» Posts Tagged ‘money’

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Finding money is often one of the toughest tasks many independent film producers face, as well as one of the most critical. You need money to make movies, and you need to make movies to build a successful career. Building relationships with investors is one big, important step you can take to help find money on an ongoing basis for your projects and further your cause.

This is a guest post by Fred Siegel, CPA. More »

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If you’re involved in the film or TV industry in any way, there’s a good chance you or someone you know has benefitted from Section 181 of the U.S. IRS Tax Code since it was established in 2004. Basically, it gives any investor the ability to deduct 100% of the money they invest in that same year for production costs up to $15 million dollars — and possibly as much as $20 million dollars. The good news is that as part of the last minute “Fiscal Cliff” deal, Section 181 has been renewed for 2013, which means that investors have a federal incentive to put money into a project, in addition to the various state tax incentives. More »

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This year’s Vimeo Festival + Awards screened a bevy of award-winning awesome videos (many of which we featured here on NFS), and also featured a number of workshops, panels, and the like. I showed up on one panel as a sort-of surprise guest, joining Brian Newman (who recently guest-posted here) to talk about “the art of getting paid.” Whether it’s an art or not, in the independent film world getting paid at all can sometimes feel like a triumph, and so we talk about many different approaches, including web series, merchandising, Kickstarter, this web site, and more. The full panel is below. More »

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Hollywood’s accounting practices are so infamously convoluted that you could write a book on them. Two, in fact: author Edward Jay Epstein has written two books on the topic, The Big Picture: Money and Power in Hollywood and The Hollywood Economist: The Hidden Financial Reality Behind the Movies. I read his first book, but by this point my memory’s a bit hazy, so listening to the latest episode of the Script Notes podcast by screenwriters John August and Craig Mazin was a great refresher on the topic of where the money goes in Hollywood. More »

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Did you know that for the last seven years, film investors could tax-deduct the entirety of their film investment (up to $20 million), in the same year they made the investment, regardless of whether the film made a profit or loss? This has been possible thanks to IRS Code Section 181, which, according to indieWIRE, is the only federal tax credit available for independent film investors. Section 181 is set to expire at the end of 2011, however, and is not likely to be renewed. So if you’re looking for investment in a film project of yours, and you want to entice investors with this significant deduction, you’ve got a little over two months to get started — and by “get started,” I mean getting your paperwork in order and filming at least one day (thus the reason for the asterisk). More »

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Can a blog like NoFilmSchool be self-sustaining? As a blogger you can make money by being a contributor to a huge tech or political blog, wherein you’re one of many staff writers churning out content every day — which I’ve done — but can you turn a profit by writing about what’s important to you, on your own site, in your own way? In my recent manifesto I talked about blog revenue being one (small) slice of the self-sustaining pie, and on this site’s about page I wrote, “a big part of figuring out how to be independently creative — and by this I mean, being able to work on your own creations, for yourself, without having a day job — is figuring out how to derive value from the content you create.” Here, then, are the traffic and revenue stats from NoFilmSchool for the just-concluded month of April: More »

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I’m a few days late on this, but as someone who’s been trying to get a low-budget NYC production off the ground for the past six months, this is not a pleasant specter to stare in the face: More »