel for shipping on that model, especially as it has been some time since the Beta testers got a hold of that model. We’ve also got more footage shot with the Pocket Cinema Camera from John Brawley (which shares the same sensor technology as the original BMCC). This time he takes the camera into some serious low-light situations and puts the camera through its paces. More »

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The Micro 4/3 mount Blackmagic Cinema Camera was announced back in September 2012, and just recently we saw that beta cameras were starting to ship to people around the world. Many have asked which camera they should be ordering (since they both sell for $3K and you can switch your pre-order to EF), and while we’ve done our best to answer that question (and more), it’s always good to hear the perspective of someone who has used both models. Philip Bloom reviewed the camera back in September, but he finally got an MFT camera to try out, and he’s posted his review online. Check it out below. More »

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The Blackmagic Cinema Camera is still steadily shipping out, but so far they’ve only been sending out the EF mount cameras. The issue of infinity focus with those cameras was confirmed to not be affecting the shipping speed, so there is hope we have seen the last of the delays and shortages. If, however, you’re one of those who switched your order to the Micro 4/3 BMCC (or ordered separately), it looks like shipment could be just around the corner. More »

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It may be a few months away from getting into the hands of us regular folks, but the Micro 4/3 mount version of the Blackmagic Cinema Camera has gotten plenty of work in a number of real-world situations thanks to John Brawley. While he’s been testing plenty of PL mount lenses on the camera (we’ve got some brand new footage below), he’s also been trying out of all of the manual MFT lenses that are currently out there, including those from Voightlander, and a brand new lens from SLR Magic, the new T/0.95 lens, which just may be a perfect go-to option for the MFT BMCC. More »

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In the whirlwind of hyperactive change that is Moore’s Law, branding can be a prime anchor point. Brand identity fights the tendency toward ‘the new’ with powerful invocations of the past: nostalgia, reliability, simplicity, and the association of that brand name with the creation of very dear memories. Granted, nostalgia alone can’t save anyone from bankruptcy — but it’s a start. Polaroid, Technicolor, and Kodak are prime examples of this interplay, and each is adapting in its own ways — though there’s some overlap. Not one, but two of these traditionally film-based companies are even releasing digital cameras. In whatever the way, each of the three is working toward the preservation of its own historic brand name — which do you think will pull through? More »

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Just a few short months ago, it was announced that the Blackmagic Cinema Camera would be receiving a Micro 4/3 lens mount option alternative to its original Canon EF mount. Granted, for those of us still waiting on the BMCC to ship, a few short months is no stretch of time to merely shrug off — particularly when the mount announced was to be a “passive” or “dumb” one, meaning electronic control would not be supported for smart MFT lenses. There’s been speculation that this would change — and given Blackmagic’s recent addition to the consortium of companies aligned with the official Micro 4/3 standard, this speculation seems less outlandish than ever. More »