» Posts Tagged ‘monitor’

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FV SpectraHD 4 1280-720 EVFF&V has been steadily cranking out quality lighting products, and at NAB 2014 they introduced their first EVF. Containing features that you’ll find in higher-end EVFs/monitors, the new 4.3″ SpectraHD 4 is going to come in at a bit lower price than some other options. They’ve also got a larger 7″ monitor with slightly less resolution, which should work well as an inexpensive additional monitor on the camera. Finally, they are introducing new lights with far higher CRI ratings — which means better color reproduction. Check out the interview below: More »

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Atomos talks to No Film School at NAB 2014Hot on the heels of the February announcement of the award-winning Ninja Blade, Atomos have announced two new products that cover the budgetary gamut of external recording needs. Click through to watch Joe Marine’s interview with Atomos Business Development Manager Will Thompson at NAB to discuss functionality, pricing and availability: More »

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No Film School with Teradek at NAB 2014, Showing off the Serv and TeraView AppTeradek is already well known for their wireless streaming devices and yet they seem to be able to offer something new each year. This NAB they show off the Serv and a free iOS and Android application called TeraView for monitoring up to 4 signals on a single device. Hit the jump to get on the ground floor with Ryan Koo and Teradek’s Michael Gailing: More »

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No Film School with Mitch Gross and Convergent Design at NAB 2014It’s not uncommon for today’s tools to be equipped to handle multiple applications, and the Odyssey 7Q certainly exemplifies this. Ryan Koo caught up with Mitch Gross at the Convergent Design booth at NAB 2014 to get in depth with the 7Q and get a sneak peak at the upcoming Athena. Hit the jump to check it out: More »

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LG 4k monitor4K computer monitors aren’t new. In fact, several models are currently available right now from makers such as Asus, Sharp, and Dell. However, LG recently announced their first 4K monitor, which seems to be targeted at filmmakers. How? Well, typically 4K monitors offer a 16:9 aspect ratio, but this 31″ monitor, called 31MU95, not only offers 4K resolution, but also a 19:10 IPS panel (a DCI compliant 1.9 aspect ratio), which LG has dubbed “Real 4K.” Continue on for more. More »

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HDMIPi PrototypesThere aren’t many inexpensive monitors out there, and when you do find them, they are often pretty low-res, usually below HD. That’s no good if you’re trying to use them to pull focus or double-check a take and see if it was in focus. But what if you could get a 9″ 1280 x 800 monitor for under $150? Alex Eames from RasPi.TV and Dave Mellor from Cyntech want to make it happen. The company is working on a monitor for the Raspberry Pi computer, but with the generic HDMI input, it can be used with virtually any HDMI device, including cameras. Here’s their pitch video: More »

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tvlogic lcd monitor viewfinderThe world of external shooting monitors is more diverse than ever. SmallHD’s products alone comprise quite a range of options, sizes, and affordability. The trend seems set to continue, because TVLogic’s new field LCD boasts one thing few others can — true 1080 HD resolution. Announced just recently at IBC, the 5.5″ monitor is set to accept all manner of SDI up to 3G and traditional HDMI, plus many of the display options shooters want and need. Read on for more details from TVLogic. More »

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waveform monitor histogram after effects adobeDepending on the acquisition system, waveform monitors and vectorscopes can guide quality control of your imagery from shooting all the way down the pipeline to grading, mastering, and compression for delivery. Scopes can seem a little intimidating and esoteric to the new user, but getting the basics down can really help in owning your image. Recently, Alexis Van Hurkman over at ProVideo Coalition has answered some key questions about scopes: find out which ones he considers the most indispensable below, plus when it may be a good idea to trust your own pair of eyes in making adjustments — even when your scopes are reading ‘A-Okay.’ More »

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We’ve had a few posts revolving around open source 3D modeling & animation suite Blender recently, including some info on using it to model color space in three dimensions. Now, as a bit of a ‘BTW, FYI’ to a more recent post concerning the free release of all 4k F65 footage acquired for Blender’s CGI/live-action Tears of Steel, we have some info that may actually help you visualize that or any other 4k footage in full-res — without an actual 4k monitor. It isn’t perfect — it’s a bit rough and ready, and may require Linux, but we thought our readers should know that it’s possible, especially since very few of us have access to 4k viewing, be it through projection or UHD TV sets. Read on for some details on how the Project Mango team devised its ‘DIY 4k’ monitoring solution. More »

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On-board monitors might not be among the sexiest pieces of gear on set, but they are definitely among the most useful. Whether they’re used as a reference for a camera assistant or a dolly grip, the camera operator isn’t able to use the eyepiece, or you’ve got a director who likes to hover behind the camera, on-board monitors have become essential to the filmmaking process in the digital age. But with so many different monitoring technologies, and with just as many options for these monitors in the marketplace, deciding which on-board monitor is right for your next production can be a downright daunting task. Luckily for us, AbelCine has our back. More »

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Talk about your digital leatherman: The number of ridiculously handy — and practical, and portable, all in one — apps for filmmaking on mobile devices is probably one of the greatest tech-vantages we’ve got going for us these days second to low-cost high-res acquisition. Uses range from lighting plot diagramming and shooting scheduling all the way to Canon DSLR control via Android and RED control via iOS — there’s an app for all that, and more. Now, thanks to Adam Wilt of Pro Video Coalition (and a lot of other great stuff), your iPhone is now more of an asset on set than ever before — and that’s because his new $5 app Cine Meter turns your iOS device into a light meter, waveform monitor and false-color display. More »

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There is a good chance the computer or mobile device screen you’re looking at right now was not actually manufactured by the same company who made the device. This is normally the way Apple and most other computer companies make their products, buying screens from third parties rather than making their own. While Apple normally has first dibs on most of these screens, at a certain point they are also sold to anyone and everyone, and that’s exactly where you, the consumer, can benefit from lower prices while still getting high quality. Click through to find out how you can get a monitor with the same exact LG panel that Apple uses in their 27″ displays for only $390. More »

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There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »

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The differences between competing pieces of technology often become very, well, technical in explanation — but most of the time, we don’t get to use the term ‘organic’ as a qualifier. This happens to be true in the case of SmallHD’s new OLED HDMI and SDI monitors — and Organic Light Emitting Diodes are actually news to me in general. What’s even more exciting is that SmallHD is looking to provide very high-quality monitoring solutions for prices previously unheard-of. Read on for a more comprehensive specs readout and a bit on what makes OLEDs different from traditional LCD systems. More »

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The external monitor market has exploded in the last few years, and companies like SmallHD and TVLogic have a ton of new competition. As filmmakers we now have plenty of exciting options like ikan’s 5.6″ D5 monitor, which features HD-SDI and HDMI pass-through and a 1280 x 800 IPS panel. Rick Macomber of DSLR News Shooter takes a look at ikan’s new monitor in the video review below. More »

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Re-purposing something is always fun, especially when it can be used to help out filmmakers. This is one of the more interesting DIY monitors I’ve seen, and it’s got one of the largest screens I’ve ever seen for a device like this. Basically, the Motorola ATRIX 4G Laptop Dock for the ATRIX 4G phone can be used as an external monitor. The Micro HDMI port on the device senses any incoming HDMI signal and then outputs it on the screen. Check out the video below of the device in action with a Canon 60D: More »

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If you want a monitor that you can actually afford, look no further than some of the products from ikan. They’ve got some of the cheapest monitors in existence, and they are also unveiling a new flagship IPS display that will be competitive with similar IPS displays from SmallHD. Today we’ve got a video with Ryan Aivalis, who is a jack-of-all-trades at ikan, from drafting to blog writing. Ryan participated in the Blogger’s Breakfast discussion at NAB (which also featured yours truly), and in the video embedded below he introduces some of the exciting things that ikan is working on. More »

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SmallHD is one of the younger display companies at NAB, but that doesn’t mean their products are low-quality. They are introducing a beautiful 1280 x 800 7″ screen that takes advantage of OLED technology to produce the richest colors you’ve ever seen on a monitor. They’ve got two versions that cost exactly the same, $2,700, but the other monitor uses a super-bright LCD to make viewing in daytime much simpler. I had a talk with Dale Backus from SmallHD, and he introduced both monitors and the Port Protector in the video below. More »

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I’ve been doing a number of interviews and filming self-shot videos as part of my attempt to make my first feature film. I’ve used a number of external monitors with my 5D Mark II in the past but I don’t actually own one myself, so I haven’t been able to see the rear LCD while I’m standing in front of the camera. But as I was shooting an interview with NextWaveDV’s Tony Reale today, he mentioned that I could use the free bundled EOS Utility software to monitor the camera’s output over USB with my laptop. As the author of The DSLR Cinematography Guide, it seems stupid that I didn’t know this, but I’d either forgotten (very possible, as my brain is quite frazzled these days running the campaign) or I’d never tried it in the first place. It’s the cheapest way to get an external monitor (since it costs nothing): More »

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SmallHD has announced a new 4.3″ DP4 monitor for $549 (or $749 with their new viewfinder attachment). SmallHD doesn’t have a booth at NAB proper, instead throwing a party nearby; here’s FreshDV with their great annual NAB coverage of the monitor’s launch: More »