» Posts Tagged ‘podcast’

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FARGO -- Pictured: Billy Bob Thornton as Lorne Malvo -- CR: FX/Matthias ClamerWhen I first heard that the Coen brothers’ iconic Minnesota masterpiece Fargo was going to be adapted into an FX miniseries, my first thought was, “Well jeez, that sure is a swell idea,” (in a thick Minnesotan accent, of course). After my initial excitement, the skepticism set in. How could anybody possibly create an episodic variation on Fargo, while appealing to modern audiences and paying homage to the original? Despite the enormity of that undertaking, show-runner Noah Hawley and his team not only created a show that lives up to the Coen classic, but a show that is easily one of the year’s (if not the decade’s) best. The show’s DP Dana Gonzales recently sat down with Ben Consoli on the Go Creative Show to talk about everything from Fargo’s locations to its glorious, yet understated cinematography. More »

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A Conversation with Jeff Nichols AFF part twoEarlier this year, I posted excerpts from my conversation with Jeff Nichols at the 20th Austin Film Festival and Conference, thanks to the generosity of AFF. Reading parts of the interview is nice, but I honestly believe you need to hear Jeff Nichols share his thoughts on writing and filmmaking in his own words. Now, thanks to AFF’s OnStory podcast, you get that chance. Using specific examples from his three films Shotgun Stories, Take Shelter, and Mud, Jeff Nichols talks about his approach to characters and writing/directing, and he also hints at how his upcoming film Midnight Special will be different from his previous work. More »

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Lawrence Kasdan Austin Film Festival On Story PodcastWhether staring at the blank page or struggling to cut 30 pages from a bloated first draft, every screenwriter has likely had the same thought: “This is so much easier for other screenwriters.” Guess what? It’s not easier for other screenwriters. Writing screenplays is hard. Sure, some screenwriters are very successful at writing great screenplays, but that doesn’t mean it was easy to write them. Don’t take it from me, though. Listen to Lawrence Kasdan tell you about the challenges he still faces today when he writes a screenplay, thanks to Austin Film Festival’s On Story podcast. More »

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Joke and BiagioAward-winning filmmakers and unscripted TV producers Joke Fincioen and Biagio Messina (you might know them as Joke and Biagio) have a long history of helping independent creatives by providing them with invaluable information on how to get past the velvet rope of Hollywood. Now that they have launched their new podcast Producing Unscripted, which aims to help you “create, develop, pitch, and sell unscripted television and film,” they’re going to do you one better — they’re going to let you pitch your ideas directly to them in the hopes of making a show together. More »

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Noah Baumbach Frances HaNoah Baumbach is a filmmaker whose character-driven narratives often find great depth out of simplicity, and his latest film Frances Ha pushes that sensibility even further. Shot digitally in black and white and lensed by Sam Levy, Baumbach notoriously did thirty or forty takes for many scenes in the film, in the hopes of finding “the one shot that tells the story.” Marc Maron recently gave an excellent podcast interview with Baumbach, going in-depth about his previous films, his path to becoming a filmmaker and his approach to creating a contemporary digital black and white film with Frances Ha. Hit the jump for the audio interview and watch the scene that took 42 takes. More »

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As aspiring screenwriters, we tend to look for tips, tricks, or shortcuts to improve our screenwriting, but inevitably we have to do the hard work of writing the story. Moreover, we want our unique voices to pop off the page, engaging and surprising our readers, and someone else’s rules for screenwriting (beyond the basics of story structure and screenplay format) may mute our unique voices. So, with this in mind, screenwriter Scott Frank (Out of Sight, Minority Report, The Lookout) shared his rules for screenwriting during his recent BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture. Note: these rules only pertain to Scott Frank, not to you. More »

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The Nerdist Writer’s Panel podcast, hosted and moderated by Ben Blacker, typically focuses on television writers. Since NFS focuses primarily on film, I haven’t featured this podcast here, but highly recommend it as a lot of fantastic narrative writing is happening in television today. In a recent Nerdist Writer’s Panel podcast, however, Blacker and his guest (and friend from seventh grade) writer/director Andrew Bujalski discuss how to make a living as an independent filmmaker today and over the past decade. During their wide-ranging conversation, Bujalski touches on the economic need to sell out, the tenth anniversary screening of his first feature film Funny Ha Ha, and the influential films of his youth. More »

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As filmmakers, we recognize that this medium requires a collaborative process, and the writer-producer-director relationship drives this process forward. The relationship that connects the creative triumvirate, however, can easily degenerate from a collaboration to an all-out tug-of-war. Perhaps the best way to support the writer-producer-director relationship is for each party to take the time to understand the needs and desires of the other parties involved. Thanks to the BAFTA New Filmmakers’ Market, producer Kate Ogborn (The Deep Blue Sea, Red Riding trilogy), screenwriter Rupert Walters (Restoration, MI-5 television series), and director Brian Gilbert (Wilde) share what they believe to be some of the best (and some of the worst) practices to manage the writer-producer-director relationship in podcast below: More »

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With this week’s limited release of Mike Birbiglia’s Sleepwalk With Me (which has apparently ruffled some feathers), a hybrid of personal memoir, storytelling and narrative film, I’m reminded of the power of a good story well told, regardless of form. As aspiring screenwriters, we should be looking beyond the boundaries of the silver screen (or computer screen, or TV screen, or mobile device) to hear how great stories captivate an audience and take them on an emotional journey. With that in mind, here are three storytelling podcasts that screenwriters should check out. More »

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Aspiring screenwriters are always looking for that pathway to success, the one that will open the doors to getting their scripts turned into films. The reality is there is no single pathway to success. Every writer has to forge a new trail. Nevertheless, we seem compelled to look to successful screenwriters to see if we can mimic at least part of their journey. To help us on this quest, screenwriter John Logan (Hugo, The Aviator, Gladiator, Any Given Sunday) has provided some helpful tips in his BAFTA lecture podcast. More »

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In terms of exploring subjectivity and how the mind works, Charlie Kaufman is perhaps today’s preeminent screenwriter. Either that, or he’s an expert in solipsism and desperate attempts to avoid it, which inevitably leads to becoming solipsistic and even more desperate attempts to avoid it. Either way, Charlie Kaufman is truly — truly — an original screenwriter, and one of my personal favorites. Kaufman’s perspective on screenwriting is obviously unique, and the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (better known as BAFTA) has posted a podcast of Kaufman giving a speech on what he thinks screenwriting really is. You can listen to the entire podcast here: More »

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As screenwriters, we spend a lot of time writing, re-writing, and obsessing over dialogue.  Let’s face it — the audience won’t read the amazing writing of our action sequences, but they will certainly hear our pithy dialogue.  But do each of our characters have a unique voice? Thanks to the ongoing generosity of John August and Craig Mazin, their most recent Scriptnotes podcast provides five tests to see whether a character’s voice is working.  See the five tests from the podcast below and my personal take on each: More »

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Hollywood’s accounting practices are so infamously convoluted that you could write a book on them. Two, in fact: author Edward Jay Epstein has written two books on the topic, The Big Picture: Money and Power in Hollywood and The Hollywood Economist: The Hidden Financial Reality Behind the Movies. I read his first book, but by this point my memory’s a bit hazy, so listening to the latest episode of the Script Notes podcast by screenwriters John August and Craig Mazin was a great refresher on the topic of where the money goes in Hollywood. More »