» Posts Tagged ‘redcine’

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davinci-resolveRED has held back for quite some time letting other manufacturers use 3rd-party hardware acceleration in their software with RED’s proprietary .R3D codec, but that time has now passed. In the new 10.1.3 update for Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, GPU acceleration is now supported with RED files, which will mean faster workflows for anyone not already using a ROCKET or ROCKET-X card from RED. More »

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REDCINE-X PRO Without ROCKETWhile proprietary used to be the name of the game, we are entering an age where camera systems and post solutions are choosing more open source options for maximum compatibility (and a likely wider install base as a result). Look no further than the increasing use of CinemaDNG with cameras like the Ikonoskop, Blackmagic Cinema Camera, and Digital Bolex. Now it looks like RED is at least partially entering that arena with an update to REDCINE-X PRO. More »

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Most everyone can agree that 4K footage downscaled to 1080p looks great. Even cameras that don’t shoot 4K are often oversampling in order to output a clean 1080p file. However, when you’re shooting 4K or 5K on a RED camera and you’re outputting a 1080p file in post, it turns out not all downscaling is created equal. While RED has just released a tutorial on how to export footage from their grading software, REDCINE-X, they barely mention the Software Scaling setting, and so I did some testing myself: More »

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If you’re a RED owner or you’ve been following the company, you know that they’re constantly updating their hardware and software to add more functionality as well as fix bugs. One of the bigger releases recently was an update to their color science which included a new color preset that supposedly can give great results without much fiddling. It should be noted that the other cameras competing in the high-end cinema space, the Sony F65 and the Arri Alexa, have both also been receiving a steady stream of firmware updates that also add functionality. For example, the F65 added playback in-camera not too long ago — so it’s clear that these high-resolution cameras require a bit more engineering since they are basically computers with lenses. For what’s new in version 3.3, check out the video below: More »

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As noted previously, RED has a new color science and gamma curve for their RAW-shooting cameras: REDgamma3 and REDcolor3. The new color science comes with a new camera firmware — version 3.0.0, which is a release build (not beta) for both EPIC and SCARLET — and there’s a new version of REDCINE-X as well. RED’s Jim Jannard explained the color science updates with the following — note that if you’re doing a full grade, your gamma setting will still be REDlogfilm, but you should expect to employ the new color science alongside that gamma curve: More »

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One thing I’ve been wondering about since getting a RED was what I was going to do about workflow. REDCINE-X Pro is a really nice (and free) color grading application. But you’re not going to do secondary color correction or really complicated masking/keying in it (yet). So how does one use it in conjunction with a NLE? Do you render out files, take them and edit them in Premiere Pro, and then color correct files that you’ve already rendered? Don’t you sort of lose the whole idea of a RAW workflow by doing that? Turns out there’s a better way. More »

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RED has been cranking out new beta versions of their ingest/grading software REDCINE-X PRO seemingly every week or so, and you can bet it will find a lot of new users thanks to the impending release of their SCARLET-X camera (which is supposed to start shipping this Thursday). REDCINE-X PRO is free — though you need a very expensive piece of hardware to use it — so here is a great tutorial from Dan Kanes, which demonstrates the flexibility of the RAW workflow: More »

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In a hypothetical future wherein I start shooting on a RED camera, one of the first things I was planning on doing was getting The Foundry’s Storm post-production (and on-set) software. The RED folks really seemed to love it, as they were quoted on the Storm product page, and at this year’s NAB I was impressed by The Foundry’s numerous demos (some of which took place in RED’s tent). But then RED released REDCINE-X PRO this week — their own version of Storm, in a lot of ways — and now The Foundry has officially killed Storm, at a nascent version 1.04. While Storm was priced very affordably, putting it well within the range of indie filmmakers — $375 — REDCINE-X is free, and you can’t beat that. Via fxguide, here’s the official word: More »

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Lots going on in REDland this week. The news that EPIC-X production had begun is now corroborated by news that the first cameras are headed out the door today. On top of this, RED released REDCINE-X PRO, a new version of their free .R3D processing/grading software. I’m a bit confused — I mean, I thought REDCINE-X was already for pros only and that soccer moms need not apply — but apparently this new version is significantly different enough to justify the new “pro” moniker. After booting it up briefly, I understand the new name — the unified interface is a vast improvement over the old version (and the multi-track timeline builds on its basic editing functions). Here are the new features (and a download link): More »