» Posts Tagged ‘storyboarding’

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Jorgens ListFor many filmmakers, the storyboarding process is essential for visualizing and organizing their projects before they ever reach for their cameras. But for those of us who couldn’t draw our way out of a paper bag, finding someone who can is often more work than just filling in each panel ourselves. Toronto-based Art Director Jorgen Stovne aims to remedy that with his site Jorgen’s List, a growing directory of storyboard artists, some of which have worked on such projects as the Iron Man, James Bond, Harry Potter and Star Wars series, that filmmakers can browse to find freelancers for their film and animation projects — and it’s all free! More »

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Archer 1 (Color)Chances are if you’re between the ages of 16 to 35, you’ve watched the FX animated hit, ArcherIt’s one of those shows that appeals ever so perfectly to our inner man-child sensibilities. But I digress. It’s a show that combines an extremely basic animation style with a sleek, modern aesthetic, one that combines the mundanities and oddities of a dysfunctional office sitcom with the high-flying action of a well-choreographed spy thriller. In a recent photo set on the Rolling Stone website, Neal Holman, the show’s Art Director, walks us through the process of animating an action scene from Archer: More »

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Amazon StorybuilderOne of the best ways to get your screenplay under control and nicely organized is to outline it, and there are literally endless methods, tools, and materials that can get it done. One that might interest you is the just-launched Amazon Storybuilder (currently still in beta). This cloud-based digital corkboard was developed by Amazon Studios to help users virtually plan out and tack up notecards for their scripts for free. Continue on to find out more. More »

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American BeautyWe’ve talked about previsualization and storyboarding quite a bit recently, noting that although it’s not a mandatory step in making a film, it’s definitely incredibly helpful. We’ve offered the basics of storyboarding, as well as some more advanced concepts to keep in mind while you draft your boards. Now, director Sam Mendes and DP Conrad L. Hall go over the storyboards of their film American Beauty side by side with film stills, offering their ideas behind the film’s composition and what the aesthetics mean. Check out the video after the jump. More »

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Storyboard_cowThough not entirely mandatory, storyboarding is one of those aspects of filmmaking that takes your film from the deep, dank, and dark recesses of your imagination and brings it to life in the here and now. Not long ago, we touched on the basics of storyboarding, and after a little digging, we’ve found some excellent tips from DreamWorks, by way of cartoonist Ben Caldwell, for those of you who are ready to make your previsualizations, and consequently your shots, more dynamic, aesthetic, and masterful. More »

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Storyboard_NCFOMStoryboarding serves many purposes in filmmaking other than being an illustrated representation of a film. They can help you “see” the film before you even turn on the camera, find storytelling issues, sell your idea, and get everybody working on the project on the same page. If you’re interested in knowing more about the world of storyboarding, who better to learn from than J. Todd Anderson, who has been the Coen Brothers’ go-to storyboard artist from Raising Arizona to Inside Llewyn Davis. More »

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BloodsportThe vast majority of my filmmaking education came from just grabbing a camera, shooting stuff, and making (terrible) movies. One film I shake my head particularly hard at is one, actually the only one, that happens to have a fight scene in it, because once I started to edit it together, I realized I didn’t know squat about constructing a fight scene. For those of you who can relate, actor/writer/producer Amar Sidhu shares a few tips for building your action sequences in a Film Courage interview, from how to prepare to what to clothe your actors and stuntmen in to ensure more safety. Check out the video after the break. More »

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amazonstoryteller_logoScreenwriting by its very nature demands a visual writing style. The words on the page have to conjure up images in the reader’s mind if the script were turned into a film. Simultaneously, a screenplay must be economical with its language, using only the words necessary to tell the story. These two requirements, visual and economical, are two of the main reasons why storytelling in the screenplay format can be so difficult. Inevitably, production teams will need to visualize the screenplay, and that’s usually where storyboards come in (though plenty of us are inept at drawing). That’s why Amazon Studios has introduced a new tool to speed up the storyboarding process called Amazon Storyteller – and it’s “free,” but there’s a catch (or four or five). More »

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The spine of any smooth production is its organization, and storyboarding is a key vertebra. Regarding this important phase of pre-visualization, we’ve heard in the past from great filmmakers such as Ridley Scott, Sam Mendes, and Conrad L. Hall. A not-so-recent interview with another visionary, Terry Gilliam, has recently surfaced — and if you’ve seen any of Gilliam’s work, you have a good idea of what fantastical imagery can be accomplished even on a budget (The Brothers Grimm was budgeted at $88 million, true, but Time Bandits was made for $5 million; ‘nough said). I think it would be safe to attribute some of Gilliam’s success in achieving somewhat under-funded flights of fancy to his artistic background, and therefore his ability to storyboard. More »

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Previsualization and storyboarding will vary production to production, but it’s important to have some sort of idea about what you’re shooting before you shoot it. Often there are stories about famous directors coming on set and making it up as they go along, but this isn’t the most ideal way to work, especially when your budget can’t afford 50 crew members to move set pieces and lights to compensate for your on-the-fly planning. Below are two videos, the first is a conversation with Ridley Scott about his own storyboarding work, and the second is a commentary with Sam Mendes and the late Conrad L. Hall comparing storyboards versus screenshots of American Beauty. More »