» Posts Tagged ‘selfpromotion’

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BitTorrent Bundle

BitTorrent, a tech company whose name is commonly and incorrectly associated with pirating, has been running a legitimate business since 2004 with over 2 million pieces of licensed content in the BitTorrent download manager, which serves more than 170 million people monthly. The company is now beginning to launch a new endeavor to empower those in the content creation business. BitTorrent Bundle provide a way for creators large and small to have all the advantages of the peer-to-peer protocol while also maintaining control over their content by creating ‘gates’ that must be unlocked by the consumer. We had a chance to chat with Matt Mason, VP of Marketing at BitTorrent, who is very impassioned about what this new publishing platform could potentially mean for creators. Read on for the interview and get the full scoop: More »

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Sometimes it seems like the numbers of services allowing for film self-distribution are expanding so rapidly it’s a bit overwhelming, or at least a little difficult to keep up with. This type of flooding can really only benefit the filmmaker, though, seeing as each project’s release vector can be paired with the most appropriate service instead of being stuck choosing between a mere few. It may be time to add another notch to your list of options, because now — with the help of film-centric audience builder-organizer Crowdstarter — a service called PUMit is looking to get your film out into the world, get ticket revenue straight to your wallet, and provide you with all the tools to do so successfully along the way. More »

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Being an independent filmmaker usually requires one to wear a lot of different hats — not only during the production process — but also in the arenas of promotion and marketing. It’s hard work to build your audience from the ground up, and NoFilmSchool has covered this topic in multiple posts that will hopefully make this process somewhat easier and more understandable. But while we have explored audience building on YouTube quite a bit, we haven’t really gone into using social networking sites as much. However, in his recent webinar Richard Harrington talked to Scott Bourne — one of the most followed photographers on Twitter and Editor of PhotoFocus.com — about the best methods to use for audience building on Twitter. More »

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A global pandemic breaks out just in time for Halloween… and election season. More »

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Slowly but surely outlets for online media distribution are blossoming — with some major players finally rolling out monetization options and others already in place. We’re starting to not only have the ability to self-distribute, but also pick what’s best for us from among some healthy competition. One of the more recent developments in pro-creator content delivery systems (that’s PCCDSs — can that be a thing from now on?) is VHX distribution, not to be confused with VHS distribution, which is completely different. VHX originally began as a video sharing social media platform, which is very functional but still largely in its infancy. In addition to this service, however, VHX has already proven its potential for media monetization with its first two web releases — both tailor-made for the client and DRM-free. Click through for the full low-down. More »

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Augmented Reality has been slowly making its way into our lives, mostly in the form of demo videos, games, and Google’s forthcoming Glass project. But Aurasma is a cool little app that puts the tools to create AR content into the hands of everyone, and has implications that could put an interesting twist in filmmaking for the web: More »

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It’s more likely than not that you’ve heard of Pinterest — the fast growing social media network that lets folks create an online scrapbook of images they can share or re-share with others.  Being such a visual medium, it’s no surprise many filmmakers are exploring ways in which they can put this new social media tool to use.  With that in mind, here are 5 ways filmmakers can use Pinterest to their advantage: More »

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Independent Film Week (IFW) takes place every September in New York, and it’s a whirlwind event chock full of panels, screenings, networking events, and meetings. One part of IFW is the Project Forum, wherein filmmakers meet with financiers, producers, distributors, and other enablers. Films participating in the Project Forum range from those in the development stage to those in need of finishing funds. I’m happy to announce that 3rd Rail, the transmedia project I’ve been working on with Zack Lieberman (my co-writer/director on The West Side), has been selected to participate in the No Borders International Co-Production Market. More »

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First off, my write up of this year’s Full Frame Film Festival is live at Filmmaker Magazine; give it a read. More important than my writing, however, are the films themselves, so here are some trailers for the great docs from this year’s Full Frame: More »

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Seen: Greenberg

03.26.10 @ 12:00PM Tags : , ,

Noah Baumbach’s latest feature Greenberg, starring Ben Stiller, opens nationwide in theaters today. I edited some behind-the-scenes promos for the film, such as this clip:


I did the titles and transitions in After Effects; they’re hand-drawn masks with the “Wiggle – gelatin” behavior applied.

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I’ll have more from this weekend’s terrific Script to Screen conference in the days to come, but for now, a meta-update.

On the web, my name is often misspelled, and in person, no one knows how to pronounce it (even though it’s phonetic). So at the start of the panel I spoke on, Writing for a New Landscape: New Media & Cross-Platform Opportunities, I ripped my name placard down the middle, eliminating the “Bilsborrow.” I placed the two end pieces together, and in doing so, changed my public-facing name to Ryan Koo (I’m not legally changing it). My logic: “In terms of personal branding, you have to have a name that people can spell.”

Mobilizing audiences from project to project is an increasingly important component of realizing a self-sustainable career, so this move seems like a no-brainer. As a filmmaker, or as any kind of artist, your name is more important than any corporate brand. The music industry is learning this the hard way: “Nobody really cares about Sony records or Universal. You don’t seek out stuff that’s being released on Universal as a fan.” But you do seek out a band or individual’s work. When I saw a recent article that attributed Avatar to “20th Century Fox,” I just shook my head; no one outside of the film business cares that it’s a 20th Century Fox film. They care that it’s a James Cameron film.

Afterward, I opened the guide to read about the next panel, and immediately realized I’d done the right thing: there in the conference guide was my name misspelled as Ryan Kilsborrow-Koo.

[Photo from eisenw]

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I’ll be speaking on a panel titled “Writing for a New Landscape: New Media & Cross-Platform Opportunities” at IFP’s upcoming Script to Screen Conference. The conference explores new opportunities available to independent filmmakers and directly connects aspiring and working filmmakers to the decision-makers of the film, television, and digital media business. Here are some of the presenters:

Catherine Hardwicke (TwilightThirteen, Lords of Dogtown), Steve Bodow (Head Writer, The Daily Show), Brian Koppelman (Solitary Man, Rounders, Ocean’s Thirteen), Peter Hedges (What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?, About a Boy), Adam Brooks (Definitely Maybe, Wimbledon), Monty Ross (Do The Right Thing), along with representatives from Focus Features International, the Sundance Channel, Filmmaker Magazine, and more! Like Ryan Bilsborrow-Koo and Zachary Lieberman, who wrote The West Side two years ago and haven’t been heard from since, thanks to the evil machinations of the film industry!1

The conference takes place Saturday and Sunday, March 20th and 21st at 92Y Tribeca (200 Hudson Street). For IFP members, tickets to the conference are $150; for non-members, $200. However if you use the special nofilmschool code FREE2010 you can get the member rate as a non-member.2

Writing for a New Landscape: New Media & Cross-Platform Opportunities will be an interesting panel, as I suspect most of the helpful information Zack and I can impart comes from our experiences shopping our feature-length, transmedia screenplay for Third Rail, rather than from our experiences producing the DIY The West Side. Regardless, I promise our panel will be interesting, and I might even wear pants.

  1. I added that last sentence. []
  2. Okay, the code is not specific to nofilmschool. However, it will save you $50. []