» Posts Tagged ‘quentintarantino’

Description image

Tarantino & SmithWhen thinking about the filmmakers that carried the torch for independent cinema in the 90s, the names that immediately come to mind are Quentin Tarantino and Kevin Smith (and Robert Rodriguez, of course.) Both directors offer great insight into what it means to man the helm of a film project, including the importance of communicating your vision, and what the job of a director is really all about. Continue on for this incredibly important video from filmschoolthrucommentaries. More »

Description image

Fleisch_EnergieThe world of experimental or avant-garde (vanguard) cinema has a history just as rich as narrative film (it could be said that the two run on parallel tracks). While usually associated with European filmmakers, America has its own rich tradition of avant-garde and experimental filmmakers. Very loosely defined as any film that doesn’t use narrative cinematic technique to achieve its goals, the avant-garde is worthy of study for any filmmaker or student of film. The Dissolve recently featured two experimental avant-garde shorts — one by the filmmaker who made the amazing credits for Enter The VoidClick below to learn more about the history of the wonderfully strange world of avant-garde and experimental cinema, and watch some of its classics. More »

Description image

Carpenter and RussellAs a director, what is your job? It’s a simple question, but deceptively so, almost like a zen koan (what is the sound of one clapboard clapping?) While most everyone else on a movie set has a clear and defined role, the director’s job description is a nebulous thing, and if you ask fifty different filmmakers, you might get fifty different answers. Click below to see what John Carpenter had to say to Kurt Russell about directing and “vision,” as well as advice from Terry Gilliam, via the always entertaining Quentin Tarantino. More »

Description image

Alisa LepselterWoody Allen’s films are known for many things, but editing isn’t necessarily one of them. Which isn’t to say that the cutting in a Woody Allen film isn’t excellent, it’s just not something that calls attention to itself, except for rare occasions like the beautiful black and white shots that open Manhattan. And it’s his unobtrusive cutting style that has helped subtly define his films, with simple switches from a single to an over the shoulder changing the emotional tone of a dialogue scene without the audience even noticing. Invisible editing is everywhere, of course, but Woody’s working methods are famously unique, and now Alisa Lepster, his editor for 15 years, talks about the process of this legendary writer/director and how to cut a Woody Allen movie. More »

Description image

Quentin TarantinoWritten on the 2nd page of the screenplay for Reservoir Dogs is a list of names — Timothy Carey, Jean-Luc Godard, and John Woo to name a few. These are individuals that Quentin Tarantino wished to highlight and laud in his first feature film. The entire film was dedicated to these, to use his word, “inspirations”, and in an interview from 2002, Tarantino sat down to talk about who these people were to him creatively and how they impacted his life and filmmaking career. Hit the jump to watch the interview. More »

Description image

If ever there was a screenwriter that was fun to read, but really shouldn’t be emulated, that screenwriter would be Quentin Tarantino. Of course, that hasn’t stopped several screenwriters from trying, but it’s a fool’s errand (for that matter, it’s a fool’s errand to emulate any screenwriter). On the heels of several awards nominations, The Weinstein Company is revving up its tried-and-true awards machine and has recently churned out the screenplay of Django Unchained as an early holiday gift for your consideration. More »

Description image

It’s no secret that many directors have “signature shots,” or shots that they tend to use (or even overuse) in their films. Vimeo user kogonada has edited together three brilliant mashups of some of the signature shots of Stanley Kubrick, Quentin Tarantino, and Wes Anderson. As a community of filmmakers, I think we can all agree there is something to be learned from how the greats make use of these shots. Hit the jump for the first video, which shows Kubrick’s use of the One-Point Perspective: More »

Description image

It’s film awards season (here’s an ongoing scorecard), which also makes it a good time to reflect on your personal favorites from the past year. I wish Netflix would let me sort the films I’ve rated by the date I rated them, which would allow me to provide an easy answer to “seen anything good lately?” Even this very handy script does not allow that. But I have some issues with Netflix, and this post is not about them but about Quentin Tarantino, who recently shared his own personal top 10 movies from 2011: More »