» Posts Tagged ‘noisereduction’

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Izotope RX3A few weeks ago, we shared a post about using Adobe Audition’s built-in noise reduction tools to rescue bad production audio. While I personally have been satisfied by the results that I get from the suite of tools in Audition, many of the comments on our Facebook post and the article itself mentioned a popular noise-reduction plugin called Izotope RX3. After some cursory research, I’m now convinced that RX3 is the most magical thing that I have ever laid eyes upon. So with that in mind, here’s a quick overview of the Izotope RX3 as well as a few tutorials on how to incorporate the plugin into your audio post-production workflow. More »

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Lights Film School SoundUnderstanding the limits of what you can do when recording sound will help inform your decisions from the very beginning — making your job easier and your work better in the end. Lights Online Film School is currently open for enrollment in their online film courses, and they’ve shared some material to give filmmakers a taste of what the coursework looks like in the form of several sound tutorials. Check them out after the jump. More »

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darkenergylogoblogthmCinnafilm’s Dark Energy plugin for After Effects is arguably one of the best noise reduction and grain emulation tools on the market today. Most notably, Shane Hurlbut turned to Dark Energy in order to make the Canon 5D Mark II shine for Act of Valor, and high-end production companies around the world rely on Dark Energy for everything from noise reduction for green screen keying to film grain emulation. However, at this point in time, Dark Energy is only available as an AE plugin (and only on the PC). The folks over at Cinnafilm have just started a Kickstarter campaign to port Dark Energy over to the OFX platform so that it can be used in programs like DaVinci Resolve, Nuke, and Avid. Check out their campaign video below: More »

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Hollywood films often use tools that regular users can’t easily afford. A good example of that is with a movie that Shane Hurlbut shot, Act of Valor, filmed on the Canon 5D Mark II. The post-production of that film involved a software suite called Dark Energy that is often used with restoring film prints, but in this case they used it to clean up DSLR footage and get rid of compression artifacts and noise, as well as add realistic grain. Well not too long ago, Cinnafilm, the company behind Dark Energy, introduced a Windows plugin for Adobe After Effects. Until Friday, March 15th, the plugin, which is normally $400, is down to just $150. Click through to learn more about it. More »

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This is a guest post by Cinematographer Ryan E. Walters.

Welcome to Part 02 of Some Like It RAW, where I am comparing the Arri AlexaBlackmagic Cinema Camera, and the RED EPIC. My goal for these tests is to explore how each of these cameras handles real world shooting environments. Part 01 explored how these cameras handle IR pollution. In Part 02, I test the limits of low light levels, or underexposure. Continue on to watch the 11 minute video, read my summary, and get the downloadable RAW frames from each camera. More »

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It’s something many of us have come up against during one production or another: noise. We’re mostly talking about digital choma (color) noise, and not the much more pleasant grain texture of actual film (subjective, I know), or the less-obnoxious texture of digital luma (brightness) noise. Chroma noise is what rears its ugly head when we’re pushing cameras to the extreme, and for many of us, that means Canon DSLRs. In the tutorial below, Lucas Pfaff takes us through some of the camera settings and programs he uses to get the cleanest looking footage possible. More »

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On the left is a breakdown of the new iPad camera, and it has quite a few internal elements and an IR filter that should make for some quality 5 megapixel photos. While it doesn’t have the wow-factor that the iPhone 4S’s 8 megapixel camera does, it has something else that you may find interesting – and it was only hinted at during Apple’s press conference introducing the new iPad. That something it called Temporal Noise Reduction. I’ll explain what that means and why it’s important for small sensor cameras. More »

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When Red Giant Software released their latest Magic Bullet product, Denoiser, I wondered how it would compare to my plugin of choice for noise reduction, Neat Video. Now, thanks to Andrew Reid at EOSHD, I don’t have to do this comparison myself, as he’s just compared the two: More »

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Anyone who’s read the expanded PDF of the DSLR Guide knows that I use Neat Video for noise reduction. While the results are top-notch, I do have some issues with the plugin: namely, that it doesn’t take advantage of the host machine’s graphics card, and as such the render times can be quite slow. A new entrant in the video noise-reduction market is Magic Bullet Denoiser, which ships as part of the excellent Magic Bullet Suite 10. I haven’t had the chance to fire up the plug-in yet, but there are a few excellent reviews and tutorials already out there: More »