August 31, 2014

Atomos Releases New Pro HDMI Cables & Opens Up Their Camera Start/Stop Trigger Standard

Though the HDMI standard was never meant for the rigors of professional use like SDI cables with locking BNC connectors, external recorder-maker Atomos has decided to produce their own pro HDMI cables that are made for production.

These cables, originally developed for their ultra-small Ninja Star recorder, are coiled and available in all different configurations, from Micro to full-size HDMI all the way to full-size HDMI to HDMI, and everything in between (and a number of them also come with right angles). What makes these cables different, however, is that they are designed to be tighter-fitting, and stay inside your camera and your monitor when you need them to.

Atomos Pro Coiled HDMI Cable

And while you still might not be impressed with a cable, Atomos has been working with companies over the last few years to send start/stop and timecode information out of the HDMI ports of cameras, and they are now opening up that technology to the industry, in the hopes that all cameras will eventually have smarter HDMI ports. HDMI isn't the best connector in the world for mission-critical applications, but as long as manufacturers continue to release HDMI-only cameras, they might as well have some of the functionality of the professional standard.

On the recorder side, while they have not yet released the new Shogun capable of recording 4K, Atomos has dropped the price on their SDI-only 5" Samurai Blade recorder to $1,000, which brings it in line with their HDMI-only Samurai Ninja. Now both recorders retail for $1,000, and can be converted to the opposite format with the Atomos Connect devices. Having used the Ninja extensively, the monitor on the device itself is very good on its own even if you're not using it as a recorder all the time.

Atomos Samurai Blade

You can find these cables and the Samurai Blade over at B&H and other resellers.

Your Comment

14 Comments

"Shogun capable of recording 4K." Can something like this be used on the Blackmagic Ursa in place of using CFAST 2.0 cards?

August 31, 2014 at 8:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Michael

If an Ursa has clean hdmi/SDI etc out, then yes you can use a Shogun.

August 31, 2014 at 9:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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shaun wilson

Interesting. Thank you!

August 31, 2014 at 9:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Michael

@Michael - Aha! Nice idea.. why didn't I think of it.. URSA comes back to the watchlist

August 31, 2014 at 11:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Archie

Don't you need proprietary cards for the Shogun itself?

September 1, 2014 at 2:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Daniel

Yes. Check the link. http://nofilmschool.com/2014/06/atomos-ninja-star-prores-cfast-1-card/

But they are using Cfast 1.0 100MB 230$ 128 GB. Impossible to get raw with this cards. Still it is less expensive to buy the shogun and a couple of Cfast 1.0 than the standard 1200$ Cfast 2.0

September 1, 2014 at 3:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Nope, the Shogun can use SSD or HDD drives too :)

September 1, 2014 at 6:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dominik Belancic

Is it an irony to buy a external recorder for a camera capable of recording RAW 60fps 4k 12bits internally?

.....oh boy. Oohh jojo boy. Something is wrong here

September 1, 2014 at 2:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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The Ursa is a 4K recorder first and camera second, using it with an external recorder is a waste.

September 1, 2014 at 6:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Tulio

There's nothing "Pro" about HDMI, just sayin'

September 1, 2014 at 8:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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agent55

Hdmi is the worst! Just shot a feature with pocket cams and hdmi is so fickle. TC through it is a good idea, but I'll take BNC any day of the week.

September 1, 2014 at 11:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Hi haters

The wire coil is not the best idea since it will, in many instances, put constant pull pressure on the connector. And it does not facilitate the best HDMI practice (next to a locking plate) of creating an s loop and taping it down to secure the connector in place and prevent it from being tugged out. Please give us straight cable options.

September 1, 2014 at 12:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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William

You can actually stretch out the coil and it will stay stretched, then push it back together and it will stay that way. The idea is that you can have 1 cable but tailor the length of the cable to your needs.

September 1, 2014 at 4:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dembek

Now what needs to happen is for a bunch of pro and pro-sumer camera manufacturers to agree on a more professional HDMI port and plug form factor, and then make it an open pseudo-standard across the industry. Obviously, this wouldn't be included directly in the main HDMI standard, but, as Atomos has done here, there seems to be a reasonable amount of room for extra additions to the interface's functionality.
So, how about making it pseudo-standard practice to include a special locking connector (even screw-in locks as simple as those found on older computer VGA cables would be fine). Combine that with this start/stop and TC functionality, and give it some sort of consortium-agreed-upon brand name, and suddenly the format becomes much more viable.
Of course, there's a fair argument to be made for just using 6G SDI instead... but that's still not completely released yet, last I checked.

September 1, 2014 at 5:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mr Blah

Camera manufacturers should make hdmi ports with set screw configuration like monitor cables then they wouldn't pull out.

September 5, 2014 at 12:42AM

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