» Posts Tagged ‘sensors’

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CropperCapture[90]We’ve all heard it. “If only (fill in the blank) camera had a full frame sensor, I’d be able to use it.” Or, “The image from the GH4 sure is great, but I just couldn’t get used to a Micro 4/3 sensor.” If you’ve spent any time reading editorial comments about digital cameras in the past 5 years, then you’re almost certainly familiar with these types of statements. While different sized sensors can provide substantial differences in both aesthetic qualities and low-light performance, the argument that’s most often thrown around in these discussions is about “crop factor,” or the relative field of view from one sensor size to the next. Personally, I think it’s about time we put the issue of sensor size into perspective so that we can stop making goofy, arbitrary statements like these. Zack Arias over at DedPxl agrees, and his new video does a fantastic job at providing that perspective. More »

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sony curved cmos sensorDigital imaging sensors are traditionally small, flat devices that convert images, which are focused onto the sensor by a lens of some sort, into an electronic signal that can then be processed in numerous ways. With very few exceptions, every digital sensor in use today is flat. However, in a few year’s time, that may not be the case, as Sony’s device manager Kazuichiro Itonaga recently showcased two new curved CMOS sensors, one a 43mm full frame sensor and the other a much smaller 11mm 2/3 size sensor. These new sensors are reportedly up to twice as sensitive as traditional CMOS sensors, and they have the potential to make our lensing systems simpler, faster, and sharper. More »

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Canon 35mm sensor firefliesLast March, Canon riled up the filmmaking community when they announced their full-frame 35mm CMOS sensor that can literally see in the dark. Canon has just released an amazing video of the sensor capturing footage of Yaeyama-hime fireflies — images captured in an “exceptionally dark shooting environment.” Check out the video after the break. More »

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graphene-image-sensor-2Technology is downright crazy. To think that we have affordable digital cinema cameras in the present day that blow away the digital cameras that were being used in Hollywood eight years ago is bordering on absurd. Not only that, but technology is progressing at such a rate that everything is nearly outdated the moment it hits the market. And that trend doesn’t look like it will change any time soon. A team of scientists in Singapore have recently developed a graphene-based sensor that is 1000x more sensitive to light than current CMOS and CCD designs. What does this mean for the photographic and filmmaking industries? Do we really need them? More »

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You might be thinking, how much more light-sensitive can video cameras really get if the sensors don’t get much larger? Well, if you’re Canon, the answer is a lot better. They’ve just announced a new full-frame 35mm sensor that absolutely swallows up light, and it’s specifically made just for video. We may not be seeing it in our cameras just yet, but it’s definitely a breakthrough kind of technology for the world of video, and opens up all sorts of possibilities for available light shooting. Check out the video Canon posted on their site below. More »

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The most common way we get color images with digital cameras is with a Bayer pattern CMOS sensor, but there are plenty of variations on that design being used today. The upcoming Aaton Penelope Delta uses a Bayer pattern over a Dalsa CCD, for example, while the RED EPIC-M Monochrome uses the MX CMOS sensor foregoing color filtration entirely. By their very nature, though, color filters of any kind cut down the amount of light transmitted to the sensor. That’s why Panasonic is developing a brand new type of color filter that will employ diffraction to split up the color spectrum, instead of filtration, and thus will be capable of doubling the light sensitivity of the sensor. More »

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In a move that surely has absolutely nothing to do with Sony’s new cameras, RED has announced price drops on the EPIC and SCARLET cameras. They haven’t said exactly how much the prices will drop, but they will be sharing those details on October 31st November 1st — which is again, completely coincidentally, the day after Sony will announce their new camera(s), speculated to be the F5 and F55. This is reminiscent of when RED announced the SCARLET the same night as the Canon C300 in that RED has clearly taken a class in Headline Stealing 101 — and by going second, they get to make last-minute adjustments based on their competition (and by being a much smaller, more agile company they can pivot more quickly). They also recently shared some updates on their Dragon sensor. More »

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While you might just be catching your breath after getting caught up with all of your 1080p, or even 2.5K devices, 4K cameras at the budget range are going to come fast and hard from the major manufacturers. JVC was the first out of the gate with a less than stellar solution, but there was no question other companies were working on the technology. Now we’ve got confirmation straight from Sony about what’s right around the corner for lower-end 4K cameras. More »

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Do you know how your sensor translates light into the data that later becomes your images?  How does the physical construction of your sensor affect how pixels get interpreted?  This little video is a great introduction into how CCD (charge-coupled device) sensors work in a digital camera, and gives a peek into the cool stuff happening under our noses at 24fps: More »