» Posts Tagged ‘wga’

Description image

Robert TowneThe two screenplays that I had to constantly study while in college were Casablanca and Chinatown, the latter of which was written by masterful screenwriter Robert Towne, who also penned Mission Impossible I II, as well as Without Limits (which was filmed in my hometown of Eugene — no big deal.) The Writer’s Guild Association sat down with Towne for an almost hour-long interview, in which he talks at length about his childhood, how he fell in love with the cinema, and how Roger Corman helped him get his big break. Hit the jump to watch the interview: More »

Description image

Writers Guild WestFilm is dead (good thing we shoot digitally now). Theatrical distribution is a pipe dream (good thing we have new distribution outlets). And less and less screenwriters get paid to write movies for the big screen (good thing we have television). As aspiring screenwriters looking at the evolving landscape of storytelling on the screen, we should ask ourselves, “What exactly are we aspiring to do?” Maybe the answer should be: Write for television. Based on the earnings numbers for writers in the WGAW 2012 annual report, that looks like the answer for many professional screenwriters already. More »

Description image

Black List partners with Warner Bros new writer dealsHere at NFS, we’ve written extensively about The Black List and its paid service for screenwriters to have their screenplays evaluated and hosted for industry executives to download and read. The Black List honestly seems to be trying to break down barriers between aspiring screenwriters and production executives, albeit for a fee. Writers will have to be judges of the value of the service for themselves, but The Black List has just announced another deal that might boost its value proposition. The Black List has partnered with Warner Bros. to give new, diverse screenwriters the chance to get two-step WGA minimum blind deals from the major studio on an ongoing basis. For more details about this announcement, hit the jump. More »

Description image

Writers Guild WestHere at nofilmschool, we’ve written several posts covering the evolution of The Black List and its paid screenplay hosting service. Just last month, we analyzed the Black List success story of Richard Cordiner getting noticed on the service and signing a deal with Warner Bros. Now, The Black List has announced a major partnership with The Writers Guild of America, West, providing free and discounted services on The Black List to WGAW members. Originally, The Black List paid service seemed like a gateway for undiscovered writers to access industry executives, so this new announcement begs the question: Who really benefits from The Black List’s services? The Black List founder Franklin Leonard offers some insight as he explained this new partnership with WGAW. More »

Description image

sopranosJust as they did in 2006 with their list of the 101 Best Written Screenplays, the Writer’s Guild of America has released their list of the 101 best-written TV series. While many screenwriters aspire to see their vision on the big screen, with cable becoming ever more cinematic every year, the hard and fast division between the two mediums, at least in terms of quality, is fast falling by the wayside. Click below for the top ten on the WGA’s list! More »

Description image

The annual Writers Guild Awards are upon us once again, and the Los Angeles show is streaming live tonight at 9PM Eastern and 6PM Pacific (a simultaneous show is also happening at WGA East). A number of the movie screenplays that are nominated for awards have been made available by the studios, so if you want to read some, be sure to check them out while they’re still online. Click through to watch the show. More »

Description image

As many of us here consider ourselves DIY filmmakers, the thought of packaging our scripts with talent may not cross our minds frequently. Yet, even for the most independent project, we need an audience. As writers, we need to write for our audience. By this, I don’t mean we should pander to the audience or write what the audience expects. Rather, as we craft our stories on the page, we need to keep our readers engaged. Those readers include producers, casting agents, and talent, as a recent WGAw educational panel reiterated for aspiring writers. More »