» Posts Tagged ‘richardlinklater’

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Richard Linklater Writing Boyhood 1Now that Richard Linklater’s film Boyhood has expanded to 771 screens across the U.S. and cracked the top 10 at the weekly box office, I had the opportunity to see this 12-year opus on its opening weekend here in Albuquerque. After watching this boy grow up on-screen in what feels like a blink of an eye — sometimes actually seeing him change dramatically in a quite literal blink of an eye over a cut — the screenwriter inside me wondered, “How do you write a movie that takes twelve years to shoot?” Here on No Film School, we’ve explored Linklater’s overall approach to filmmaking and screenwriting as well as his particular relationship with film and time via his Before trilogy (thanks, V Renée!). Now, thanks to many resources, we hear from Linklater himself on how he tackled the challenge of finding and writing the story of Boyhood over the course of its 12-year production. More »

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Richard LinkaterRichard Linklater is a DIY filmmaker hero for many reasons. He’s self-taught, completely obsessed with cinema and making films, and his approach to telling stories is one that I think many can relate to. And if you were just thinking about what an experience it would be to actually be able to sit in a room and pick his brain about all of this, you’re in luck. Linklater answers a bunch of questions from a small group of folks for one of Fox Searchlight’s Searchlab lectures, which gives us an inside look into how the director goes about writing screenplays, rehearsing with actors, and working on-set. More »

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Criterion CollectionThe Criterion Collection offers a lot more than access to some of the best and most historically significant films from around the world (and great supplemental features, too). The site also provides studious cinephiles with its own extras, like engaging articles about these classics and their world-class filmmakers, as well as their Top 10 lists, which share the favorite Criterion films of some of the biggest creatives, who explain why they’re important to them personally and professionally. Continue on to see which classics filmmakers like Jane Campion, Christopher Nolan, Martin Scorsese, and Roger Corman put in their top 10. More »

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Richard LinklaterVery few filmmakers manage to capture the very essence of cinema, the definition of which has tortured the minds of so many great classical film theorists. Is it art? Is it reality? Is it expression? Is it impression? To me, its essence is time. BFI’s Sight and Sound beautifully ponders director Richard Linklater’s romance with cinema and time in a short video essay, which reflects on the temporal bond of his films, which are less sequential still images of captured light than poetic soliloquies about existence, about life — about time. More »

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Richard LinklaterUnlike a lot of other professions, filmmakers aren’t required to go to film school and graduate with a degree in filmmaking in order to find work in their field. In fact, many of the greatest filmmakers either dropped out or never attended college/film school, like Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino, and Stanley Kubrick. Self-taught filmmaker Richard Linklater, in less an interview than a private soliloquy, expresses some very inspirational thoughts not only on filmmaking, but on life as a creative person, being a lifelong learner, and living day-to-day as a person who is obsessed with cinema. More »

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SONY-BDOS-01_Onesheet4.16.13_Layout 1Richard Linklater may be the only filmmaker in history to have written and directed three films about the same two romantically involved characters, with each film documenting a single day’s time, and with each film occurring nine years from the last — Before Sunrise (1995), Before Sunset (2004), and Before Midnight (2013, released yesterday). And, as it happened to turn out, the industry climates surrounding the creation of each film were unique, even though the style (and size, in dollar signs) of the films themselves has stayed pretty much consistent. Read on for Linklater’s thoughts on the industry that changed in a process right alongside the characters — and why, to him, not bothering with major studios can be a time-saver nowadays. More »