» Posts Tagged ‘orsonwelles’

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John TollAll of us who are aspiring filmmakers have a list of films that inspire us. Maybe we’ve even got one film, or one specific shot, that singularly piqued our interest in the medium and inspired us to work within it. In a recent feature over on the Empire website, 21 of the world’s most respected cinematographers, everyone from Roger Deakins to John Toll, shared the films and shots that inspired them. Here are a few of my favorites from this fantastic list. More »

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Citizen KaneCitizen Kane: the #1 favorite film of 100% of freshman film school students and young lovers of cinema. (Remember Michael Scott’s nephew, Luke? Case in point.) Though the title of “greatest movie ever” is impossible to possess, Citizen Kane’s praises have become so commonplace that, unfortunately, some tend to take its cinematic command for granted — even though the film proved Orson Welles and famed cinematographer Gregg Toland to be real pioneers of the craft. Take a look at these incredibly insightful documentaries about the making of Welles’ masterpiece, and renew your appreciation for a truly groundbreaking piece of cinema. More »

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Welles Suiting UpIn his “boy wonder” days, Orson Welles staged nationally-recognized productions of Macbeth while still a teenager, frightened the country half to death with The War of The Worlds, produced/wrote/directed/starred in Citizen Kane at the age of 25, and then went into a slow, decades-long decline — struggling to find financing and autonomy from a Hollywood that was, to say the least, wary of him. The man had a career unlike anyone else. Welles had countless unfinished projects — among them The Dreamers, an adaptation of 2 short stories that he tried to make near the end of his career in the early 80s. The screenplay of this partially made film has become available to download, and it’s required reading for any Wellesophile, or anyone interested in great movies.  More »

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Can you look inside and see a murderer? A saint? A fascist? In this thought-provoking clip, Orson Welles shares some of his views on acting, and how great performances depend on the act of revealing — the ability to show those parts of ourselves that are the character.  Whether you agree or disagree, it’s worth checking out and pondering: More »