» Posts Tagged ‘rogerdeakins’

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DeakinsI’m not sure that anybody necessarily needs to be reminded of why Roger Deakins is perhaps the greatest cinematographer of our era. Not only has he crafted the images in a majority of the Coen Brothers’ modern masterpieces, but he has been at the helm of many of the most gorgeous films of the past 20 years. But just when you think you couldn’t possibly admire the man and his body of work any more than you already do, something comes along that puts his prolific career into perspective, leaving you in awe. A recent tribute video from Plot Point Productions does just that. So sit back, relax, and prepare to experience Deakins’ cinematography like you never have before. More »

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PrisonersOne of the things I appreciate about cinema is that films are enigmatic. Many times the films we see when we’re kicking back and watching as passive spectators are not the same films we see when we sit up, pen and pad in hand, and unfurl the cinematic message in its entirety. This video essay by Darren of Must See Films attempts to unearth all of the subtle ways director Denis Villeneuve and legendary DP Roger Deakins try to communicate through the film Prisoners. It breaks down many aspects of the film, like the blocking, costuming, and aesthetic choices, as well as its symbolism, motifs, and patterns, offering a richer, more well-rounded understanding of not only the film itself, but of just how complex and intricate visual storytelling actually is. More »

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Roger DeakinsRoger Deakins is one of the most highly regarded cinematographers living today (which is probably why we like to talk about him here at NFS). He has photographed  aesthetically breathtaking films such as The Shawshank RedemptionFargo, and No Country for Old Men (he has been nominated for 11 Oscars, but he has yet to win a single one), and has always been very open and willing to share the wisdom he has picked up throughout his almost 40-year career. In a very helpful, very inspiring BBC News article, Deakins shares his top 10 tips for young cinematographers, and we’ve chosen a few gems to share with you. More »

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John TollAll of us who are aspiring filmmakers have a list of films that inspire us. Maybe we’ve even got one film, or one specific shot, that singularly piqued our interest in the medium and inspired us to work within it. In a recent feature over on the Empire website, 21 of the world’s most respected cinematographers, everyone from Roger Deakins to John Toll, shared the films and shots that inspired them. Here are a few of my favorites from this fantastic list. More »

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The GrandmasterWhat qualifies as great cinematography to you? The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have certainly run the gamut in their nominations for Best Cinematography; the group of honored films consists of a diverse selection of stories told by some of the most talented DPs of our time, which makes one wonder — what does the “best” cinematography look like anyway? Fandor has put together yet another compilation of footage from this year’s Oscar nominees in cinematography in an effort to dissect, break down, and study each of their visual artistry. More »

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GRAVITY

In the past four years, the Academy Award for best achievement in cinematography has gone to a film with heavy amounts of computer-generated-imagery three times. In 2009, Avatar took the top prize in cinematography, followed by Hugo and Life of Pi in 2011 and 2012 respectively. These films, while visually stunning in every sense of the phrase, don’t necessarily conform to the traditional definition of cinematography because much of the time the lighting, composition, and camera movement are created digitally by a group of compositors. This begs the question, should there be a distinction between traditionally-shot films and digitally crafted ones? Or has the definition of cinematography changed as digital technology has become more prevalent? More »

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biggles_deakinsJust about every cinematographer will tell you the same thing: their work wouldn’t be half as good without the help of their most trusted gaffer. This can be attributed to the fact that lighting successfully for film and television is one of the most challenging aspects of production, and the larger the scale of a production becomes, the more intensive the lighting needs will be. John Higgins is one of the industry’s leading gaffers, and he has worked to light some of Hollywood’s biggest films alongside some of today’s most accomplished DP’s such as Emmanuel Lubezki and Roger Deakins. Higgins recently sat down with thecallsheet to discuss the lighting philosophies behind some of the biggest films that Hollywood has to offer: More »

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Cinefii BSDCinematography is a lot like alchemy. It’s one part science, one part art, two parts teamwork, and maybe a little voodoo sprinkled in for good measure. Cinematography is one of those practices that is so multi-faceted, yet so subjective, that it is nearly impossible to be a true master of the art. However, it’s quite possible to find, define, and master your own voice as a DP, and that’s what many of the greatest cinematographers in history have done. Cinefii has put out a series of short videos called “Bite Size Dailies” which feature interviews with some of the leading DP’s in the industry. In these interviews they expound on various questions which should be of use to all of us aspiring cinematographers as we try to find our own cinematographic voices. Here are a few of my favorites: More »

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Roger Deakins is no stranger to this site, but that’s because he’s been extremely generous throughout his career about giving advice and trying to help those who are just starting out (in fact that’s why he started a forum). If you aren’t an Academy Award-nominated Cinematographer (I’m guessing you aren’t), Roger Deakins has some sage advice for you. Check out the video below. More »

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You might have already seen the previous behind the scenes that we posted for the Roger Deakins-lensed and Sam Mendes-directed Skyfall, but now we’ve got a more traditional video blog/making of that goes beyond raw on-set footage, and actually gets into the entire process for the production of the film. While the videos are short, they’re a little under 30 minutes in total, so sit back, relax, and catch up on some Bond, James Bond. More »

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Have you you ever wondered what a twenty minute montage of making a James Bond film (and the first digital one at that) would look like? Fortunately, the web provides. I’m usually rather apathetic towards Bond movies before the fact — but this raw, unnarrated behind-the-scenes footage has got me pretty intrigued about the upcoming Skyfall. For one thing, there is some really exciting stunt-work going on in these clips, even with all the wires and safety cushions still un-rotoscoped away. And for another thing — actually, on second thought, we’ll get to that later — these videos have been going on and off-line, and being so clearly unstable, there’s really no time to waste. If you want to check them out, read on. More »

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Roger Deakins (The Shawshank Redemption, No Country for Old Men) is arguably one of the greatest cinematographers of the last 20-30 years (if not one of the greatest all-time). His work is timeless in a way that is hard to describe, but much of it comes from his ability to paint with light. Deakins had shot all of his work on film up until Andrew Niccol’s In Time, which he lensed on a prototype Arri Alexa. We covered back in February of 2011 an interview with Deakins where he stated that “film had a good run” and that he wasn’t sure if he would ever shoot film again. Now he’s taken on a much larger project with the camera, the new James Bond film Skyfall, directed by Sam Mendes. Mr. Deakins recently sat down with Franz Kraus, the Managing Director of Arri AG at this year’s IBC trade show. More »

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Roger Deakins, ASC is up for a cinematography Oscar this year for lensing the Coen Brother’s masterful True Grit, and according to Deakins himself, it might be his last movie shot on film. Deakins — whose other credits include The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, No Country for Old Men, O Brother Where Art Thou?, and The Shawshank Redemption — has been nominated for nine cinematography Oscars but has never actually won one (really?). Coming from the legendary cinematographer, who up until now has never shot digitally, it’s not just another “film is dead” quote. More »