» Posts Tagged ‘rig’

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Iris Rod Support Standards 15mm 15mm LWS 19mmIn the flooded market of new camera accessories, one can easily become confused as to which support gear is best for which camera setups. Iris rods should be found on almost every camera setup in the world, but which sizes and spacings should you use? Read on to clear up any confusion you might have between ARRI’s three rod standards: 15mm LWS, 15mm and 19mm Studio. More »

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Prieto C500 WideThe Canon C500 is one of those cameras that hasn’t been readily adopted by the film industry, at least not to the extent of ARRI and RED products. Sure, it played a very small role in the production of Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, and Shane Hurlbut chose it as his A-Cam on Need For Speed, but for the most part, it doesn’t get much love in the narrative filmmaking world. However, world-class cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto ASC, AMC, (The Wolf of Wall Street, Argo) recently lensed a short film called Human Voice on the high-end Canon camera, and offered his take on why it was the right choice for this project, and how specifically it was set up for this film. More »

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trost durable field camera slider shooting platform movement steel 01The DSLR revolution ushered in an explosion of one-person-crew gear options, and the slider has been no exception. Many manufacturers offer variations on the basic yet effective sliding camera platform, including Redrock, edelkrone, DitoGear, and Rhino. Now, a manufacturer called Trost is introducing a very sleek-looking slider aiming for extreme dependability and durability. Trost sliders feature hand-machined steel components, a quickly adjustable design, and the strength to support (some of) the weight of a 1983 Toyota Tercel. If you had any sliders on your holiday wishlist, you might want to check below for more details. More »

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52 gopro bullet time rigWe’ve seen the bullet time effect achieved through many methods. In terms of low-end tech and budget, you’ve got the inventive ceiling fan/GoPro technique, and on the high-end you’ve got the innovative 12 Teledyne DALSA Falcon2 multi-viewpoint technique. However, somewhere in the middle lies the action camera array approach, and Devin Graham and his team took 52 of GoPros, built a specialized circular rig, and filmed dogs running through it with some pretty cool results. Check out the behind the scenes video as well as the finished product after the jump. More »

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Enforcer_Marauder1Compact run-n-gun shoulder rigs are nothing new, and there are a multitude of companies that make excellent solutions for shooters who are on the move. However, oftentimes these rigs contain a plethora of small pieces that need to be fastened together before you can use them, and how long this process takes can be the difference between getting the perfect shot and missing it entirely. Zacuto is looking to eliminate build-time with their new foldable, highly compact DSLR rigs, the Marauder and the Enforcer. Check them out below: More »

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Jeremiah Warren bullet time rigThere aren’t many things cooler than a really well-done bullet time sequence, which is probably why we like to cover it so often. If you’ve seen our other bullet time posts, both on the technological advances of multi-viewpoint camera setups and DIY rigs, then you might’ve been bummed out that the technology is either unavailable, too expensive, or too time-consuming. But, here’s some good news. Though currently you can’t make a legit bullet time rig without using lots of cameras, setup, and time, you can get something close to it by using a 2×4, screws, a GoPro, and a ceiling fan — and the result will look great for your low-budget projects. Hit the jump to see how. More »

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While hand-held shooting has basically been around since there was a camera light enough to do so, it’s safe to say that the Steadicam (which is technically a Tiffen name) constitutes a cinematographical revolution all its own. Hand-holding dates back as early as 1911, but it was a long time before cinema gained the dolly’s fluidity of motion coupled with the hand-held operator’s freedom of travel. Audiences would first meet the ‘Steadicam shot’ in 1976′s Bound for Glory, and the first impressions were enough to earn the film an Academy Award for Cinematography. Larry Wright of Refocused Media recently created a supercut called The Art of Steadicam, paying homage to the ground-breaking invention and the artists who helped reshape the possibilities of cinematic movement — check it out below. More »

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Danny Dodge is a cameraman and cinematographer who has devised what may be the most light-weight and portable curved dolly track system you’ve ever seen. Searching for a way to build the ultimate portable dolly setup, Dodge stumbled upon the fact that a draw string could be used to arch PVC track to any degree he wished. The SnapTrack Cinerails rig was the result. Combining a simple draw string device with seven Cinerails gives you up to eight feet of curvable dolly track that seems primed for low-impact DSLR shooting, weighs under ten pounds, and breaks down/sets up in about a minute. Check out the SnapTrack Cinerails below, and some pre-ordering info if you’re interested. More »

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Since the explosion of DSLRs, shoulder rigs have become almost a necessity for smooth handheld work. Some you can buy on the cheap, others you can build yourself for even cheaper, and one can even double as a portable jib solution. Name brand rigs will save you the trouble of a DIY assembly job, and should hold up well enough to use on just about any shoot, but they’ll cost you quite a bit more. Now we’ve got another how-to video, this time geared toward shooters who’d like to build their own somewhat heavy-duty shoulder rig for as little as $100. Check out the video and the full eBay items list below. More »

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We recently featured several practical but effective techniques for creating the (by now) famous Matrix-esque ‘bullet-time’ effect — accomplished, in more than one case, by using an evenly spaced array of GoPros and some post-processing elbow grease. Clearly, the availability and portability of such cameras is catching on beyond conventional ‘action cam’ uses, and inspiring creatives of nearly any budget to create shots only A-budget Hollywood productions used to be able to pull off. GoPros make sense for such arrays, because they are forgivingly frameable (and decently affordable as far as rentals go). Now, another project has demonstrated what’s possible with these simple but adaptable cameras — in this case, built into a rig that can also be handheld. More »

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There’s a variety of rigs out there for pretty much all your mounting needs — Cinevate and of course Kessler are go-to solutions for jibs running the gamut from heavy-duty to collapsible, respectively. The same goes for shoulder rigs, with options ranging from professional solutions to lightweight prefabs all the way down to homebrew kits. Of course, something that can pull double duty as a portable jib and custom shoulder rig — which you can put together yourself for $50, to boot — may be the best of, like, three worlds. Read on to check out some details — plus info on how to build your own 360 degree panoramic head mount, plus some hardcore DIY stabilizers — all geared toward the low-to-no budget but crafty shooter. More »

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As a longtime owner of a Redrock shouldermount rig, a recent announcement from the accessory manufacturer almost makes me wish I had instead waited the eight-some-odd years to spring for the package today. Actually, it’s still pretty good news to me, and any other current rig owners, for that matter — because what’s announced isn’t a new Redrock rig unto itself, but instead upgrades for key components for any shouldermount setup. Bump the jump for the details. More »

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If you want to do steady handheld work with most small cameras — like DSLRs — a shoulder rig is almost a must. They vary in price rather drastically, and they come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. There are plenty of budget rigs around, some from better known companies than others, but not many of them can break $100 as a starting price point — but that’s exactly what the Filmcity FC-10 Shoulder Rig does. Click through to check out a video showing off the rig. More »

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Let’s face it, unless a camera is designed to go on your shoulder, it’s either going to need some sort of rig, or you’re going to have to get creative to achieve maximum stability. Not only that, but many of these smaller cameras don’t have any good way for you to grab them quickly. That’s where Redrock Micro’s ultraCage product line comes in. They’ve introduced two new cages that are specifically designed to fit snugly around the Blackmagic Cinema Camera and the recently announced Canon C100. They’ve also come up with the lowBase, a great solution to add rails to tall cameras without increasing the height of your rig. If all of this weren’t news enough, Redrock is also offering a 10% discount — exclusively to NoFilmSchool readers. More »

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Zacuto has been getting quite a bit of coverage lately thanks to their controversial (or not, depends on who you ask) Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout 2012. That particular shootout saw relatively inexpensive cameras go up against the best in the business in both a creative and empirical test. Besides being a rental house, Zacuto also makes a ton of rigs and support gear for cameras, and they’ve come up with some interesting designs for the much-anticipated Blackmagic Cinema Camera (which is hopefully less than two weeks away). Check out the video below featuring Steve Weiss and Jens Bogehegn. More »

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There are plenty of interesting designs for follow focuses out there, and some just take the basic design and make it cheap and sturdy. Edelkrone is known for coming up with fascinating solutions to problems that exist with filmmaking gear, and the FocusONE PRO is no exception. If you’re using DSLRs and doing all of the shooting yourself, this looks like it could be a really innovative way to get marks quickly that can be repeated relatively easily. More »

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Catclaw Power Adapter for DSLR or Blackmagic Cinema CameraOne of the big questions with the forthcoming Blackmagic Cinema Camera is what people will use to power the camera after the internal battery is depleted. While the Cinema Camera has a fixed internal battery similar to the just-released Macbook Pro, it has a 12V-30V DC port which will allow you plug in any compatible power source to not only power the camera, but also charge the internal battery. If you’re looking for an inexpensive device to accomplish this, there is an interesting product called the Catclaw, which has a 15mm rod clamp, 5V, 7V, and 12V outputs, and takes Sony or V-Lock batteries. More »

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We’ve already shown off one of the cheaper wireless follow focus systems from JAG35. Now Redrock Micro has partially redesigned their microRemote Wireless Follow Focus system by developing their own motor and creating a new controller (in addition to the iPhone controller). They’ve also got a rig system called the ultraCage that is designed to be form-fitting to cameras like the Canon C300 or the Canon 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III. I had a chance to talk with Brian Valente and Loren Simons at the Redrock NAB booth, and you can see that video embedded below. More »

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I saw some nifty rigs from edelkrone at last year’s NAB, and while I haven’t done any real-world shooting with their products, their latest rig caught my eye: the aptly-named Pocket Rig claims to be the “World’s Most Compact and Light DSLR Rig.” Here’s the release video: More »