» Posts Tagged ‘plugin’

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musiDAvid editors and assistants working in long-format television or feature films know dealing with music can be cumbersome. Pulling large volumes of music tracks and tracking them through the licensing process can involve a lot of backtracking and headaches. Assistants need to scour the timeline to gather song titles, their start and endpoints, and how many times they were used, a manual process. It’s also limiting and inefficient for editors to sift through tracks without additional song details besides just their filenames. An AMA plugin called mus.iD that carries across the metadata embedded in the ID3 tag offers a solution. More »

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PE35_Pre-SyncEarlier in the month, Red Giant software introduced Universe, a new plugin platform that is also its own community. The biggest thing about Universe is that it is free to sign up, so you can get an idea of what it’s all about before committing any hard-earned cash. Now Red Giant is back with some updates to some of their most popular software, including PluralEyes, which is now integrated with BulletProof, and a new version of Magic Bullet Looks, which is now GPU accelerated and completely rebuilt on the Universe platform. More »

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darkenergylogoblogthm-224x134We’ve talked about the Cinnafilm Dark Energy de-noising plugin on several occasions. Most notably, Dark Energy played a crucial role in the post-production workflow of Shane Hurlbut’s DLSR-shot film Act of Valor. The good people at Cinnafilm also ran a Kickstarter campaign to judge interest in porting the plugin over to the OFX platform (which would have made it compatible with Resolve, Nuke, Avid, and a host of other applications). Even though that campaign didn’t succeed, the Dark Energy AE plugin is still one of the most wildly popular noise reduction/grain emulation tools on the market today. The only problem for most of us is that we’re not made of money. Luckily for us, Cinnafilm permanently slashed the price yesterday in honor of Einstein’s birthday.
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Red Giant UniverseHere at No Film School, we love Red Giant. Their lineup of filmmaking tools, from PluralEyes to the Color Suite to BulletProof, has made the lives of countless filmmakers so much easier and more efficient. So imagine our excitement when Red Giant started to hint at a major announcement, one that would surely see the launch of new tools that would be equally, if not more helpful than their prior products. Well No Film Schoolers, today Red Giant unveiled Universe, an innovative online post production platform/community that not only includes over 50 brand-spankin’ new effects and transitions, but the resources necessary for the platform to grow infinitely. In fact, Universe might just revolutionize the way plugins are created and distributed. Read on for the full story. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-02-14 at 12.44.28 PMDigital post-production has come a long way since the Avid machines of the early 90′s. Among the myriad post production tools that have surfaced in the past few years, none is more of a potential life-saver than Adobe’s Warp Stabilizer. However, despite the fact that it is fairly easy to get decent results with the plugin, it takes a little bit of know-how and practice to make Warp Stabilizer do its best work. Luckily, Jeremy Bircher over at the soon-to-launch story-driven stock footage hub, Story & Heart, has offered up the most comprehensive breakdown of Warp Stabilizer yet. Check it out. More »

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Hawaiki ColorApple threw us a major league curveball when they introduced FCPX a couple of summers ago. Not only did they re-conceptualize the notion of the timeline, they also completely changed the way we apply color changes to our footage. Although the new interface offers an interesting new take on color correction, for many people it doesn’t beat the simplicity of traditional color wheels. Luckily, plugin creator Hawaiki has introduced their new Color plugin which restores traditional color correction functionality to FCPX in a sleek and easy to use interface. More »

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darkenergylogoblogthmCinnafilm’s Dark Energy plugin for After Effects is arguably one of the best noise reduction and grain emulation tools on the market today. Most notably, Shane Hurlbut turned to Dark Energy in order to make the Canon 5D Mark II shine for Act of Valor, and high-end production companies around the world rely on Dark Energy for everything from noise reduction for green screen keying to film grain emulation. However, at this point in time, Dark Energy is only available as an AE plugin (and only on the PC). The folks over at Cinnafilm have just started a Kickstarter campaign to port Dark Energy over to the OFX platform so that it can be used in programs like DaVinci Resolve, Nuke, and Avid. Check out their campaign video below: More »

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If you thought Video Copilot’s Adobe After Effects plug-in Element 3D couldn’t get any better, then check out the new features the free 1.5 update is sporting: support for importing animated 3D sequences, real-time glow, new particle ordering and repeating options, ambient occlusion improvements, layer grid mode, and more. Feast your eyes on Andrew Kramer’s video below for a complete tour of what’s new in Element 3D: More »

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This past summer I wrote about the release and initial tutorials for Video Copilot’s awesome Adobe After Effects plug-in, Element 3D. Andrew Kramer has been slowly but surely releasing new tutorials for the plug-in that show off more aspects of its functionality and practical applications in After Effects projects. His three latest Element 3D tutorials delve into image based lighting, using video clips as textures to create screen animations, and making a field of random rocks as a part of a set extension. As an extra bonus, I’ve included some tutorials for the free open-source 3D modeling and animation program Blender, to get you started making your own objects for Element 3D. More »

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Last month I wrote about the new Adobe After Effects plug-in from Video Copilot: Element 3D. The initial demo videos were pretty amazing, but Andrew Kramer is delving deeper into Element 3D’s functionality in his most recent tutorial videos, covering the creation and manipulation of materials, powerful animation options in the Particle Replicator, environment maps, and 3D Compositing. And if that wasn’t enough, there’s also a tutorial from Serge Mustu on a Cinema 4D to Element 3D workflow and animating titles: More »

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If you thought the new 3D capabilities in Adobe After Effects CS6 were impressive, you haven’t seen anything yet. Andrew Kramer of Video Copilot just released the Element 3D Plug-in for After Effects CS3 through CS6 on both Windows and OSX. It’s a 3D object based particle array system with a fast Open GL render engine, and a simple yet powerful animation engine. Check out these demo videos to see Element 3D in action: More »

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About a year ago I was one of the first to call attention to an HDSLR plugin in development named 5DtoRGB. 5DtoRGB was designed to suck the utmost quality out of HDSLR files by transcoding them in 10 bits without using the ubiquitous, problematic, gamma-shifting Quicktime engine. Now beta releases of version 1.5 of the plugin are available for both Mac and Windows. Chris Marino takes an excellent video look at the new version: More »

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CoreMelt makes post-production plugins for Final Cut Pro, Final Cut Express, After Effects and Motion. V2 of their extensive plugin bundle ships with 219 GPU-accelerated plugins and costs $399, but they’ve also made 33 of them absolutely free. Here’s a look at the complete V2 product range, from which the 33 free ones are taken: More »

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Aliasing and Moiré. The bane of many HDSLR shooters’ existence. Many have tried and failed to defeat the jaggies and discoloration that reveal the ugly, line-skipping truth about our DSLRs. But now Jorgen Escher has released a Final Cut Pro plugin that can defeat some of these problems. While you shouldn’t expect Jorgen’s plugin to cure the most serious of aliasing issues, he’s come up with a post-production method that works by defining the problem areas and applying chroma blur. Here’s the before/after video: More »

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Anyone who’s read the expanded PDF of the DSLR Guide knows that I use Neat Video for noise reduction. While the results are top-notch, I do have some issues with the plugin: namely, that it doesn’t take advantage of the host machine’s graphics card, and as such the render times can be quite slow. A new entrant in the video noise-reduction market is Magic Bullet Denoiser, which ships as part of the excellent Magic Bullet Suite 10. I haven’t had the chance to fire up the plug-in yet, but there are a few excellent reviews and tutorials already out there: More »

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How are you transcoding your DSLR video these days? If you’re editing in Premiere Pro CS5, are you even transcoding at all? No matter your NLE, there are several options for transcoding, like Magic Bullet Grinder, the still-in-beta 5DtoRGB, and Canon’s own EOS Movie Plugin-E1 for Final Cut Pro. It looks like Canon’s going to be adding some interesting features to their free solution: More »

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I’ve covered a forthcoming DSLR post-production plugin known as 5DtoRGB before here (be sure to read the comments on that post for more info), but I would still call the plugin “little-known.” This is because the software — which transcodes DSLR footage to high-quality ProRes and DPX files — is still in beta. The previous version was restricted to processing a small number of clips, and only the first few seconds of each clip would be transcoded. However, Rarevision stopped by to let us know that the new version has no such restrictions. If they can deliver on the following featureset, I have a feeling the plugin will no longer be “little-known”: More »