» Posts Tagged ‘moire’

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Issues with Moire on the Blackmagic Cinema Camera? Mosaic Engineering Has a Solution - nofilmschoolThe Blackmagic Cinema Camera is even more of a bargain now that BM has reduced the price by $1,000. 10-bit ProRes/DNxHD and RAW recording for just $2K is quite a deal all things considered, but there is still the nagging issue of occasional moire since the BMCC lacks an Optical Low Pass Filter/Anti-Aliasing Filter, or OLPF/AA filter. A company well-known for producing those exact filters for Canon DSLRs, Mosaic Engineering, is making progress on a special OLPF filter designed specifically for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera. More »

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Many were hopeful that Canon was going to rid all of their DSLRs of moire and aliasing, but they’ve saved those improvements to all but their most expensive cameras. The full-frame Canon 6D, which was announced back in September, is about a $1,000 cheaper than the Mark III, but unfortunately suffers from aliasing and moire (something that is absent from the Mark III’s image). Mosaic Engineering has been developing anti-aliasing filters for Canon and Nikon DSLRs, and they’ve finally come out with one for the Canon 6D, the VAF-6D. Could the new filter make it the perfect full-frame camera in terms of price/performance in Canon’s lineup? Check out the first sample video below. More »

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Back in May it was announced that the Canon 7D anti-aliasing/moire filter from Mosaic Engineering was being released, and there were plans to make one for the other cameras as well. We already know how well the filter works for the Canon 5D, but it was anyone’s guess if they had fixed any of the issues with the original filter. Sebastian over at cinema5D takes a look at the filter and compares an unfiltered 7D in the video embedded below: More »

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Not too long ago a company called Mosaic Engineering surprised the DSLR world and came out with a filter that greatly reduced the aliasing and moire patterns on the Canon 5D Mark II. Installation was relatively straightforward, and the only major drawback was that super-wide lenses could appear very soft, especially in the corners. Now they’ve released a similar filter for the Canon 7D, and as you can see from the video embedded below, it will work in much the same way. They are also developing a filter for the Nikon D800, which has similar moire problems as the 5D Mark II, even though I haven’t really noticed it too much in my testing. More »

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That’s not quite how I’ve been spending my time with the 5D Mark III, but thankfully James Miller was brave enough to try to get the most out of his camera by tearing it apart. We know that the Nikon did not completely remove the low-pass filter on the D800E, because it still requires the IR filter – but the Mark III seems to have two strong optical low-pass filters in front of the sensor. James explains exactly what he did below, and it is definitely giving his 5D Mark III a lot more detail than before – and he’s got some video to prove it. More »

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I love the smell of fresh aliasing in the morning! Video/DSLR maven (and Man-child backer!) Philip Bloom first broke the news of the VAF-5D2 optical anti-aliasing filter for the Canon 5D Mark II, a $375 filter that promises to fix pesky moire issues on the venerable Canon DSLR. Now he’s got a full review of the filter (I have one on order, as I think it could extend the life of my 5D), which causes a negligible 1/8 stop of light loss: More »

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Yesterday Philip Bloom dropped a bombshell on the HDSLR world, announcing that he’d found a filter that claims to fix most aliasing problems on his 5d Mark II — and that actually works. Earlier solutions have caused a loss of sharpness or didn’t work at all, whereas this $385 optical filter seems to genuinely eliminate moire on most lenses. Check it out: More »

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Aliasing and Moiré. The bane of many HDSLR shooters’ existence. Many have tried and failed to defeat the jaggies and discoloration that reveal the ugly, line-skipping truth about our DSLRs. But now Jorgen Escher has released a Final Cut Pro plugin that can defeat some of these problems. While you shouldn’t expect Jorgen’s plugin to cure the most serious of aliasing issues, he’s come up with a post-production method that works by defining the problem areas and applying chroma blur. Here’s the before/after video: More »

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I have tried Cavision, Lee, and Tiffen soft filters in an attempt to eliminate aliasing and moire but have yet to find a solution. Now Philip Bloom is reporting (from a user’s comments) that Zeiss Softar filters offer a potential remedy for these problems. I’m skeptical, given I’ve tried a number of similar filters (and the Softars claim to “retain sharpness,” which would mean… retaining aliasing), but here’s the word from Zeiss: More »