» Posts Tagged ‘post-production’

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Cutting Edge Tour

Here at No Film School, we love us some Saturday Night Live, and we’ve had the privilege of speaking with folks from the film unit who have generously showed us the inner workings of the show, from Academy Award-nominated DP Alex Buono’s cinematographic breakdown of the Wes Anderson spoof The Midnight Coterie of Sinister Intruders to the very talented editor Adam Epstein revealing the insane process of editing SNL shorts. As you might know, Adam is currently touring around the U.S. giving editing seminars that show editors how to go from empty timeline to broadcast-ready, including how to set up a workflow that really works for you, the basics of sound editing, grading, and delivery, and how to do all of this at breakneck speed. We got the chance to attend his Cutting Edge Tour during its stop in San Francisco, where we were able to pick his brain about all sorts of things, like what the SNL workflow looks like, which programs he uses, as well as what editors can do to grow and succeed as an artist. More »

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light iron michael cioni post production color correction grading dit digital imaging technician lily pad outpost todailies app film filmmakingA few weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the grand opening of Light Iron’s New York facility. I met very nice, dedicated, hard-working (and patient!) people there, and got a chance to hear words from Michael Cioni, the post company’s CEO. I also got a chance to scratch the surface of some of Light Iron’s infrastructure — including its LILY PAD DIT station — which aims to empower the on-set technician, and crew as a whole, with a seamless media experience. In addition to the hardware, this experience is supercharged by the likes of Light Iron’s custom Todailies app, which will receive an upcoming upgrade as well. More »

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We’ve seen a few apps capable of controlling different programs on your computer with an iPad. A recent app that caught our eye, ProCutX, is capable of controlling Final Cut Pro X with your iPad, and replacing many of the functions normally done with a keyboard. For a limited time (possible only a few more hours), the full app, which is normally around $25, is now free on iTunes. Click through for a video walk-through of ProCutX. More »

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The keyboard can certainly be a powerful and efficient control surface for non-linear editing, especially with the mastery of hot-keys and short-cuts. Despite this, some editors desire a more visually intuitive way of interfacing with their NLE. There are those that prefer specialized color-coded editing keyboards or keyboard covers, while others swear by their tactile controllers. Those can go for around $80, but what about using an infinitely configurable iPad to take the place of one of these consoles? We’ve already seen one iOS app capable of controlling a wide range of video software, but with a new iPad app called ProCutX, Apple editors have yet another way to turn their tablet into a Final Cut Pro X console. Check out some images and details below. More »

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We’ve all seen it: mismatched subject and background lighting, dancing edge pixels, and color spill; some of the hallmarks of a bad green screen composite. There are multiple factors to consider for a chroma key shot in preproduction, on set, and in post, and in the following videos Richard Harrington will take you through those factors and show you how to pull a good key and produce a believable composite. More »

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One of the great features in Adobe After Effects CS6 is its built-in 3D camera tracker, which helps realistically integrate CG elements into footage that have a fair amount of camera or subject movement. But what if you want to do a 3D match move shot, and you can’t afford a copy of After Effects? Not a problem. Andrew Price of Blender Guru has a great hour-long video to get you started with 3D tracking and compositing CG elements in the free open source 3D program, Blender: More »

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It was announced in April that Lightworks, the high-end editing application favored by Oscar-winning editor Thelma Schoonmaker, was going open source. They’ve now delivered on their promise, with a free open source beta now available. At the same time, The Foundry, best known for their high-end compositing application Nuke, have released a free public beta of their forthcoming RED post-production solution Storm. More »

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Serious colorists don’t use a mouse; they use a much more capable hardware control surface based around three trackballs that control lift, gamma, and gain. These hardware devices are important because they give the colorist control over multiple push-pull adjustments at the same time. Such surfaces have traditionally run $25k or more, but Tangent Devices managed to get this triple-trackball interface down in price to $1,500 with their Wave Control Surface released last year. Now they’ve created a brilliant virtual version using the iPad’s multi-touch screen. Here’s a video of the interface in action, and instructions to get the free application: More »