» Posts Tagged ‘vashinedomansky’

Description image

mixingboardThe art of manipulating sound is an occult practice, mysterious and daunting to outsiders, though in reality, like almost everything, a little education goes a long way and the information is out there if you look for it; since many filmmakers, though, are taught from the beginning (at least I was), to shoot MOS and concentrate solely on the visual, with sound a distant second, it can be a blind spot in their skill set, but a vital skill. And with the concomitant proliferation of audio technology (specifically DAWs, or Digital Audio Workstations), there’s no excuse for an indie filmmaker not to educate themselves in the art of noise. Click through for five tips on EQing sound, for filmmakers! More »

Description image

Breaking BadThese days, a low-budget, indie filmmaker can fly their camera in through a window, glide it around the floor and send it for a bath, all without  prohibitive expense. But, as we all know, camera moves are most effective when they work in concert with the story — and sometimes, the simplest moves are the best for the scene. An example of this comes courtesy of Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals from the series finale of everyone’s favorite crystal meth soap opera, Breaking Bad: a deceptively simple camera move that brought new dimension and depth to a pivotal scene. More »

Description image

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.21.44 PMThe dolly zoom, also referred to as the Vertigo effect or a Zolly shot, is a technique wherein the camera is dollied either forward or backward while the zoom on the lens is pulled in the opposite direction. When timed correctly, the effect of this technique is one in which the characters in the frame remain the same size while the foreground and background become compressed or de-compressed, depending on which direction the camera is traveling. It’s a technique that has been part of the cinematic language for almost 60 years, and as such, it has evolved over time. Our friend Vashi Nedomansky over at Vashi Visuals has put together a comprehensive look at the evolution of the dolly zoom, and it’s a fantastic watch, to say the least. More »

Description image

La JeteeFamed director David Lean once said that one should be able to cut any frame out of a roll of film and be able to frame it and hang it on the wall. There is great power in the still image. Seeing as most filmmakers will at one point use stills in their work (especially documentarians), it’d be a good idea to get a solid understanding of what a single frame can do. A video by Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals proves to be helpful by not only identifying several films that harness the power of still images (even carrying the weight of a full film), but by also offering a few tips on using them from an editor’s perspective . More »

Description image

anamorphicThe anamorphic look is highly desired by many filmmakers for many reasons, including unique lens flares and bokehs. We posted an article a week ago on shooting anamorphic, and one thing some of you might’ve noticed is that anamorphic adapters and lenses can be expensive. So, if you find yourself in a bind financially, but are still wanting your images to resemble the aesthetic that anamorphic provides, Vashi Nedomansky of VashiVisuals is offering his After Effects plugin, VashiMorphic40, for the low, low price of free. Continue on for more details. More »

Description image

Split DiopterIf you’ve ever been watching a film, say Carrie or Reservoir Dogsand you’ve seen a shot that had incredibly deep focus, then maybe you were looking at a shot that used a split focus (or split field) diopter. These lens attachments produce a signature look that puts objects near and far into focus, a look that made Gregg Toland a legend, and later swept over the filmmaking world in the 70s. Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals takes a look at the use of split focus diopters throughout cinema, and picks out all 15 shots from Brian De Palma’s 1981 film Blow Out that use one. More »

Description image

Vashi low budget editingIf you’re a no or low-budget filmmaker, making an action flick oftentimes means having to forego top dollar visual and special effects for more affordable options. If your lack of high-octane explosions and car chases finds you feeling like your film is falling flat, talented filmmaker and editor Vashi Nedomansky has shared three no/low-budget editing tips that will give your action sequences and dramatic moments the (believable) big impact you’re looking for. More »

Description image

Vashi Forced Perspective HumveeOne big headache of making films on a tight budget is having to sacrifice parts of your story in order to keep the project from costing an arm and a leg. Sometimes that’s just the nature of the beast and completely unavoidable, but other times, with a little help from some clever visual effects techniques, we can save money and keep what we want in our films. Vashi Nedomansky of Vashi Visuals reminds us that, at its core, cinema is a medium of illusion. By setting a miniature Humvee in the sand dunes of California, he was able to use forced perspective to shoot a flashback scene with a realistic-looking vehicle set in the Iraqi desert. Continue reading to find out how he did it. More »

Description image

Light BulbHow many times have you come across an article with a title like “50 Million Ways to Get Rid of Writer’s Block” and “Unlikely Foods that Will Jumpstart Your Writing”. Being a writer myself, I enjoy the plethora of creativity advice, tips, and tricks, but I’m often at a loss as an editor. The repetition of commercial jobs or the tediousness of a project you’ve worked on for months can turn your once purified spring of creativity into a sludge-filled stagnant pond. Well, Vashi Nedomansky of VashiVisuals has got you covered. Check out this editor’s approach to dealing with creative stagnation after the jump. More »