» Posts Tagged ‘style’

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high-and-lowWhile trying to think of something germane, pertinent and well, interesting, to say about the video essay which supplies the ostensible topic for this post, I happened upon a fact, which appears at the end of what I am about to start talking about,  but which I am going to lead with, and bear with me, okay? So this is a video documentary (essay, really) which teases out the connections between Alfred Hitchcock’s work and Akira Kurosawa’s 1963 crime flick, High and Low. The connection I chose to start from (in a roundabout way) is as good a point as any, I think, for a discussion of Hitchcock’s possible influence on Kurosawa (and everyone) without sounding too, too pretentious and/or lame. Hopefully. You’ll be the judge! More »

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FilmmakersAs filmmakers, we do quite a bit of research and study. We read a vast number of tutorials, and articles texts; we watch classic films and go to countless first showings. We do so much to fill our brains with all of the information we think will prepare us for making films and seeing our craft from a new perspective. However, sometimes all we need is a simple quote. Tumblr blog A-BitterSweet-Life (which you should religiously follow) has shared a spiffy interactive Prezi presentation that highlights some truly inspiring quotes about filmmaking and style from 12 filmmakers from all different countries and all different eras including Andrei Tarkovsky, Maya Deren, and Steven Soderbergh. More »

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TheMaster_PaulThomasAndersonP.T. Anderson is a director who has worked within the Hollywood system for almost his whole career and yet managed to maintain an independent spirit exemplary of the sort of personal work typified by the best of indie cinema. He is also a director whose style has undergone a dramatic evolution since the relatively recent start of his career. We investigate some of the homages Anderson has paid to some of the greatest directors in cinematic history, like Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and Mikhail Kalatozov, as well as his ever-evolving, maturing style. More »

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Claude ChabrolEven though many great filmmakers are associated with the French New Wave, three of them stand out as the unofficial representatives of the movement: Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and Claude Chabrol. However, Chabrol rides high atop the wave crest by making, arguably, the first film of Nouvelle Vague, Le Beau SergeLike his fellow auteurs of the plastic arts, Chabrol wrote many an article on his theories of film, one of which film scholar Adrian Martin cites in an audio commentary about the filmmaker. Martin describes Chabrol’s sensibilities regarding “theme” — essentially arguing that what matters isn’t found in the script, but in the mind of the filmmaker. More »