» Posts Tagged ‘remotecontrol’

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Camera technology is not the only reason it’s an exciting time to be a filmmaker. Manufacturers such as AJA, Atomos, Blackmagic Design, Convergent Design and others offer increasingly inexpensive solutions for bolstering and customizing camera workflow — especially when it comes to external media recording and monitoring. Some of these devices provide functionality shooters have long sought after, and still others bring capabilities some of us may never have even dreamed of. The Teradek Cube is one such device, and here is the first part of my full review. More »

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lenzhound wireless lens motor control system wireless follow focus kickstarter camera shooting filmmakingOur recent post on the Redrock microRemote made it pretty clear that the desire for an even more inexpensive wireless follow focus solution is very real. As it would turn out, there is a very affordable alternative with significant momentum on Kickstarter — the Lenzhound Wireless Lens Control System. Going for under $400, the Lenzhound is also notably based on the Arduino open source electronics system. With these powers combined, Lenzhound might just be the most affordable wireless lens control system aiming for ‘pro.’ Read on for the Kickstarter video and more details. More »

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There a few neat ways to remote operate your DSLR — and in some cases, live-monitor as well. Options range from custom Canon control software for your Android tablet all the way to professional, dedicated solutions. Most such offerings are Canon-only, but statistically there’s a good chance you’re a Canon DSLR shooter anyway — and there’s no reason similar gear won’t come to Nikon or Panasonic cameras, too. Pro accessory fabricators LockCircle have just announced a new, advanced option for remote control of your Canon DSLR called the K-CIRCLE – allowing wireless or USB-tether remote operation of everything from ISO and aperture to focus and digital zoom. More »

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There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »