» Posts Tagged ‘sonyf3’

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There are a number of slow motion sequences in my script for Man-child (only 8 days left… !), which makes a RED appropriate. Otherwise I would probably try to shoot it on a Sony F3 with the S-Log firmware (if the campaign is successful, that is… ). All the footage I’ve seen to date shot in S-Log has been beautiful, with very film-like highlight renditions and gorgeous colors. A common misperception with S-Log is that you need an uncompressed recorder to take advantage of it. Not true! DP Timur Civan recently ran some tests with a Ki Pro Mini: More »

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Sony’s paid S-Log upgrade for its F3 camcorder has been out in the wild for a while now, but to date no one has released a scientific test of how much extra dynamic range the $3,600 upgrade adds to the camera. Abel Cine has just done so, and they find the firmware takes the camcorder from from 12 to 13.5 stops (which is awfully close to ARRI ALEXA territory — and that camera costs $75k). Here’s the test: More »

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I was supposed to post this a week ago, but you know how Real Life can be. So here, better late than never, is my second (and final) roundup of all the filmmaking gadgetry shown at Cine Gear 2011 (part one is here). This time, let’s check out a whole bunch of stuff from Cinevate, D | Focus, Sekonic, and more. More »

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The first episode of Zacuto’s anticipated sequel to the Emmy award-winning Great Camera Shootout 2010 is now available. This year’s installment is a bit different than last year’s, as it’s actually a documentary on the Single Chip Camera Evaluation conducted by Robert Primes, ASC. The cameras tested include 35mm film (Kodak 5213 and 5219 stock), the Arri Alexa, RED ONE M-X, Weisscam HS-2, Phantom Flex, Sony F35, Sony F3, Panasonic AF100, Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 1D Mark IV and Nikon D7000. More »

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Well, this is interesting. Sony’s $14,000 F3 camera has all manner of professional HD-SDI outputs, including S-LOG with a $4,000 firmware upgrade. You’d therefore expect Sony’s $5,000 FS100 to ship with a more limited set of outputs, and it does — to an extent. While the FS100 only has a “consumer” HDMI output, there are some interesting things about this particular HDMI output. The same goes for the documentary-friendly HXR-NX70 and the twin-lens stereoscopic HXR-NX3D1 as well — but don’t get your hopes up, as that asterisk in the title comes with some disclaimers. What is it about these HDMI outputs that are unique? More »

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Just because the latest single-sensor digital camcorders allow you to shoot with available light does not mean you should shoot with available light. However, the importance of being able to should not be overstated. To that end, John Brawley put together a great practical test utilizing six different cameras in the same setting, in order to evaluate which format would work best for a forthcoming feature to be shot mostly on Parisian streets at night. The cameras/formats were Aaton 35mm, Aaton Super 16mm, ARRI ALEXA, RED ONE MX, Canon 1D Mark IV DSLR, and the Sony F3. Here’s the video of the test, which is refreshingly devoid of test charts and instead focuses on the devices as storytelling instruments: More »

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Sony has released version 1.1 of the F3′s firmware, which adds simultaneous HD-SDI/HDMI output, ND filter color correction, Planning Metadata (file naming convention schemes), and other new features. They’ve also released the much-touted S-LOG upgrade, the tongue-twisting CBK-RGB01 paid upgrade, which adds awesome uncompressed output capability — for a price. More »

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The folks at AbelCine have put the prosumer Sony FS100 through the same tests to which they subjected its professional cousin, the Sony F3, and have discovered some interesting things. First of all, it seems the FS100 gets about 10 stops of dynamic range as opposed to the F3′s 12 stops. But the FS100 has higher sensitivity settings, which let it reach the equivalent of an astounding 16,000 ISO. Here’s the chart that AbelCine came up with, to translate Sony’s video-centric “db gain” settings to the filmic ISO rating to which many are more accustomed: More »

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The Sony F3 has a wealth of image adjustment options, befitting its pro price tag. Users can create custom scene files and upload them via SxS card, and while I’m sure we’ll be seeing hundreds of custom styles released in the coming months (none of which have any effect should you shoot in the upgradeable S-Log mode), AbelCine is the first to my knowledge to release ten styles of their own: More »

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At this year’s NAB, a number of conferences and seminars were running just outside the show floors. One of the seminars I circled on my list was the Sony Super 35mm Seminar, put on by Vortex Media’s Doug Jensen, and I stopped by briefly only to get pulled away to another event. Sony has now posted the full video of the seminar; if you’re already familiar with both cameras, this likely won’t impart a ton of new information, but if you’d like to sit back and get an overview of both the Sony F3 and Sony FS100, here you go. More »

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Philip Bloom, Kessler University, and Documovie.co.uk have conducted a shootout between the Panasonic AF100, Sony F3, and Sony FS100 (with a Canon 5D Mark II thrown in for good measure). As Philip states on his site, this is not meant to be a scientific test, as is the Single-Chip Camera Evaluation being released later this year, but the tests are a good watch for anyone considering these camcorders: More »

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The Sony F3 is a $13k professional camcorder, upgradeable via paid firmware upgrade to a $16k “even more professional” camera with a 4:4:4 S-LOG output. The Sony FS100 is the more compact, $5k prosumer version of the F3. However, despite the price difference, the two cameras share the exact same sensor. So are those initial negative reviews of the FS100 justified? It appears not. In the words of tester Alastair Chapman, “The FS100 is remarkably close to the F3. You would have no problems cutting between the two of them in a project.” Here’s a video comparison of the two: More »

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While I was catching some Zs at NAB, the guys from Next Level Pictures and a number of shooters who have appeared on this site in the past (Vincent Laforet, Jared Abrams, Timur Civan, Tyler Ginter) were off testing the Sony F3′s S-Log firmware upgrade. This is the first time the uncompressed outputs from the F3 were enabled outside the walls of Sony (in this case, they were recording to a Cinedeck), and the footage should demonstrate greater latitude than the default F3 settings. Here’s the test: More »

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FilmsDaMente has posted some beautiful uncorrected Sony F3 footage shot in Portugal, using nothing fancier than the stock 4:2:0 35Mbps codec. Some of these shots (by Nuno Rocha and Victor Santos) are downright painterly, and make one wonder about the supposed “limitations” of shooting traditional video vs. working with a RAW workflow. RAW has plenty of advantages — it gives the most flexibility in post — but video also has its advantages, by allowing for a shorter (and cheaper) post-production pipeline. Always something to keep in mind when planning for any production. Here’s the footage: More »

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Andy Shipsides at Abel Cine has put the Sony F3 through some more dynamic range tests, which confirm earlier tests that the F3 gets about 12 stops of dynamic range (the S-Log firmware update will reportedly add another stop when it is released for $3,300). In addition to demonstrating the number of stops, Abel Cine has gone through the differences in gamma settings and has put together an informative video stepping through the chart: More »

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Director Jason Wingrove has posted a number of beatific shorts filmed at the same Australian sea pool. This isn’t a scientific test by any means, as each short was shot on a different day; but while it may be difficult to compare cameras when what’s in front of the lens is different, it also makes for more interesting viewing since you’re not watching the exact same thing over and over again. Kudos to Jason for some beautiful shots. First up is the RED EPIC shoot, which was done at 120fps: More »

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FS100The ink has barely dried on the Sony NEX-FS100 announcement, and here we are with videos and reviews. Some things have been clarified: the 4:2:2 HDMI output is 8-bit (not 10), and the MSRPs are as follows: NEX-FS100U (without lens) is $5,850, and the NEX-FS100UK (with lens) is $6,550. For street pricing, remove about a grand from each sticker price. Here’s the first footage, which is a music video shot on a pre-production unit: More »

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The unnamed prosumer version of the F3 that Sony has been keeping under wraps is now semi-official. The NEX-FS100 will have the same (roughly Super35-sized) sensor as the F3, offers XLR audio inputs, a detachable viewfinder, a detachable hand grip, up to 1080p/60p shooting, GPS capabilities, and will retail for around $6,000 (including a Sony E-mount zoom lens). More »

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A thread popped up recently on DVXuser that claimed the Panasonic AF100 had a serious design flaw. The sensor would exhibit unacceptable flare when a bright light was pointed into the lens, the post claimed. I can’t like to the thread, as it’s since been deleted — because Panasonic is trying to keep a problem under wraps? Not at all. It was deleted because, in the words of moderator/author Barry Green, it was simply FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt). So what’s the deal with the sensor flare on the AF100 — and on other cameras as well? More »

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Video gurus Art Adams and Adam Wilt have put the Sony F3 through a suite of proper resolution, aliasing, IR sensitivity, and tonal-scale tests, and compared it with the Panasonic AF100 (now in stock at B&H), RED, and ARRI ALEXA cameras. We’ll have to wait for Zacuto to publish their forthcoming single-chip shootout to get a look at proper real-world comparisons (their DSLR vs film shootout was nominated for an Emmy), but here are the result for the time being. The F3 gets 12 + stops of dynamic range — before upgrading to S-Log, which Sony is claiming offers significantly more dynamic range — which, in this price range, is unprecedented. More from their results: More »