» Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

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indieflix indiegogo campaign indie independent cinema film filmmaking revenue profit movies viewing streaming web video content monetize seld direct distribution festival service logoIn our direct distribution roundup, we went over IndieFlix as basically the ‘indie version of Netflix.’ Subscribers pay $5 per month or $50 per year to stream an ever-expanding library of films. This may sound familiar, but unlike everybody’s favorite binge-watching enabler, IndieFlix makes earning money for independent filmmakers central to its mission. You can stream on any device with an internet connection, but IndieFlix is still missing a proper mobile app – and that’s where you come in. Though an app is already in the works, IndieFlix has embarked on an Indiegogo campaign to help it reach or surpass its development goals even sooner. More »

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Vimeo EchoVideo technology is at an explosive crossroads as the mobile experience perpetuates our media landscape. With apps like Instagram and Vine, creators are constantly redefining how images are experienced. With the acquisition of Echograph, Vimeo changed the iOS app from its $2.99 market price to a free app, suggesting that they are most interested in exploring what draws people to a mobile experience. Hit the jump for more info and a juicy interview with Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor: More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video 'Video on Instagram' - nofilmschoolThis doesn’t have to be confusing, so let’s briefly recap: various apps and services have quested to achieve the status of being the ‘Instagram of Video.’ Instagram, of course, is known for essentially being the ‘Twitter of Photography.’ Twitter itself has stepped up as a favored contender in this quest with its 6-second-maximum micro-video service Vine. Now, Instagram itself is offering ‘Video on Instagram,’ which allows up to 15 seconds maximum micro-videos. All of which is — well, good — and hopefully fun, but how viable are these apps for the creation of artistic content? More »

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Ryan Gosling Wont Eat His CerealVine, the Twitter-owned iOS app that lets you take, upload, and now embed 6 seconds of video, has been making the rounds since it was released back in January of this year. Tribeca held a contest for filmmakers to make movies with Vine, but similar to Twitter itself when it began, we haven’t quite figured out its true purpose. That is, until now. Ryan McHenry, who directed a BAFTA-winning short film called Zombie Musical, has created something of true genius with the app. Behold, Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat Cereal, the very reason Vine, and possibly the internet, was created: More »

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Vimeo’s latest advancements come in the form of an optimization of what already exists: their mobile website and On Demand platforms. Boasting that over 1/3 of their monthly traffic can be accredited to their mobile site, the new redesign aims to make it easier for users to find and view content, as well as connect with the community. By the same token, they have also updated the interface for the Vimeo On Demand homepage, making it look and feel a little bit more like platforms we’re used to. Click through to see the new improvements. More »

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We’ve seen a few apps capable of controlling different programs on your computer with an iPad. A recent app that caught our eye, ProCutX, is capable of controlling Final Cut Pro X with your iPad, and replacing many of the functions normally done with a keyboard. For a limited time (possible only a few more hours), the full app, which is normally around $25, is now free on iTunes. Click through for a video walk-through of ProCutX. More »

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The keyboard can certainly be a powerful and efficient control surface for non-linear editing, especially with the mastery of hot-keys and short-cuts. Despite this, some editors desire a more visually intuitive way of interfacing with their NLE. There are those that prefer specialized color-coded editing keyboards or keyboard covers, while others swear by their tactile controllers. Those can go for around $80, but what about using an infinitely configurable iPad to take the place of one of these consoles? We’ve already seen one iOS app capable of controlling a wide range of video software, but with a new iPad app called ProCutX, Apple editors have yet another way to turn their tablet into a Final Cut Pro X console. Check out some images and details below. More »

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Twitter is “the internet’s SMS.” Instagram is the Twitter of pictures. Some app somewhere is prophesied to be “the Instagram of Video.” I’ve used epic words for social media’s ‘cinemaminigram’ before, because it’s apparently that big of a deal — or it may just be YouTube. Then again, if Instagram is Twitter for photos, but Facebook nabbed Instagram — all while ‘Instagram for Video’ is still out there — what’s a Twitter to do? The next best thing, or better: Twitter has just dropped Vine for iOS. It’s a lot like Instagram, but for 6 second looping videos. Given that Twitter already is, well, the Instagram of words, this app could be the ‘IoV.’ Is this saga at the beginning of its end? More »

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The iLeatherman* for filmmakers is very real. Case in point: let’s say you can’t afford the $400 GoPro HERO3 (or justify the purchase for whatever reason), but you still need a tiny HD rig that laughs in the face of danger, damage, and almost certain death — and you do own a smartphone. Meet G-Form’s waterproof/impact-resistant technology — your freefalling iPhone will survive a 100,000+ foot drop from space with it. The thing about that of course is, that same smartphone also has an HD video-capable camera built into it… you can see where this is going. Say ‘hello’ to G-Form’s G90 ‘Action Sports Camera’ cellphone cases — including variants for Android models. More »

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Talk about your digital leatherman: The number of ridiculously handy — and practical, and portable, all in one — apps for filmmaking on mobile devices is probably one of the greatest tech-vantages we’ve got going for us these days second to low-cost high-res acquisition. Uses range from lighting plot diagramming and shooting scheduling all the way to Canon DSLR control via Android and RED control via iOS — there’s an app for all that, and more. Now, thanks to Adam Wilt of Pro Video Coalition (and a lot of other great stuff), your iPhone is now more of an asset on set than ever before — and that’s because his new $5 app Cine Meter turns your iOS device into a light meter, waveform monitor and false-color display. More »

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Is it possible we’re losing something through the non-destructive way in which we decide the final look of our shots? The answer, quaintly enough, is absolutely yes — but what, exactly? Simplicity. True finesse in color timing is something Dale Grahn (Saving Private Ryan, Gladiator, Munich, Apocalypse Now: Redux) knows a lot about, and in a true chemical timing sense — which says a lot about the power of bold and minimal control over imagery. Lucky for any of us looking to learn from the experience, Mr. Grahn is asking you to match his own color grades by way of a new iPad app — and in the process interact with the very essentials of color grading. More »

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More than anything, users appreciate the undeniable consistency (and therefore, customer confidence) that comes with any Apple machine or app. This applies to both consumers and professionals, though some of the latter may hesitate in days to come. Of course, achieving this consistency can be a double-edged sword — the very measures that guarantee the quality you’ve come to know and respect of Apple computing are the same tendencies that see them labeled as “notoriously controlling.” This too goes for the staunchly unwavering prices of Apple products across the marketplace — that double-edged sword extends all the way out to how such pricing is so firmly set. And, in terms of sword metaphors, this is more often the kind that cuts a hole in your pocket than the kind that “slashes prices.” More »

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Though I understand where these things come from, calling something like Lomography “the analog Instagram” is like calling Kodak’s new Super 8 stock “the chemical MiniDV,” or even better, “the new digital from back before digital” — for the sake of modern analog (dear lord I just said that) we’re getting our chicken-and-egg orders mixed up. That said, we’ve seen some pretty interesting blends of the old and the new… and then back to the old again. There was The Impossible Project’s Impossible Instant Lab, which made Polaroids of cell phone stills — which we also called “the Real Instagram,” though again, I understand why. Thanks to (both a hobby and) a company called Lomography, the opposite chicken-egg process is possible — with some help, your smartphone is now also a digital scanner of film negatives. Read: Instant scanning, insta… sharing. More »

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Yesterday, Google announced that YouTube was coming to your real tube in a big new way, by way of your Android device and WiFi. Today, RCA has reported something similar, but the opposite — sort of — perhaps looking to get in on today’s lucrative tablet market. Interestingly, in this case, the company has announced an Android tablet that will be capable of wirelessly receiving television channels, for free — but not via WiFi internet access. The device will tap the airwaves in much the same way the ‘bunny ears’ of your parents’ old cable-less TV set did back in the ’50s, but allow you to do so while traveling, up to 100 miles per hour. More »

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YouTube is doing a lot to make itself a media service platform that rivals the traditional television you’re used to. Original channels are getting a major push, creators are being given some big perks as incentive, and shooting/uploading elegance now trumps native video-sharing options on rival mobile devices. There’s still plenty of things that need to be ironed out before all of us may seriously consider YouTube as a hub for our own content — but Google is still looking toward the future and forging ahead. The ability to watch YouTube on your home TV set is already proliferating, but now, Google has announced an app update that allows you to control browsing and viewing directly with your Android phone or tablet. More »

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Lytro is a company implementing a novel and fascinating idea — obvious enough for anyone to appreciate it’s wow-factor, but original enough that visual creatives can be impressed with its technology — you can set your focal distance after taking your shots. Now, you can also even shift your perspective a bit, another near-magical innovation for digital photography. That said, right now Lytro cameras have several major limitations: they are stand-alone cameras, which may be inconvenient for shooters used to novelty photography on a tiny multi-use device — plus, there isn’t great direct mobile integration with social media. Interestingly, Toshiba has just announced that it’s developing its own lightfield-type sensor, specifically for tablet and smartphone applications — and, it’s expected to allow focus shift for your mobile video as well. More »

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I wasn’t really expecting to have to refer to the theoretical ‘Instagram of Video’ for another while — major choices for mobile users are already in place and ‘in the running’ for such a title, and it could be a while before everyone in the discussion unanimously declares one app the victor (if ever). The Verge (seemingly in a nod to comments) acknowledged YouTube as the elephant in the room for these apps, because even on iOS where the YouTube app is read-only (well, watch-only — no uploads), the service is the megalith for easily-socialized video. A complete YouTube experience is already native on Android (again, YouTube is Google is Android), perhaps to the chagrin of recent Android-joiner Viddy. A new development may totally shift the dynamics of this interplay, however: Google just yesterday released YouTube Capture for iOS. More »

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Where is the supposed ‘Instagram of Video?’ Is it even possible for a motion-based media/social service to be as lightweight, sharable, and just plain easy as Instagram makes stills? The jury is still out, the verdict on which of the contenders will stick — if any at all — is still to be determined. We covered a bit on some of the startups stepping into the ring already, and since then, some other relevant material has surfaced. In one corner, heavyweight Viddy (one of the favorite bets) has just released an Android version of its service for many smartphones, while in the other, small independent startup Lumify wants to make “filmmaking for everyone” and attempts to answer “Why our mobile videos suck.” More »

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Pro Audio To Go is a new $30 iPhone app designed for higher-end audio applications than you’d typically think of for the iPhone. I’ll just let the developers say it: “Pro Audio to Go turns your iPhone into a 48 kHz professional audio recorder for use on location by news reporters, journalists, documentarians, musicians, DSLR videographers, filmmakers, producers and editors. With a single tap on your phone, you can record an AIFF audio file in 48 kHz. Upload the file directly to an FTP server or email it, then download and instantly begin using it in your editing system’s Timeline. No conversion necessary!” Here’s the full feature set: More »

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If Google and Apple were politicians — and if this blog were actually a legitimate news site — I’d have to give each of them equal time. So, since I mentioned the improved video and photo capabilities of the iPhone 4S, I would be remiss if I did not also mention Google’s demonstration of Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich” last week, which, to contextualize things, will make most mobile phones higher resolution and more feature-laden for shooting video video than the first digital video camera I used a dozen years ago (which retailed for $3,500 at the time). And if you think this doesn’t relate to filmmaking at all, it turns out DP Seamus McGarvey used an iPhone to shoot parts of The Avengers — actually this has since been debunked, but the Android headline still stands: More »