» Posts Tagged ‘zeisscp2’

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Girl Who Dresses the Universe“Ex nihilo” is a Latin phrase, meaning “out of nothing,” which is interesting considering that it’s the title of Italian filmmaker and founder of production studio Medhelan Movies, Stefano Pasotti’s spectacular Ex Nihilo: The Girl Who Dresses the Universe – which, if you’ve seen it you’d know, definitely didn’t come from nothing. Pasotti shared with NFS the steps he took to obtain these incredible in-camera effects, including gear, camera settings, and the use of blacklights and special makeup. Continue on to learn exactly how Pasotti and his team pulled it off. More »

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Who wants to get their hands on the RED EPIC-X Pro Collection? Well, if you’re like me and your couch-change is a little shy of $48,260, then you may want to consider submitting your short films and/or stills to HDVideoPro’s 7th Annual Emerging Pro Still & Motion Competition. Presented by RED, Zeiss, and Adobe, HDVideoPro and Digital Photo Pro are teaming up this year to award the photographers and filmmakers who submit their best work. Here’s an example of what you can find in the competition’s motion gallery: More »

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Not to be outdone by Canon’s recent lens announcement, Zeiss today unveiled a few new full-frame 35mm cinema lenses to round out their lineup. The two lenses announced, a CP.2 25mm T/2.1, and a CZ.2 28-80mm T/2.9, complement a selection of lenses that are somewhat future proof because of the frame size they cover and their interchangeable lens mounts. The Compact Zoom, like most cinema zooms, is going to be a rental for most people, but it’s one of the few real cinema zooms in existence that keeps focus through the entire zoom range and covers the full-frame 35mm image circle (36mm x 24mm). More »

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While I often recommend the Nikon mount version of almost any lens out there because of its compatibility with both Nikon and Canon, there is one potential drawback that makes Nikon lenses very difficult to work with for some people: they rotate in the opposite direction to Canon and cinema lenses. While this doesn’t bother me, since I almost exclusively use Nikon lenses or use a follow focus with a reversing gear, a lot of people need a lens to work the “correct” way from the start. The other reason I always recommend the Nikon version, is because often it’s the only version with a manual aperture ring, which increases adaptability — whereas the Canon EF mount variety of these lenses (namely Zeiss), do not have a manual aperture that lets you to physically select the f-stop. In a cinema setting, this is a necessity, which is why a Chinese company called GL Optics has developed a cinemod for the Zeiss ZE lenses that does everything a normal cinemod does, but also adds a manual iris ring. More »

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Zeiss has never been a company to disappoint. They consistently make fantastic manual focus lenses, and they now make lenses with just about every popular lens mount. Today they announced a new, ultra-expensive lens, the 15mm F/2.8 in ZF and ZE mounts. The internal design seems to be an improvement over the original Zeiss 15mm f/2.8, which was made for Zeiss Ikon and Leica M cameras. That lens, at $4600, makes this lens look like a bargain. More »

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Zeiss’s popular Compact Primes are getting some brothers and sisters. To their current full frame, interchangeable lens mount lineup, Zeiss is planning on adding new Compact Prime CP.2s of wider than 18 mm and longer (or equal to) 100 mm, a compact tele zoom lens (70-200 mm, possibly), and a complete set of Anamorphic prime lenses — with a 2X squeeze, which at first I found a bit odd. More »

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After speaking at AENY, a great community of film/MGFX folks in NYC, I was chatting with some DPs and one of them mentioned Chinese knockoffs of the Zeiss CP2 lenses. My ears perked up, as there’s a dearth of low-cost cinema primes in the world. The Zeiss CP2s, at $4k a lens, are in fact some of the cheapest available at roughly $20k a set. It turns out the Chinese knockoffs he mentioned retain the genuine Zeiss optics, for half the price. The question is, are they any good? More »