» Posts Tagged ‘nvidia’

Description image

GTX_Titan_Z_nvidia graphics card processing unit gpu processor video card high definition hd video 4kOver the last year or so, major software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and REDCINE-X have joined DaVinci Resolve in leveraging GPU power for improved performance. GPU acceleration coupled with greater native RAW format support and forward strides in GPUs themselves means good things for the future of independent media production. And concerning that last part about GPUs getting better, well, both NVIDIA and AMD had some pretty serious things to announce over the past week — NVIDIA with its $3000 dual-GPU GeForce GTX Titan Z, and AMD with its FirePro W9100 featuring 16GB of RAM. Check below for more details. More »

Description image

Vp9-logo-for-mediawiki.svg2014K Continues! When we last posted about the VP9 codec it was just beginning to threaten H.265 for dominance, but recent hardware partnerships with nVidia, ARM, Sony and many other tech giants solidifies VP9 as the next go-to HD and 4K streaming codec. Google’s previous VP8 codec failed to win out over H.264, which was already massively adopted by the time VP8 showed up. However, with this announcement Google looks poised to win this round of the knock-down drag out codec war. Will VP9 succeed where VP8 failed? Hit the jump to learn more. More »

Description image

One problem Mac Pro owners face is a lack of available nVidia graphics cards for creative professionals, which is important because of Adobe’s utilization of nVidia cards for Premiere Pro and other CS5 apps. Today, however, nVidia announced that their Quadro 4000 — a serious GPU based on their latest “Fermi” generation of chipsets, designed for 3D rendering and other professional uses — will be coming to the Mac Pro. This is a card for high-end post-production (not just in Adobe apps), and it’s great that it’s coming to the Mac Pro. However, while it’s a good thing for Mac Pro owners, it’s even better for Hackintosh builders. Here’s why: More »

Description image

It’s official: there are no nVidia options in the new Mac Pros. At the time of their announcement, some had speculated that Apple might slip in nVidia cards as a build-to-order option at launch, but nope: you can get one 1GB ATI card, or two 1GB ATI cards. That’s it. If you edit using Premiere Pro CS5, this is a problem, but if you’re a Final Cut editor, these new machines should be fine. Plus, if you run an editing house or work in front of clients, you can’t exactly run a hackintosh, in which case the Mac Pro is still your best option. So — where are the best deals on these new beasts? More »

Description image

Mac vs. PC is a never-ending debate, but when it comes to video editing, what we need are hard and fast numbers. It would be impossible to generate a comparison of apples to apples (zing?) by using Final Cut Pro, since that NLE is only available on one platform. Instead, Adobe’s CS5 suite is the ideal candidate — and considering CS5 is 64-bit native on both OSes, it should be a fair fight. The best way to settle this would be to open the exact same CS5 project file on a Mac and a PC, play it back, render it out, and measure it in other ways — on various machines, at different price points — and compare the results. If only someone would create such a benchmarking tool and upload the results to a database… As it turns out, someone has done just this. More »

Description image

Apple today announced new Mac Pros, marking the first updates to the fruit company’s pro line since March of 2009. Pricing starts at $2,500 for the base 4-core model, $3,500 for the 8-core model, and a wallet-annihilating $5,000 for the 12-core model. The new machines use the latest Intel Xeon processors, there are new SSD options for storage, and higher-powered ATI graphics cards are now standard. No USB 3.0 or Lightpeak as rumored, and still no Blu-ray option. None of this is particularly surprising, but there’s an interesting angle to this announcement concerning the ongoing feud between Apple and Adobe. More »