» Posts Tagged ‘storytelling’

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Gary VaynerchukWhat is at the core of filmmaking? It’s the same thing that made us want to pick up a camera in the first place. Storytelling. But, as things tend to do, the landscape of media consumption has evolved to match our changing needs and desires. Platforms like Twitter, YouTube, and Netflix have sprung up to accommodate this change, but have the ways we tell stories followed suit? Gary Vaynerchuck doesn’t seem to think so. In this 99U talk, the best-selling author and founder of VaynerMedia describes how to be better storytellers in today’s “A.D.D. Culture.” More »

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The EditorWe live in an age where a 6-year-old with a laptop and a copy of iMovie can edit some footage together. Editing software is abundant and as easy to use as it has ever been, and the masses are using these tools to flood the internet with copious amounts of video content. But most of us can agree that simply being able to make edits does not necessarily make a person an editor, at least in the sense of the editing being a creative art form. However, it’s sometimes not clear what exactly an experienced editor can do, and what impact they can have on the final product of a film. Inside the Edit, a brand new online editing course, has put together a short video that demystifies the complexity of an editor’s job. More »

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Periodic TableAttention everyone: We have found it. We have found the Holy Grail of online screenwriting/storytelling resources. If you’re a screenwriter and/or a complete glutton for geeking out, you need to stop what you’re doing immediately and check out Design Through Storytelling’s Periodic Table of Storytelling, which — is exactly what it sounds like — a collection of story tropes organized by purpose and name, all of which are clickable links that take you to their own TV Tropes wiki page. More »

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Akira Kurosawa(Answer: Everything!) Akira Kurosawa is in a league of his own. To master filmmakers, like Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and Oliver Stone, he was the teacher, and often shared his knowledge with those who asked. Flavorwire has published a few pieces of said knowledge in the form of Kurosawa’s greatest filmmaking quotes — ones that beautifully answer questions about the craft, advise us on storytelling, and remind us why we fell in love with cinema in the first place. More »

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Jordan and HollynTechnology is an important part of filmmaking, as well as something we like to talk about here at No Film School, but when it comes down to it, one, if not the, most integral part of our craft is storytelling. Editors and instructors Larry Jordan and Norman Hollyn forgo the “tech talk”, as they say, to delve into a conversation about the great influence film/video editing has in terms of telling stories, including ways certain edits can “guide” the viewer’s eye, attention, and emotional response to a scene. More »

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Pixar ebookWhen Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats tweeted out 22 storytelling tips, something interesting happened. It was as if the curtain was lifted to reveal the heart of a mysterious, magical, and inspiring player in filmmaking, and many screenwriters (I was one of them), treated this small collection of advice as a lost book of the storytelling bible. Stephan Vladimir Bugaj, who has spent 12 years writing and developing stories at Pixar, has now shared his eBook in which he expounds on each tip. Continue on for the link to the free download. More »

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The Future of StorytellingHere at nofilmschool, we focus a lot of our time and efforts on writing about the many technical aspects of filmmaking. Admittedly, we love writing about new cameras, cool pieces of software, and almost all other products that serve to make the filmmaking process easier and more fun. However, narrative filmmaking, despite all of its technical processes, is inherently a medium for telling stories. Plainly and simply, filmmaking is storytelling. And ultimately, it’s storytelling, and not technical mastery, that indicates whether a film is good or not. Luckily, for those of us who aren’t storytelling inclined, iversity, a leading provider of free online courses, has introduced a brand new course called “The Future of Storytelling.” Check out the details below. More »

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writers-blockOf all the parts of a movie, from cinematography, to editing, and everything in between, writing is perhaps the most (what with all the books, classes, weekend seminars), and least (at the end of the day it’s just you and the page), understood. The art of crafting stories and creating indelible characters that will make an unforgettable film is a real gift, though it can and must be developed through careful, patient work. The Guardian has a great piece about a new book that explores creativity, and they’ve come up with six habits of highly successful writers. Check out the tips below as well as more advice from the masters. More »

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Evolution of Cinema_Tom PerlmutterIn a quick, yet thought-provoking video for the Future of Storytelling Summit, Government Film Commissioner and Chairperson of the National Film Board of Canada Tom Perlmutter shares his thoughts on the future of storytelling. He explains the basic human need behind the act of telling a story, how that act has evolved over time, and where its evolution is heading: transmedia. To find out more on what Perlmutter says about interactive filmmaking, check out the video after the jump. More »

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IThe-War-of-Art_Pressfield (1)f you’re like most screenwriters I know (myself included), you have a shelf full of books on the art and craft of writing. These books do everything from leading us on the hero’s journey, to breaking down the two, three, five or more act structure of a well-designed screenplay, and engendering sympathy with your protagonist early on. But I’ve found one book that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and it doesn’t have a thing to do with crafting story-arcs or “sympathetic” characters. It has to do with Resistance, every artist’s greatest enemy. Click below to find out more about the book that might change the way you look at your craft. More »

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Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 12.40.07 PMOn Story from PBS in Austin is a “new series which takes a look at the creative process of filmmaking through the eyes of some of the entertainment industry’s most prolific writers, directors, and producers.” Recently they had a great panel discussion with Danny Boyle, Jason Reitman, and Ed Burns at the Austin Film Festival where they discussed the challenges of finding the right story and writing to suit your budget. It’s a must-see for indie filmmakers and screenwriters. Check it out below! More »

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polaroidChristopher Nolan’s Memento was a sleeper smash-hit in 2000: the smart indie used an ingenious backwards narrative structure and well-drawn but mysterious characters to draw us into the world of Leonard Shelby, the ‘ten minute man’ who suffers from anterograde amnesia, unable to make new memories. Now the film has been re-edited to run chronologically, and is available to watch online. Click below to see what an indie filmmaker can learn from the narrative structure of this indie classic!  More »

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Nowadays, major franchises get the royal treatment upon release. Some video game series are expanded with original novels or comic books between release dates. The opening of many big films occurs with novelizations and video games accompanying them. The problem is, I haven’t seen many video game adaptations I’ve been able to appreciate as good films in their own right, and all the while games seem to be getting more and more realistic. How comparable, or even compatible is storytelling between video games and movies? If anybody could figure it out, it’d be “Star Wars Episode VII director” J.J. Abrams and Valve co-founder/CEO Gabe Newell. Check out their full D.I.C.E. 2013 keynote discussion below. More »

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With this week’s limited release of Mike Birbiglia’s Sleepwalk With Me (which has apparently ruffled some feathers), a hybrid of personal memoir, storytelling and narrative film, I’m reminded of the power of a good story well told, regardless of form. As aspiring screenwriters, we should be looking beyond the boundaries of the silver screen (or computer screen, or TV screen, or mobile device) to hear how great stories captivate an audience and take them on an emotional journey. With that in mind, here are three storytelling podcasts that screenwriters should check out. More »

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Pixar’s relentless success at the box office with truly original tales has convinced screenwriters the world over that the animation studio holds the secret to amazing storytelling. In all honesty, hyperbole aside, Pixar does hold the secret to amazing storytelling, but they are more than willing to share it with the rest of us. Pixar’s Brave writer/director Mark Andrews took a moment to describe the studio’s story process in a phone interview podcast with ScreenwritingU’s Jenna Milly. More »

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Director and Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats (@lawnrocket) recently tweeted out 22 tips for storytelling, one of which ends with “Endings are hard, get yours working up front.” From day one I always knew how I wanted Manchild to end — and throughout a year and a half of writing, the ending has never changed. Perhaps that’s why, while it is not the first feature I’ve written, it will be the first feature I actually make (more news on the project when I have some… soon). Here are the tips, handily compiled in list form: More »

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I just finished reading The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories by Wired writer Frank Rose. The book provides an overview of all the changes taking place in our connected, interactive, game-ified culture, more than justifying its lengthy title in the process. As someone who’s interested in interactive storytelling in addition to more linear film narratives, I found the book to be packed with flavor crystals of brain candy (how’s that for an endorsement?). Here’s the first chapter, free: More »