» Posts Tagged ‘tutorial’

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After Effects Key CleanerOver the past two weeks, we’ve been sharing tutorials for the new features that were introduced in the recent major update to Adobe’s Creative Cloud video applications. First we took a look at Live Text Templates, which allow for complex text compositions from After Effects to be manipulated inside of Premiere. Then we took a look at the new features in SpeedGrade 2014, including stronger linking with Premiere and a host of new usability features. After Effects also received several new features in this most recent update, including two new effects which should make the keying process much faster and more accurate. More »

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SpeedGrade CCLast week, Adobe released the much-anticipated update to their Creative Cloud video applications. We’ve already taken a look at one of the most exciting new features inside of Premiere/After Effects, Live Text Templates, which allows multi-faceted After Effects text compositions to be manipulated directly inside of Premiere, eliminating the need for excessive round-tripping. However, Live Text Templates are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to new features in this update. SpeedGrade CC, Adobe’s color grading application, also received a few welcome new features, features that one of our readers, Dave Andrade, shows off in a new video. More »

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Soul Searcher LightingIf there’s anything that up-and-coming filmmakers struggle with more than anything else, it’s lighting. Even though most of us can pull off a basic three-point lighting setup with a key, fill, and backlight, dramatic narrative lighting is often far more complex and multi-faceted than any simple setup can provide. Unfortunately, we all don’t have the budget for highly complex lighting setups with a multitude of lights and modifiers. Most of us are stuck with a few lights (at best) and a few small or DIY modifiers. Luckily, this is 2014, and literally anything can be learned on YouTube, even dramatic lighting for narrative films with a minimal budget. Neil Oseman, who shot a fantasy/action feature in 2005 called Soul Searcher, recently uploaded a 10-minute masterclass on how he lit the film, and it is delectably educational. More »

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Double ReflectorAs indie filmmakers, we’re used to working in tight spaces — bathrooms, cars, your own studio apartment, so we know that, sometimes, the locations we need for our scenes just aren’t conducive for simple lighting setups. Luckily, The Slanted Lens recently pulled off a little bit of cinematography acrobatics for a shoot they did inside a cave at the L.A. Zoo, and they’ve shared a tutorial to teach us how to use two reflectors to double-bounce natural light around a corner. More »

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Premiere Pro Live Text TemplatesA few days ago, Adobe released the Creative Cloud 2014 video applications, an update that included a few extremely welcomed new features throughout the entire range of video tools. Most notably, Premiere Pro and After Effects are becoming even more tightly integrated than they were previously, with new features in Premiere like masking and tracking of effects and Live Text Templates. These templates allow editors to manipulate text assets in multi-layer After Effects compositions without ever leaving Premiere Pro, something which should end the practice of incessant round-tripping between the two programs in order to make small adjustments. In a brand new Lynda tutorial, Chris Meyer shows us how exactly Live Text Templates work, and how to incorporate this exciting new feature into your editing workflow. More »

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HistogramCameras these days come with a veritable plethora of tools to help you expose your images properly, everything from built-in exposure meters to zebras and false color displays. However, there’s one tool that is often overlooked, despite the fact that it’s available on nearly every digital camera today. The histogram. It’s an extremely simple tool, but when used properly, it can help you make sure that you never blow out your highlights again. More »

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teleportationThere are several techniques that you can use to pull off a good teleportation effect. Most understand the basics — how to splice two (or three) different shots together, having your actors freeze while your teleporter gets into position. However, there are a few polishing moves that you might not know about that could really up your SFX game, as well as sell your effect. The always entertaining and enlightening crew at Film Riot has a brand new tutorial that shares a few of these tricks, including how to position your teleporter, what kinds of visual and sound effects you can use, and how to put it all together in After Effects. More »

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Adobe AuditionFew things in filmmaking are as difficult or headache-inducing as getting clean production audio while you’re on set. Hence the reason that ADR is such a widespread practice throughout the narrative filmmaking industry. In almost all cases, even with the most talented boom operators and on-set mixers, there will be imperfections in the production sound. However, before scrapping the original sound for ADR (which is an incredibly time-consuming process), there are some nifty post production tricks in Adobe’s lineup of programs that could save you hours upon hours of time with just a few clicks. More »

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Lightworks For MacFor the past few years, we’ve been patiently awaiting the long-rumored arrival of the Mac version of the legendary NLE Lightworks. A functioning version of the Mac software was shown as far back as NAB 2013, and at that time, many of us started to get excited. Nearly a year later, EditShare, the company which now owns Lightworks, announced that the public beta of the Mac version would become available in the middle of June. Well folks, the day has finally come where Mac users can head on over to the Lightworks website and download the software for themselves. Rejoice! More »

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DIY TimelapseGetting a high quality time-lapse doesn’t have to be insanely expensive, especially if you’re only moving your camera a short distance; set up your tripod in a desired location, slap on a slider and a motion control device and you’re golden. But, covering longer distances in an area that is inhospitable to tripods can be a little more tricky — and expensive. The folks at Syrp, however, want to show you how to build your own wooden DIY 2-axis Cable Cam rig that will let you pull off stellar time-lapse shots at a fraction of the cost. More »

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C-Stand SandbagThe lighting and grip department is full of unspoken rules that are geared towards keeping the cast and crew as safe as possible. However, there’s one rule that might just be the most important of them all. That rule can be summed up as: “ALWAYS USE SANDBAGS WHEN USING A LIGHT STAND, C-STAND, OR COMBO STAND FOR ANYTHING.” I’m sorry I yelled, but this simple concept can prevent some seriously calamitous things from happening on a set, chiefly hot lights or heavy modifiers falling on people’s heads. With that in mind, let’s take a look at an incredibly ironic video and talk a little bit about proper techniques for setting up C-Stands! More »

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Premiere Pro Title TutorialAdding titles may not be the most exciting of your post-production process, but that’s not to say that you shouldn’t spend some time taking your titles to the next level. Anyone who’s ever wandered over to the fantastic blog Art of the Title knows that titling can not only play an integral role in defining the aesthetic and themes of your film, but that the titles themselves can be a standalone piece of art. Of course, some of the astounding title sequences on that blog take months, even years, to create. However, with a few clicks and two minutes of time, you can take your titles from bland to visually stimulating. Here’s a quick tutorial from GeniusDV which shows you how to put video inside of your titles in Premiere Pro CC. More »

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DIY ring lightIf you’re like me and don’t know what to do with all of those empty fried chicken buckets piling up on your kitchen counter (okay, not really — I know exactly what to do with them), DIY Photography has shared a great DIY (naturally) lighting solution that repurposes said greasy poultry receptacles into a formidable ring flash. And even though it’s designed to be used for flash photography, it should translate well to video. So, find out how to put it together using a cardboard bucket, aluminum foil, a plastic folder, and some tape right after the jump. More »

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field-of-viewWhen you first start shooting photos and videos, understanding the basic differences between lenses is pretty simple — the way your images change between a wide angle and telephoto lens, for example, is overt. However, learning how to use perspective and field of view to your image’s advantage can really help you capture the look you’re going for, and Steve Perry shows you how to do that (using landscapes as an example) in this tutorial. Find out how to utilize the concept of perspective in order to become more intentional as you capture your shots. More »

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DIY Ring LightOne of the biggest components that contributes to making a film look cinematic isn’t just a great camera and lenses — it’s lighting. Many times, however, lighting kits are the pieces of gear that are rented thanks in part to their large, awkward storage requirements, as well as their high price tag. But, having lights available whenever you need them can save money and headaches in the long run, and what better way to stockpile lights than through dirt cheap, DIY builds! Continue on for a handy tutorial on how to build a $30 ring light. More »

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Creating a StormSometimes, for a film, you gotta make it rain — unless of course you live in the Pacific Northwest, or somewhere equally as soggy and miserable. And even if you do live in 75%-chance-of-rain perpetuity, natural rain looks nothing like movie rain on-screen. Creating stormy conditions is something that is extremely intentional and labor intensive, but Jason Satterlund, a Portland-based filmmaker and probable rain expert, shares several tips on how to create “sexy movie rain” and dynamic wind effects on a budget. Continue on for the videos. More »

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MonopodWhat’s the difference between a normal monopod and a video monopod? Well, the most glaring difference would be the tripod foot, a nifty little add-on that not only keeps your video monopod steady, but also almost single-handedly jacks up the price to outrageous amounts. There is a DIY work-around, however, and the folks over at CheesyCam have shared a tutorial, as well as some helpful links, to show you how to take an inexpensive monopod, add a $20 fluid base tripod foot (as well as some adhesive), and make a fully functional video monopod. More »

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Green Screen Premiere ProWe all know how important lighting is in the process of shooting a subject against a green screen. However, having the ability to pull a solid key from any footage (whether it’s well lit or not) is perhaps one of the most important skills for somebody to have in the world of post-production. This is especially important considering that many low-budget editors are now becoming the one man bands of the post-production process. Luckily, programs like Premiere Pro include a plethora of effects that can be used to pull a fantastic key every single time, and without the need to leave your NLE. More »

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Ari and EmmaLighting your scenes can seem like a daunting task, especially if you’re just starting out, and many times, despite your best laid plans, setting up your lights turns into a learn-as-you-go experience. That’s why it’s supremely helpful to see how other filmmakers created the looks in their own films. DP Nathan Blair shares the versatile lighting setup he used on a comedic short, in which he captures 9 different visual styles with just one shot composition. More »

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DaVinci ResolveIn the process of narrative filmmaking, a talented cinematographer can achieve the desired aesthetic through closely controlling the characteristics of light, color, and composition. In these cases, color correction shouldn’t really be needed (although a creative grade can certainly take the image to another level). In documentary filmmaking, however, where many of the images are captured sporadically as the action unfolds (which can very easily lead to mismatched footage), the process of creating a unified aesthetic is usually left to the colorist. Luckily, John Ryan Seaman of GranolaTech has some excellent tips for grading your documentary-style footage that should help get you up to speed on the core concepts and techniques for color correction. More »