» Posts Tagged ‘optics’

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metabones speed booster lens adapter canon ef to mft micro four thirds m43Metabones has already provided shooters with a variety of Speed Boosters — lens adapters that optically counteract crop factor, increase light transmission, and in many cases even maintain smart lens control. Now, Metabones has announced a new addition to the Speed Booster line: a Canon EF to Micro 4/3 mount model that will effectively allow the Panasonic GH4 (and other Micro 4/3 cameras) to have the field of view of a Super 35mm camera and also increase your lens’ maximum exposure one stop. Metabones is also going to offer an equivalent adapter without the expensive optics just to control Canon lenses on your MFT cameras. More »

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The professional/semi-professional lens market is getting very competitive very quickly — which is great for filmmakers who are now using cameras that are much sharper than DSLRs, and need lenses that can match that resolution, and also provide smooth iris and focus. Schneider has been making PL mount lenses for some time, but they’ve now decided to introduce a full-frame cinema lineup with interchangeable mounts to go head-to-head against similarly priced lenses from Canon and Zeiss. Check out the FreshDV video below with Ryan Avery from Schneider: More »

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Various lens manufacturers are finally responding to the need for cinema-quality glass at an affordable price and in multiple lens mounts. Schneider already makes some Super 35mm primes, the Cine-Xenars, but they are coming out with a completely new product line called the Xenon FF Primes. As the name would suggest, these T2.1 lenses will cover a 36mm x 24mm full frame sensor — that’s right 5D users, that’s you, but that also means that a S35 sensor would be utilizing the sweet spot of each lens. Get the skinny after the jump.

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Not long ago, we shared some footage of the ‘birth’ of Nikon Nikkor lenses along with some of the basics of lenses in general. The question that follows is one of proper maintenance, both on and off set. Whether you own lenses yourself or you’re getting into camera department work, there are some practices considered standard protocol for keeping your glass clean. Below, professional AC Evan Luzi of The Black and Blue demonstrates how he cleans lenses on set, as well as what supplies an AC should keep on hand for doing so. Plus, if you are a lens kit owner, DIY Photography has some tips for preventing fungus from turning your optical glass into an accidental petri dish. More »

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Micro 4/3. Super35. Full Frame. And everything in between! There are a lot of needs for cinema lenses these days — and by cinema lenses I mean optics with manual aperture rings and focus gears — and, compared to the still lens market, not a lot of options. But while Schneider has announced new cinema lenses, I can’t seem to find many details about them. Here’s what we know: More »

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The tilt-shift effect is nothing new — if you’ve ever been a large format photography shooter you know how interesting it can look. It wasn’t until the Lensbaby line of lenses that tilt-shift really became widely used in everyday photography. DSLR video, on the other hand, brought a whole new group of users to the beautiful effects that can come from these lenses. There is an interesting project on Kickstarter right now for a tilt-shift lens called the Lynny Lens System. It’s nearing the end of its crowdfunding campaign and it’s aiming to be a cheaper alternative to Lensbaby. Check out more details as well as a sample video below. More »

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Digital cinematography often looks too clean to my eye, and I like “messing up” the images a bit (whenever appropriate). To this end, I bought a Lensbaby Composer Pro earlier this year, and, as always, my timing seems to be the opposite of impeccable: Lensbaby has just released a lens kit specifically for movie makers, aptly named the Movie Maker’s Kit. Here are the various lenses in action: More »

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Caleb Pike of DSLR Video Shooter has posted a nice tutorial for turning any old lens into a Macro lens. This process consists of attaching a diopter to the front of your lens, which allows you to focus on objects much closer to the camera than before. Note that these diopters — which come in different strengths — can be “stacked” to allow for maximum effect. Caleb explains the process and then shares some example shots: More »