» Posts Tagged ‘wesanderson’

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Criterion CollectionThe Criterion Collection offers a lot more than access to some of the best and most historically significant films from around the world (and great supplemental features, too). The site also provides studious cinephiles with its own extras, like engaging articles about these classics and their world-class filmmakers, as well as their Top 10 lists, which share the favorite Criterion films of some of the biggest creatives, who explain why they’re important to them personally and professionally. Continue on to see which classics filmmakers like Jane Campion, Christopher Nolan, Martin Scorsese, and Roger Corman put in their top 10. More »

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Wes Anderson Doc headerWhen watching a film that’s well-made, it’s easy to forget that it’s built from the ground up. This is especially fascinating when considering the quirky universe of Wes Anderson, who designs, builds, and captures every one of his films to meet the standards of a precocious perfectionist. Thanks to this Vimeo Staff Pick mini-documentary by Paul Waters, we get to peek inside the sometimes subtle, sometimes overt methods Anderson uses to craft his characters, sets, and shots. More »

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Moonrise KingdomThere are very few filmmakers working today whose films are so heavily marked by their DNA, so much so that they’re recognizable to cinephiles and casual moviegoers alike. One of these filmmakers is Wes Anderson. Most people know a Wes Anderson movie when they see it; the distinguishing color palette, signature camera moves, the many, many overhead shots, but there is much, much more to be said about his visual themes. Nelson Carvajal peeks inside the director’s imaginative world in this excellent video that showcases some of Anderson’s best films, as well as voiceovers from interviews with the director in which he talks about his artistic sensibilities. More »

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Castello CavalcantiWes Anderson is at it again with his second branded film, Castello Cavalcanti, marketing the “Candy L’Eau” fragrance from Italian luxury fashion house Prada. Castello, like his and Roman Coppola’s first installment for Prada, is set in Europe, only instead of France, takes place in a small Italian town circa 1955. The director’s signature style is seen throughout the 8-minute short, however his specific nods to historical Italian cinema, namely the work of Fellini, offer an added bonus to Anderson’s fans. Continue on to check out the short. More »

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MidnightCoiterieI’m pretty sure that just as this amusing little trailer satirizing the iconic style of director Wes Anderson was made available to the public, filmmakers were asking, “How did they do that?” Many have tried to replicate Anderson’s aesthetic — and many have failed. So, what did the filmmakers of the SNL spoof trailer, The Midnight Coterie of Sinister Intrudersdo in order to capture Anderson’s signature cinematic sensibilities? Alex Buono, SNL’s DP, explains just how they did it. More »

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Wes Anderson SpoofWes Anderson, with all of his quirky, very overt style of set design and filmmaking techniques, is a prime target for parody. Now that the trailer to his latest film The Grand Budapest Hotel has been circulating throughout the interwebs, and with the rise in successful indie horror films, and since Halloween is right around the corner, Saturday Night Live took on satirizing his signature style with a bit of a sinister twist in a sketch from last night’s show. Check out SNL’s “The Midnight Coterie of Sinister Intruders” after the jump: More »

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Frequent collaborators Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola get together once again to bring us a short film for Prada’s new fragrance Prada Candy. The film has its auteurs’ thematic, cinematic, and aesthetic fingerprints all over it, which makes you forget that you’re in fact watching a commercial. Set in France, the film follows two young and attractive men as they vie for the affections of the beautiful “Candy.” Watch the short and go behind the scenes after the jump: More »

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In the spirit of consideration for the highest honors a work may receive in our field, we have been keeping you up to date with a number of scripts seeking nomination — one of the earliest of these was Moonrise Kingdom, which has in fact been nominated for Best Original Screenplay. Interestingly enough, and in contrast to the rest of the scripts you may have caught so far, the script for Moonrise Kingdom is now also available in a new, very unique textual-visual version, complete with an interactive navigator. Read on for the details of this ‘Screenplay 2.0′ below. More »

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It’s no secret that many directors have “signature shots,” or shots that they tend to use (or even overuse) in their films. Vimeo user kogonada has edited together three brilliant mashups of some of the signature shots of Stanley Kubrick, Quentin Tarantino, and Wes Anderson. As a community of filmmakers, I think we can all agree there is something to be learned from how the greats make use of these shots. Hit the jump for the first video, which shows Kubrick’s use of the One-Point Perspective: More »

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Some screenwriting resources stress that a theme must be clearly stated or emphasized in a screenplay, preferably near the beginning, sometimes even on a specific page. This has never made any sense to me. While I won’t argue that a theme can’t or shouldn’t be explicitly stated in a screenplay or film, a good story well told reveals its theme over the course of the entire story arc, in my opinion. In fact, writer/director Wes Anderson claims he never consciously writes his screenplays around any particular theme in a recent episode of Elvis Mitchell’s The Treatment. More »