» Posts Tagged ‘wgaw’

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Writers Guild WestFilm is dead (good thing we shoot digitally now). Theatrical distribution is a pipe dream (good thing we have new distribution outlets). And less and less screenwriters get paid to write movies for the big screen (good thing we have television). As aspiring screenwriters looking at the evolving landscape of storytelling on the screen, we should ask ourselves, “What exactly are we aspiring to do?” Maybe the answer should be: Write for television. Based on the earnings numbers for writers in the WGAW 2012 annual report, that looks like the answer for many professional screenwriters already. More »

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Writers Guild WestHere at nofilmschool, we’ve written several posts covering the evolution of The Black List and its paid screenplay hosting service. Just last month, we analyzed the Black List success story of Richard Cordiner getting noticed on the service and signing a deal with Warner Bros. Now, The Black List has announced a major partnership with The Writers Guild of America, West, providing free and discounted services on The Black List to WGAW members. Originally, The Black List paid service seemed like a gateway for undiscovered writers to access industry executives, so this new announcement begs the question: Who really benefits from The Black List’s services? The Black List founder Franklin Leonard offers some insight as he explained this new partnership with WGAW. More »

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sopranosJust as they did in 2006 with their list of the 101 Best Written Screenplays, the Writer’s Guild of America has released their list of the 101 best-written TV series. While many screenwriters aspire to see their vision on the big screen, with cable becoming ever more cinematic every year, the hard and fast division between the two mediums, at least in terms of quality, is fast falling by the wayside. Click below for the top ten on the WGA’s list! More »

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As many of us here consider ourselves DIY filmmakers, the thought of packaging our scripts with talent may not cross our minds frequently. Yet, even for the most independent project, we need an audience. As writers, we need to write for our audience. By this, I don’t mean we should pander to the audience or write what the audience expects. Rather, as we craft our stories on the page, we need to keep our readers engaged. Those readers include producers, casting agents, and talent, as a recent WGAw educational panel reiterated for aspiring writers. More »