» Posts Tagged ‘projector’

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expanded symphony projectorEver since the Lumiere brothers projected their first film to the public — a train arriving at a station — cinema burst into the world as the newest and most populist art, beating out books, theater, and radio. Today, where is the popular future of movies headed if films become increasingly relegated to a small, elite group of people who get to make and watch them? Jose Carlos Zavarse Pinto and Irene Garibay are setting out to bring movies to a small village in Venezuela. And no, it’s not to show them the latest comic-book-smurfs-street-racing blockbusters, but rather, to have them create their own cinema. Below, Jose talks to No Film School about his project, and how filmmaking can be used to preserve or promote culture across the world. More »

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The dream of any independent filmmaker is to one day project their film in pristine detail on the big screen. For many, this means hooking up an HD projector to a laptop and projecting on a less-than-optimal screen with less-than-optimal audio. If you are fortunate enough to have the money to rent out a real theater or you have access to one, there’s a good chance that theater is going to be using a digital projector that takes a DCP (or Digital Cinema Package). Unfortunately, they are not cheap to make — but if you’re willing to go the DIY route, there is now open source software called OpenDCP that will allow you to make cinema quality DCPs. Filmmaker Danny Lacey has a very thorough walk-through of the process in the video below. More »

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Sony plans to ship a 4K home theater projector, the catchily-named VPL-VW1000ES, for 25 grand in early 2012. Given the $13.50-a-ticket price to see a movie here in New York City, I’ve found myself disappointed at a few recent films where the image felt soft. Sony is on the record about 4K in theaters (PDF link), and I’m convinced that it is indeed the future for the big screen. But at home? I have a 720p projector in my apartment, and it looks pretty damn good. I can only imagine that 1080p would look better, and I don’t know that I could ever tell the difference between 1080p and 4K. Still, that’s not stopping Sony — and RED — from pushing 4K projection in the home. More »