» Posts Tagged ‘opensource’

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Apertus AxiomWe’ve been covering the work that the fine folks over at Apertus have been doing for quite a while. In fact, just under a month ago, we got our first taste of footage from their early prototype camera, the Axiom Alpha, and it was quite promising. In the spirit of NAB, where multiple new 4K cameras have already been announced (see our constantly-updating NAB News article), Apertus thought it prudent to make a major announcement of their own. Today they unveiled the Axiom Beta project and gave word that a crowdfunding campaign is imminent, which means that an extremely affordable 4K open-source cinema camera might be in your hands before the year is through. Read on for details on this major announcement from Apertus. More »

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Apertus Axiom Alpha03_1It’s been a long road for the team over at Apertus, but they’ve reached a major milestone: they are recording footage and are finally showing it to the public. To put this into perspective, Apertus first announced their plans to build a camera from scratch nearly 2 years ago, and in that time with just a small group of people they’ve got a working product. It should be noted that for testing purposes the first step is getting HDMI recording working (though they will eventually use 3G-SDI and they did show off a 4K RAW image back in January – it’s just a lot of data to handle for full motion footage and that’s an end goal with the Axiom). Either way, it’s a huge accomplishment, so check out the very, very early prototype footage below. More »

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Apertus Axiom open-modules-concept-front-V1 croppedYou may have read some of our previous coverage on the Apertus Axiom Open Source 4K camera (not to be confused with Axiom Images who just shot RED DRAGON aerials), but the concept continues to improve. The team is hard at work on their prototypes, and while their module concept idea is not new, they are working on having the first open source camera with easily interchangeable mounts, sensor filters, and even image sensors. Click through for more on their open module concept and how they’ve expanded it. More »

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Apertus Axiom Modular Camera CompleteThe Apertus Axiom project, which is trying to build the first open source 4K RAW Super 35mm camera, has been making steady progress over the last year or so, with a significant amount happening in the last few months. The team has been working hard with the CMOSIS 4K sensor that will eventually be in a completed camera, and they’ve now delivered the first 4K DNG for all of you to mess around with. More »

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Axiom Alpha hardwareAbout a month ago, the open source Apertus Axiom camera project showed its first signs of life by sharing its open module concept ideas and camera designs with the public. This milestone took Apertus one step closer to meeting their self-imposed goals they’ve put in place to guide their project toward crowdfunding, and as of Friday, they’ve drawn ever closer by capturing their first images with their prototype and proof of concept for the Apertus Axiom , dubbed the Axiom Alpha. They’ve shared some of these images on their website, and discuss at length certain issues, like sensor defects, ghosting, and black specks, as well as a game plan for solving them. Continue on to see where Apertus is at with the Axiom Alpha. More »

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apertus axiom-modules-cinemadng 4k raw camera open source alpha prototype2In an age of 6K RAW and 2.5K for $2K cameras rapidly announced and released, it’s possible even for novel and notable concepts to fall by the wayside. Amongst the competition, I’m sure I was not alone in hoping against such a fate for the fully-open source Apertus Axiom camera project. A fully transparent and modular global-shutter Super35 CinemaDNG 4K with 15 stops of latitude and 150 fps at full-res is still a damn desirable piece of equipment. It now appears that the Axiom is showing its first signs of life with an improved modular design. Check out the details below. More »

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We’ve had a few posts revolving around open source 3D modeling & animation suite Blender recently, including some info on using it to model color space in three dimensions. Now, as a bit of a ‘BTW, FYI’ to a more recent post concerning the free release of all 4k F65 footage acquired for Blender’s CGI/live-action Tears of Steel, we have some info that may actually help you visualize that or any other 4k footage in full-res — without an actual 4k monitor. It isn’t perfect — it’s a bit rough and ready, and may require Linux, but we thought our readers should know that it’s possible, especially since very few of us have access to 4k viewing, be it through projection or UHD TV sets. Read on for some details on how the Project Mango team devised its ‘DIY 4k’ monitoring solution. More »

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The Blender Foundation is constantly pushing the boundaries of availability, openness, and access to the raw materials it uses to create its ‘proof-of-Blender’ animated shorts. This type of access is usually more associated with open source software than filmmaking, but especially since the Project Mango live-action CGI/VFX-heavy  Tears of Steel was realized, that distinction has become increasingly blurred. Now filmmakers, animators, or compositors looking to cut their teeth on professional-grade material have access to the entirety of Tears of Steel‘s footage, in 4k OpenEXR (in the ACES color space), courtesy Xiph.org. In the meantime, the Foundation has also made available a number of resources concerning their post-production pipeline, which allowed them to transcode 4K Sony F65 footage to those Linux-workable OpenEXR frames. Check below for more details. More »

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We told you back in July about the Apertus project and their goal to build the first open source digital cinema camera — not only that, but one that could match or exceed the specs of some of the other digital cinema cameras out there. This open source camera, the Axiom, will be capable of RAW high-speed 4K recording, and best of all, the software will be made open to the public so that the users can do whatever they want with it, similar to the Magic Lantern project, but without any hacking involved since it’s being made available for free. The team over at Apertus has been hard at work behind the scenes, and while their crowdfunding project for the camera will not start this year, they launched a website to detail the Axiom and the new Axiom Alpha, a prototype using the same sensor as the final camera. More »

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Just because you attempt to launch something on Kickstarter, does not automatically mean the project will be approved. In response to this, the development team for the Lockitron project (whose original startup was indeed rejected by Kickstarter) has released a new donation-based funding system, called Selfstarter — and since then has raised $1 million in pre-order sales using it. Selfstarter is fully customizable, clearly effective (compare that $1 million to the team’s original $150,000 goal), and — most importantly — free for everyone to use for their own projects. More details after the jump. More »

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Open Source doesn’t always have the greatest reputation in the filmmaking community, often because many believe it means unsupported and infrequently updated — and sometimes they’re right. We’re going to be getting the first open source camera, but open source software has existed for filmmaking for quite some time and there are plenty of options out there that can produce spectacular results, like the 3D animation program Blender. The Blender Foundation has been working with talented people to make films using the software, and Tears of Steel is their 4th completely Open Source film. How open? They are releasing all of the materials for the short film completely under a Creative Commons license (free to reuse and distribute with attribution). The film is streaming, and also available as an HD download (which is the way I’d recommend watching). More »

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It looks like RED, Sony, and Canon will be getting some interesting competition very soon. Apertus, the open source camera project that started in 2006, was designing a camera with all open source hardware and software using the small sensor Elphel camera. They recently announced that they’ll be building a brand new camera that is going shoot Cinema DNG files and sport a 4K Super 35mm sensor, 150fps at 4K, a global shutter, and the capability to get up to 15 stops of dynamic range using a process similar to RED’s HDRx. The best part of all — it’s open source, and they are planning on running a crowdfunding campaign to fund the project. More »

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Ever since Tramm Hudson hacked the 5D firmware, I’ve been wondering if some enterprising folks could buy a lot of large CMOS sensors wholesale and develop their own camera. After all, the RED camera is essentially a laptop computer (housed in the camera’s body) attached to an imaging chip. Apertus is one such open-source cinema project that began in 2006; here’s where the project stands today. More »