» Posts Tagged ‘woodyallen’

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Darius KhondjiAfter one glance at Darius Khondji’s IMDb page it’s easy to see that the famed French cinematographer is a living legend. From his work with David Fincher (Se7ven, Panic Room), to Michael Haneke (Funny Games, Amour), to Woody Allen (Midnight in Paris, To Rome With Love), and my personal favorite, Jean Pierre Jeunet/Marc Caro (Delicatessen, City of Lost Children), it’s safe to say the Khondji has had a storied career as a cinematographer. IndieWire recently talked with Khodji about his advice for low-budget cinematographers who are shooting on location, and needless to say, the man had some invaluable tips. Here are a few of my favorites. More »

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Gordon WillisOn the set of The Godfather, one of the biggest lighting “mistakes” in filmmaking became one of the most iconic cinematographic choices in film history. The decision to light Marlon Brando from the top, casting a complete shadow over his eyes, was that of master cinematographer Gordon Willis. He recently sat down with Craft Truck for an interview, discussing how he got his most famous shots, what it was like working with Francis Ford Coppola and Woody Allen, and what he thinks new cinematographers should avoid and pursue when starting out. More »

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Midnight in Paris Woody Allen

Recently Sony Pictures took home a fair use win over a Faulkner quote in Woody Allen’s 2011 flick Midnight in Paris. There’s been a fair bit of chat about fair use recently, especially after Andy Baio’s unfortunate out-of-court settlement over an infringement which he possibly could have established as fair use, had he hired the army of lawyers and consultants that Sony Pictures used to spar with Faulkner, Inc. Still, Sony’s win is a small step forward in a much larger war, so let’s celebrate with a look at five court cases upholding our right to reference and remix others’ art in our own art. More »

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Alisa LepselterWoody Allen’s films are known for many things, but editing isn’t necessarily one of them. Which isn’t to say that the cutting in a Woody Allen film isn’t excellent, it’s just not something that calls attention to itself, except for rare occasions like the beautiful black and white shots that open Manhattan. And it’s his unobtrusive cutting style that has helped subtly define his films, with simple switches from a single to an over the shoulder changing the emotional tone of a dialogue scene without the audience even noticing. Invisible editing is everywhere, of course, but Woody’s working methods are famously unique, and now Alisa Lepster, his editor for 15 years, talks about the process of this legendary writer/director and how to cut a Woody Allen movie. More »