» Posts Tagged ‘postproduction’

Description image

Adobe Creative CloudDespite the controversy surrounding Adobe’s switch to a subscription-based model, its Creative Cloud line of products has seen several useful updates for users. For instance, Adobe has added native RED DRAGON & CinemaDNG RAW support via GPU acceleration, plus improved round-tripping with its color correction software SpeedGrade. This year at NAB, Adobe pushed forward with the addition of some newly native abilities, in addition to the dynamic linking its suite is already known for (i.e., no switch from PP to AE needed for certain effects, and vice-versa). Check below for our NAB 2014 interview with Adobe and a video recap of the newest iteration of CC features. More »

Description image

The EditorWe live in an age where a 6-year-old with a laptop and a copy of iMovie can edit some footage together. Editing software is abundant and as easy to use as it has ever been, and the masses are using these tools to flood the internet with copious amounts of video content. But most of us can agree that simply being able to make edits does not necessarily make a person an editor, at least in the sense of the editing being a creative art form. However, it’s sometimes not clear what exactly an experienced editor can do, and what impact they can have on the final product of a film. Inside the Edit, a brand new online editing course, has put together a short video that demystifies the complexity of an editor’s job. More »

Description image

Resolve 11 EditingBlackmagic Design is on a roll at this year’s NAB! In addition to the major announcement of two new camera systems – the URSA and the Studio Camera - Blackmagic also unveiled version 11 of their world-renowned color correction software, DaVinci Resolve. The new version contains a plethora of exciting new features, but most notably, and somewhat unsurprisingly, Resolve 11 has over 70 new editing features and is now a full-fledged editing solution! Check out the details below. More »

Description image

Gone GirlEarlier this week, Adobe unveiled the features that will be rolling out in the next version of their Creative Cloud video apps, and the response thus far has been an incredibly positive one, especially for features such as DCP creation in Media Encoder and masking/tracking directly in Premiere. However, Adobe released quite a bit of other new information about their video products on Wednesday, most notably the fact that David Fincher’s upcoming film, an adaptation of the Gillian Flynn novel Gone Girl, is being cut exclusively on Premiere Pro by Kirk Baxter ACE. Will this be a major turning point for Adobe’s filmmaking software in regards to its use in Hollywood? Let’s take a look. More »

Description image

Creative CloudIn 2012, Adobe unveiled the future of their software distribution strategy. Despite some initial hiccups in public perception, Creative Cloud has since taken the video post production world by storm. In addition to the monthly fee structure, Creative Cloud offered another major benefit over the Creative Suite — the ability for Adobe to push out major software updates and new features with a previously unheard of regularity. Now that NAB (filmmaker Christmas) is finally rolling around for another year, Adobe is releasing their next round of major features for their video-centric software, and let’s just say that the future is bright. More »

Description image

PE35_Pre-SyncEarlier in the month, Red Giant software introduced Universe, a new plugin platform that is also its own community. The biggest thing about Universe is that it is free to sign up, so you can get an idea of what it’s all about before committing any hard-earned cash. Now Red Giant is back with some updates to some of their most popular software, including PluralEyes, which is now integrated with BulletProof, and a new version of Magic Bullet Looks, which is now GPU accelerated and completely rebuilt on the Universe platform. More »

Description image

Green Screen Premiere ProWe all know how important lighting is in the process of shooting a subject against a green screen. However, having the ability to pull a solid key from any footage (whether it’s well lit or not) is perhaps one of the most important skills for somebody to have in the world of post-production. This is especially important considering that many low-budget editors are now becoming the one man bands of the post-production process. Luckily, programs like Premiere Pro include a plethora of effects that can be used to pull a fantastic key every single time, and without the need to leave your NLE. More »

Description image

DaVinci ResolveIn the process of narrative filmmaking, a talented cinematographer can achieve the desired aesthetic through closely controlling the characteristics of light, color, and composition. In these cases, color correction shouldn’t really be needed (although a creative grade can certainly take the image to another level). In documentary filmmaking, however, where many of the images are captured sporadically as the action unfolds (which can very easily lead to mismatched footage), the process of creating a unified aesthetic is usually left to the colorist. Luckily, John Ryan Seaman of GranolaTech has some excellent tips for grading your documentary-style footage that should help get you up to speed on the core concepts and techniques for color correction. More »

Description image

FCPX Mac Pro Maxed OutLate last November, Apple upped the ante with their video editing solutions when they released the long-rumored redesign of the Mac Pro alongside a major update to FCPX, one which was specifically engineered to provide maximum performance in tandem with the new machines. We’ve already seen some preliminary tests of the performance of this hardware/software combo, and the results were pretty convincing. However, the folks over at fcp.co went above and beyond the previous tests and pushed the new Mac Pro and FCPX to their absolute breaking point. Their results, which are pretty damn crazy, shed quite a bit of light on just how powerful this combo is. More »

Description image

darkenergylogoblogthm-224x134We’ve talked about the Cinnafilm Dark Energy de-noising plugin on several occasions. Most notably, Dark Energy played a crucial role in the post-production workflow of Shane Hurlbut’s DLSR-shot film Act of Valor. The good people at Cinnafilm also ran a Kickstarter campaign to judge interest in porting the plugin over to the OFX platform (which would have made it compatible with Resolve, Nuke, Avid, and a host of other applications). Even though that campaign didn’t succeed, the Dark Energy AE plugin is still one of the most wildly popular noise reduction/grain emulation tools on the market today. The only problem for most of us is that we’re not made of money. Luckily for us, Cinnafilm permanently slashed the price yesterday in honor of Einstein’s birthday.
More »

Description image

Red Giant UniverseHere at No Film School, we love Red Giant. Their lineup of filmmaking tools, from PluralEyes to the Color Suite to BulletProof, has made the lives of countless filmmakers so much easier and more efficient. So imagine our excitement when Red Giant started to hint at a major announcement, one that would surely see the launch of new tools that would be equally, if not more helpful than their prior products. Well No Film Schoolers, today Red Giant unveiled Universe, an innovative online post production platform/community that not only includes over 50 brand-spankin’ new effects and transitions, but the resources necessary for the platform to grow infinitely. In fact, Universe might just revolutionize the way plugins are created and distributed. Read on for the full story. More »

Description image

Screen Shot 2014-02-14 at 12.44.28 PMDigital post-production has come a long way since the Avid machines of the early 90′s. Among the myriad post production tools that have surfaced in the past few years, none is more of a potential life-saver than Adobe’s Warp Stabilizer. However, despite the fact that it is fairly easy to get decent results with the plugin, it takes a little bit of know-how and practice to make Warp Stabilizer do its best work. Luckily, Jeremy Bircher over at the soon-to-launch story-driven stock footage hub, Story & Heart, has offered up the most comprehensive breakdown of Warp Stabilizer yet. Check it out. More »

Description image

kendricken_celluloid_film_fuji_fujifilm_production_manufacture_cancelWith modern digital cinema cameras, it is often preferable to achieve a look that is more “cinematic” than “digital.” No one factor creates a filmic feel, but the precedent is simple enough — film itself. The emulation of emulsion may depend on anything from lens choice and lighting to grading and grain plug-ins, but there is one sure-fire way to get a true film look: using film. Celluloid acquisition may be beyond the budget of your shoot, but using a “film intermediate” process — that is, transferring color corrected digital footage out to film, then scanning back to digital — could be one technique for splitting the difference. A webinar with VFX artist & colorist Jerome Thelia details just such a process, regarding the Oscar-winning short film Curfew. Read on for details. More »

Description image

Stillmotion Photograph StorytellingChances are that if you’ve ever tried to incorporate still photography into your filmmaking, you’ve most likely used what has become known as the “Ken Burns Effect” wherein you keyframe various properties of the photograph in order to make it appear as if the camera is panning and zooming with the photo. While this is certainly a helpful tool when using photographs in your film, it’s not particularly exciting in a visual sense, and it’s been done so much that the technique itself is somewhat trite. Because of this, using large amounts of photos in a film presents a bit of a creative challenge, a challenge that our friends at Stillmotion encountered and tackled head-on for their recent feature documentary, #standwithme. How’d they do it? Stick with us to find out. More »

Description image

macpro-2013-open-100058793-largeIn the past few weeks, we’ve covered the release and the early reports of the performance of the new Mac Pro extensively. From what we’ve seen to this point, it doesn’t seem like a stretch of the imagination to say that these machines will become fairly ubiquitous in the filmmaking world over the next year or two. However, there’s one aspect to this story that we haven’t yet covered, and that’s the economic debate of performance vs. price, especially in regards to people who use these machines as the foundation of their creative businesses. Our friend Chris Potter over at Screenlight (a video-sharing software for video pros) has written up a fantastic post about how to make the best economic decisions for your creative business as you look to purchase new hardware. More »

Description image

Dede AllenAs David Lean said, “The editor is the final author of the film.” These days, with Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Avid, et al., the most indie, low-budget indie filmmaker has NLE options never before available, but prior to the mid-90s, every feature film was edited by hand. And, surprisingly for the “old-boys” world of Hollywood, many of films’ most prominent editors have been women. Of the old-school generation of female editors, perhaps no one exemplified the art better than Dede Allen, a trailblazer for editors like Martin Scorsese’s career-long editor, Thelma Schoonmaker. Continue on to hear some of your favorite filmmakers on the art of editing. More »

Description image

Editing Video editing is one of the more personal facets of filmmaking in that no two people do it exactly the same way. We all develop our own media workflows, our own ways of organizing projects, and we all cut differently. Unfortunately, sometimes the editing habits that we develop aren’t necessarily the best, and sometimes they’re just straight-up lazy and they don’t help us do our jobs to the best possible extent. Luckily, a new year is right around the corner, which means that it’s time to start making resolutions and to start working on giving up the bad editing habits that have been holding our work back. More »

Description image

5SecondFilms LogoIt’s happening! It’s finally happening! The Digital Bolex team, after their years-long journey from conception to finalized product, has at last released their D16 digital cinema camera into the world. We’ve already seen the first major review from our very own Joe Marine. However, Joe (Rubinstein) and Elle have been making their way around the country debuting the camera and putting it into the hands of eagerly awaiting filmmakers. Some of the first filmmakers to put the D16 into their workflow are the extremely funny folks over at 5SecondFilms, a Los Angeles-based comedic filmmaking troupe. In a guest post on the Digital Bolex blog, 5Second filmmaker, Tim Ciancio talks about his first practical experience with the D16. More »

Description image

Pomfort ClipHouseThe flexibility that RAW images provide filmmakers in the post-production process is absolutely astounding. However, in the words of Bret Michaels, “Every rose has its thorn.” The thorn, in this case, is the fact that RAW files can make your workflow quite a bit more cumbersome than it ever would be with compressed codecs. Despite Premiere Pro’s recent addition of native support for Cinema DNG files, more often than not it still makes more sense to create proxies and use an online/offline workflow. Even though there are  solutions for processing RAW files, many people still feel that RAW is more trouble than it’s worth because of the post-production headaches. Well not any more, because Pomfort’s highly anticipated RAW processing software, simply called ClipHouse, has now hit the market. More »

Description image

Hollywood Titles tutsNailing the opening title of your film is important for a number of reasons. Usually it’s the first thing your audience sees on-screen that introduces them to your story, which means that it has to capture its tone and prepare your viewers for what is about to unfold. They don’t necessarily have to be intricate undertakings (Lars von Trier’s simple opening title from Antichrist is probably one of my favorites), but if you want to learn techniques that will help you create something epic, Aetuts+ shares some tutorials that break down how to recreate the titles from some big Hollywood movies. More »