» Posts Tagged ‘theaters’

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Paul GreengrassAt first glance, this BAFTA lecture from Captain Phillips director, Paul Greengrass on iconic director David Lean, might seem like a simple nod to an individual career — a legendary one, but individual nonetheless. However, as Greengrass’ speech goes on, it becomes a more of a soliloquy about the life of a director —  the choices that ones has to make in order to be and continue to be one. It’s really a beautiful and powerful lecture with plenty of helpful information about the craft of filmmaking (and David Lean, too!), so continue on to check it out. More »

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Movie TrailerThey are the reason why we show up on time to the movie theater — “Hurry up! We’re gonna miss the previews!” Previews, movie trailers, or coming attractions are a staple of the cinematic experience and are more often than not enjoyed as pieces of art (or 1 1/2 minute short) rather than seen as advertisements (though they are both). In this comprehensive video, John P. Hess of Filmmaker IQ takes us on a journey through the history of the movie trailer, offering an interesting perspective by explaining not only how they’ve changed over time, but why they’ve changed. More »

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Martin ScorseseIt has been over six months since Steven Spielberg and George Lucas talked about the impending doom of the current studio system. Now, another Hollywood heavyweight, director Martin Scorsese offers his opinion on cinema’s current and future state in an open letter to his daughter, originally published in the Italian magazine l’Espresso. Scorsese’s take on the future of filmmaking is that, yes, it’s surely changing, but it’s still bright and promising thanks to something that has become more the rule than the exception: low-budget filmmaking. More »

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project drive in honda movie theater digital projection film cinemaWhen was the last time you saw a movie at a drive-in theater? What would you do if you knew you could help save the few remaining drive-ins from “going dark” forever? Interestingly enough, American Honda (yes, that Honda) is giving you that exact opportunity. According to its Project Drive-In campaign, there are merely 368 drive-ins still open for theatrical screening in the US. As many drive-ins face the financial leap of upgrading to digital projection — or the looming alternative, shutting down permanently — Project Drive-In has helped save 9 theaters, donating digital projection systems to 5 of them outright. There’s still many theaters, however, that could use some serious help. Read more for details on Honda’s ongoing Project Drive-In & Indiegogo campaign. More »

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Home-TheaterThe term “home theater” has become a little bit archaic now with the advent of VOD platforms that allow you to watch films on computers and mobile devices, but still, the ability to watch films at home was a development that changed the world of cinema forever. In yet another excellent lesson, Filmmaker IQ brings us an exhaustive look inside the history of life before the home theater, the technology that made it possible, as well as the effects it has on our culture today. More »

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Pacific RimRemember when we talked about the impending Cinemapocalypse and how George Lucas said that one day you’ll be charged $50 to go to the movies? Did that sound sad, but true, but also some time in the distant future? Well, that time is now– kind of. Canadian theater chain, Cineplex, announced a while back that it will be offering a “SuperTicket“, a 2-in-1 theater ticket/digital copy combo, and Guillermo del Toro’s sci-fi action flick Pacific Rim is the first film on which they’re testing it out. More »

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Spielberg and LucasBy now, most of you have heard about Steven Spielberg and George Lucas predicting the “implosion” of the major studios and theatrical releases of films. With the growing popularity of VOD and self-distribution, the two veteran filmmakers explained that the old model is slowly but surely falling apart at the same time that a new one is being built in its place. The question is — will independent film become a casualty to the change, or will it naturally fit into the framework of the new paradigm? More »

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Often when I’ve talked about small theaters going away or losing relevance thanks to the digital transition, many seem incredulous. Part of the reason they’re closing left and right is related to the expensive digital transition, which involves far more than buying an HD projector at a local Best Buy. Many of these theaters, though, offer something no multiplex can: films that are way outside the mainstream and American or foreign classics, many of which are only available in 35mm prints. The Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is one of these independent theaters, and they’re heading to Kickstarter to raise money for some necessary upgrades. Check out the video below: More »

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If you’ve had the chance to go to an independent movie theater, you know it’s a completely different experience than going to one of the chain theaters. Many of these theaters only have a few screens, and they tend to specialize in older films or those on the fringes of the filmmaking world. The theaters may not always be in perfect shape, but most of them care about the movies first — and it shows. With everything going digital, these smaller theaters are starting to disappear unless they make serious monetary investments, and that’s exactly the situation that Cinefamily in Los Angeles is going through right now. Click through to check out their Kickstarter launch video: More »

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RED seems to be on a roll lately. First it’s massive price drops, which include a $4,000 RED ONE MX body — you know — a camera that has shot many high-end feature films, and it costs only a little more than DSLR after the price drop. Now it’s looking like their REDRAY player, which plays highly compressed 4K material at lower-than-Blu Ray bitrates (but with almost indistinguishable quality), will begin shipping soon. The biggest news, however, is that RED is partnering with another company to introduce a 4K content distribution network built right into REDRAY. Slowly but surely 4K is arriving, and the only thing left is displays and affordable projectors – and RED is working on the latter. Click through for more details on both pre-announcements. More »

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I’m visiting friends in Denver, CO this week and the movie we all want to see is Moneyball. So my friends bring up Fandango to find out where it’s playing locally. However, what they don’t know is that Fandango, like its competitor MovieTickets.com, doesn’t simply show you the nearest theaters as you would expect. Instead, both sites prioritize their own partner theaters and, to varying degrees, hide theaters from which they don’t collect commission on ticket sales (often relegating theaters to the next page even though they’re closer geographically). Enter Filmbot, a new independent showtime engine that promises to treat all theaters equally, including independent listings and special screenings, and that also aims to make your theatrical experience personalized and social using Facebook. It’s limited to New York city right now, but it should be expanding to other areas soon. Here’s the demo video: More »

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I’ll have more to come on RED’s NAB announcements (or strange lack thereof) in the coming days, but after a few visits to their booth, I thought the product that was being underreported was the RED RAY 4K playback system(s). The RED RAY Pro — announced long ago — was running flawlessly in a corner, and the RED RAY consumer version was on display as a mock-up. After spending some time with RED engineer Stuart English, the devices looked a lot more disruptive — especially for independent theatrical distribution. More »

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Lost in the debate over the future of 3D is the question of how independent art-house films could take advantage of the added dimension — in ways that have nothing to do with the shock value of horror films or the spectacle of action movies. In an article at Salon, @mattzollerseitz asks the question of what could happen if filmmakers begin to use the use 3D technology to make films that are more abstract or more intimate than their 2D counterparts. More »